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    Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    DEA CLASS

    Rx

    DESCRIPTION

    Paromomycin (also known as aminosidine (injection), Gabbromicina) is an aminoglycoside antibiotic; spectrum of activity includes many of the protozoal species, gram negative aerobic bacteria (not Pseudomonas aeruginosa), Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis. are resistant to paromomycin. Anaerobic bacteria, streptococci, and gram positive bacilli are relatively resistant.

    COMMON BRAND NAMES

    Humatin

    HOW SUPPLIED

    Humatin/Paromomycin/Paromomycin Sulfate Oral Cap: 250mg

    DOSAGE & INDICATIONS

    For the treatment of intestinal amebiasis (Dientamoeba fragilis†, Entamoeba histolytica) including asymptomatic intestinal colonization.
    Oral dosage
    Adults, Adolescents, and Children

    25—35 mg/kg/day PO in 3 divided doses for 7—10 days.

    For the adjunctive treatment of hepatic coma or hepatic encephalopathy (via suppression of intestinal bacterial growth).
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    4 g/day PO in divided doses, at regular intervals for 5—10 days.

    For the treatment of Cryptosporidium parvum† (cryptosporidiosis†) in HIV-infected patients.
    Oral dosage
    Adults and Adolescents

    500 mg PO 4 times daily for 14—21 days in combination with optimized antiretroviral therapy, symptomatic treatment, rehydration, and electrolyte replacement.

    For the treatment of giardiasis†.
    Oral dosage
    Adults, Adolescents, and Children

    30 mg/kg/day PO for at least 5 days.

    For the treatment of tapeworm infestations (cestodiasis†).
    NOTE: Paromomycin is rarely used for the treatment of tapeworms.
    For worm infections caused by Diphyllobothrium latum†, Dipylidium caninum†, Taenia saginata†, and Taenia solium†.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    1 g PO every 15 minutes for 4 doses.

    Children

    11 mg/kg PO every 15 minutes for 4 doses. Single dose regimens generally result in a lower cure rate and are not recommended, due to the low absorption of the antibiotic, and the inaccessibility of the cystoides that are buried within the intestinal villi.

    For worm infections caused by Hymenolepis nana†.
    Oral dosage
    Adults, Adolescents, and Children

    45 mg/kg/day PO for 5—7 days.

    For the treatment of leishmaniasis†.
    For visceral leishmaniasis†.
    NOTE: Paromomycin has been designated an orphan drug by the FDA for this indication.
    Intramuscular dosage† (not available in the US)
    Adults

    Doses of aminosidine 16 or 20 mg/kg IM for 21 days were significantly more effective in producing final cure than sodium stibogluconate 20 mg/kg/day for 30 days.

    For cutaneous leishmaniasis†.
    Topical dosage†
    Adults, Adolescents, and Children

    A topical 15%—20% paromomycin ointment applied twice daily to the affected area(s) has been used for up to 30 days. A topical formulation of 15% paromomycin ointment combined with 12% methylbenzethonium chloride was applied twice daily for 30 days in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis and exhibited an 87% cure rate. Ninety four percent of the lesions healed with little or no scaring. The HIV guidelines suggest as an option.

    Intramuscular dosage† (not available in the US)
    Adults

    In 1 trial, patients were randomized to receive aminosidine sulfate 12 mg aminosidine base/kg/day, 12 mg/kg/day, or 18 mg/kg/day IM for 14 days. The cure rates after 12 months were 10%, 45%, and 50%, respectively, which are inferior to other treatment options (e.g., antimony or pentamidine). This study concluded that aminosidine IM as a single agent is less likely to be effective in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis than visceral leishmaniasis.

    †Indicates off-label use

    MAXIMUM DOSAGE

    Adults

    Aminoglycoside dosing is highly variable and dependent on several factors. The FDA lists the maximum recommended therapeutic dose as 35 mg/kg/day; doses up to 45 mg/kg/day have been used.

    Elderly

    Aminoglycoside dosing is highly variable and dependent on several factors. The FDA lists the maximum recommended therapeutic dose as 35 mg/kg/day; doses up to 45 mg/kg/day have been used.

    Adolescents

    Aminoglycoside dosing is highly variable and dependent on several factors. The FDA lists the maximum recommended therapeutic dose as 35 mg/kg/day; doses up to 45 mg/kg/day have been used.

    Children

    Aminoglycoside dosing is highly variable and dependent on several factors. The FDA lists the maximum recommended therapeutic adult dose as 35 mg/kg/day; however, doses up to 45 mg/kg/day have been used in children and adults.

    DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

    Hepatic Impairment

    No oral dosage adjustment required. Use aminoglycosides with caution in patients with severe hepatic disease (cirrhosis), as use under certain circumstances may precipitate hepato-renal syndrome.

    Renal Impairment

    No oral dosage adjustments are recommended at this time. Caution should be taken in patients with renal impairment or renal failure who also have impaired gut integrity.

    ADMINISTRATION

    Oral Administration

    Oral paromomycin should be administered with meals.

    Topical Administration

    NOTE: Paromomycin is not FDA approved for topical administration.

    Cream/Ointment/Lotion Formulations

    Rub cream or ointment gently into cleansed affected area. Care should be taken to avoid further contamination of the infected skin.

    Intravaginal Administration

    NOTE: Paromomycin is not FDA approved for vaginal administration.
    Apply intravaginally only those paromomycin products labeled for intravaginal use.
    Instruct patient not to use tampons, douches, or spermicides during the treatment course; the patient should also be instructed to abstain from sexual activity during treatment.

    Extemporaneous Compounding-Vaginal

    Preparation of vaginal product:
    The commercially available paromomycin capsules are opened, and the powder contents levigated into a hydrophilic cream base to yield 250 mg paromomycin per 4 g base (6.25%).

    STORAGE

    Humatin:
    - Protect from moisture
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)

    CONTRAINDICATIONS / PRECAUTIONS

    Aminoglycoside hypersensitivity

    Patients with aminoglycoside hypersensitivity should not receive paromomycin. Allergenic reactions to aminoglycosides are generally uncommon, but hypersensitivity with one agent may demonstrate cross-sensitivity with another aminoglycoside.

    Colitis, diarrhea, GI disease, GI obstruction, ileus, inflammatory bowel disease, pseudomembranous colitis, ulcerative colitis

    Paromomycin is contraindicated for use in GI obstruction, ileus, and should be used with caution in the setting of impaired gut integrity including ulcerative colitis or inflammatory bowel disease due to increased risk of paromomycin absorption. However, large doses of paromomycin have been given to AIDS patients with cryptosporidiosis for extended periods of time with no adverse effects. Additionally, almost all antibacterial agents have been associated with pseudomembranous colitis (antibiotic-associated colitis) which may range in severity from mild to life-threatening. In the colon, overgrowth of Clostridia may exist when normal flora is altered subsequent to antibacterial administration. The toxin produced by Clostridium difficile is a primary cause of pseudomembranous colitis. It is known that systemic use of antibiotics predisposes patients to development of pseudomembranous colitis. Consideration should be given to the diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis in patients presenting with diarrhea following antibacterial administration. Systemic antibiotics should be prescribed with caution to patients with inflammatory bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis or other GI disease. If diarrhea develops during therapy, the drug should be discontinued. Following diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis, therapeutic measures should be instituted. In milder cases, the colitis may respond to discontinuation of the offending agent. In moderate to severe cases, fluids and electrolytes, protein supplementation, and treatment with an antibacterial effective against Clostridium difficile may be warranted. Products inhibiting peristalsis are contraindicated in this clinical situation. Practitioners should be aware that antibiotic-associated colitis has been observed to occur over two months or more following discontinuation of systemic antibiotic therapy; a careful medical history should be taken.

    Driving or operating machinery, hearing impairment

    Patients with preexisting tinnitus, vertigo, or subclinical high-frequency hearing impairment should be closely monitored for signs of ototoxicity during therapy with paromomycin. Patients should be warned to avoid driving or operating machinery until they know how this drug may affect them.

    Dehydration, renal failure, renal impairment

    Paromomycin should be used cautiously in patients with renal failure, renal impairment, or dehydration, and in elderly patients. In normal conditions, paromomycin is not orally absorbed; however, in cases of compromised gut integrity, some of the drug may be absorbed and elevated levels could occur in patients with renal impairment or failure.

    Botulism, myasthenia gravis, parkinsonism

    Aminoglycosides may cause severe neuromuscular weakness lasting hours to days because of their potential curare-like effect. However, this effect is rare unless the aminoglycoside is given by peritoneally. Paromomycin may aggravate muscle weakness in patients with muscular disorders such as myasthenia gravis, infant botulism, or parkinsonism.

    Pregnancy

    Paromomycin is classified as FDA pregnancy risk category C. Oral paromomycin is not absorbed under normal conditions; however, it should only be used in pregnancy if potential benefits outweigh the risks of therapy. Paromomycin has been used during early pregnancy to treat Giardia infections, because it is not systemically absorbed.

    Breast-feeding

    The manufacturer does not give specific recommendations regarding the use of paromomycin in breast feeding women. However, oral paromomycin is not absorbed systemically under normal conditions, with nearly 100% of the drug recoverable in the stool. Due to the lack of systemic absorption, paromomycin would not be expected to pass into milk while breast-feeding. Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential infant drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding infant experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally administered drug, healthcare providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Severe

    hearing loss / Delayed / Incidence not known
    oliguria / Early / Incidence not known
    renal tubular acidosis (RTA) / Delayed / Incidence not known
    azotemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    renal failure (unspecified) / Delayed / Incidence not known
    renal tubular necrosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hyposthenuria / Delayed / Incidence not known
    proteinuria / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Moderate

    superinfection / Delayed / Incidence not known
    myasthenia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    pyuria / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Mild

    vertigo / Early / Incidence not known
    diarrhea / Early / Incidence not known
    abdominal pain / Early / Incidence not known
    nausea / Early / Incidence not known
    cylindruria / Delayed / Incidence not known

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Acetaminophen; Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Magnesium Salicylate; Phenyltoloxamine: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Phenyltoloxamine; Salicylamide: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine; Phenyltoloxamine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Acetaminophen; Diphenhydramine: (Minor) Diphenhydramine may mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Acyclovir: (Major) Additive nephrotoxicity is possible if systemic aminoglycosides are used with acyclovir. Carefully monitor renal function during concomitant therapy.
    Adefovir: (Moderate) Chronic coadministration of adefovir with nephrotoxic drugs, such as aminoglycosides, may increase the risk of developing nephrotoxicity, even in patients who have normal renal function.
    Aldesleukin, IL-2: (Moderate) Aldesleukin, IL 2 may cause nephrotoxicity. Concurrent administration of drugs possessing nephrotoxic effects, such as the aminoglycosides, with Aldesleukin, IL 2 may increase the risk of kidney dysfunction. In addition, reduced kidney function secondary to Aldesleukin, IL 2 treatment may delay elimination of concomitant medications and increase the risk of adverse events from those drugs.
    Aminosalicylate sodium, Aminosalicylic acid: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Amphotericin B cholesteryl sulfate complex (ABCD): (Minor) Because the systemic absorption of paromomycin is minimal, the risk of this interaction is expected to be low; however, the combined use of amphotericin B and systemic paromomycin may increase the risk of nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity. Intensive monitoring of renal function is recommended. Amphotericin B dosage reduction may be necessary if renal impairment occurs.
    Amphotericin B lipid complex (ABLC): (Minor) Because the systemic absorption of paromomycin is minimal, the risk of this interaction is expected to be low; however, the combined use of amphotericin B and systemic paromomycin may increase the risk of nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity. Intensive monitoring of renal function is recommended. Amphotericin B dosage reduction may be necessary if renal impairment occurs.
    Amphotericin B liposomal (LAmB): (Minor) Because the systemic absorption of paromomycin is minimal, the risk of this interaction is expected to be low; however, the combined use of amphotericin B and systemic paromomycin may increase the risk of nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity. Intensive monitoring of renal function is recommended. Amphotericin B dosage reduction may be necessary if renal impairment occurs.
    Amphotericin B: (Minor) Because the systemic absorption of paromomycin is minimal, the risk of this interaction is expected to be low; however, the combined use of amphotericin B and systemic paromomycin may increase the risk of nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity. Intensive monitoring of renal function is recommended. Amphotericin B dosage reduction may be necessary if renal impairment occurs.
    Aprotinin: (Moderate) The manufacturer recommends using aprotinin cautiously in patients that are receiving drugs that can affect renal function, such as the aminoglycosides, as the risk of renal impairment may be increased.
    Aspirin, ASA: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Aspirin, ASA; Carisoprodol: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Aspirin, ASA; Carisoprodol; Codeine: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Aspirin, ASA; Dipyridamole: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Aspirin, ASA; Omeprazole: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Aspirin, ASA; Oxycodone: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Aspirin, ASA; Pravastatin: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Atracurium: (Moderate) Aminoglycosides traditionally have been associated with neuromuscular blockade, but this event is most likely to occur when aminoglycoside solutions are used to irrigate wounds intraoperatively. Neuromuscular blockers should be used cautiously in patients receiving aminoglycosides.
    Atropine; Benzoic Acid; Hyoscyamine; Methenamine; Methylene Blue; Phenyl Salicylate: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Atropine; Hyoscyamine; Phenobarbital; Scopolamine: (Minor) Antiemetics, like scopolamine, should be used carefully with amikacin because they can mask symptoms of ototoxicity (e.g., nausea secondary to vertigo). These agents block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular (inner ear) emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Bacitracin: (Minor) Additive nephrotoxicity may occur with concurrent use of bacitracin and other nephrotoxic agents. When possible, avoid concomitant administration of systemic bacitracin and other nephrotoxic drugs such as aminoglycosides (particularly kanamycin, streptomycin, and neomycin).Use of topically administrated preparations containing bacitracin, especially when applied to large surface areas, with aminoglycosides may have additive nephrotoxic potential.
    Benzoic Acid; Hyoscyamine; Methenamine; Methylene Blue; Phenyl Salicylate: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Beractant: (Moderate) A reduced activity of paromomycin may occur in the presence of surfactant when given via nebulization.
    Bismuth Subsalicylate: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Bismuth Subsalicylate; Metronidazole; Tetracycline: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Bleomycin: (Moderate) Previous treatment with nephrotoxic agents, like aminoglycosides, may result in decreased clearance of bleomycin if renal function has been impaired.
    Botulinum Toxins: (Minor) The effects of botulinum toxin can be potentiated by systemic aminoglycosides or other drugs that interfere with neuromuscular transmission. However, paromomycin is not well absorbed following oral administration; interactions are not expected.
    Bumetanide: (Moderate) The risk of ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity secondary to aminoglycosides may be increased by the addition of concomitant therapies with similar side effects, including loop diuretics. If loop diuretics and aminoglycosides are used together, it would be prudent to monitor renal function parameters, serum electrolytes, and serum aminoglycoside concentrations during therapy. Audiologic monitoring may be advisable during high dose therapy or therapy of long duration, when hearing loss is suspected, or in selected risk groups (e.g., neonates).
    Calfactant: (Moderate) A reduced activity of paromomycin may occur in the presence of surfactant when given via nebulization.
    Capreomycin: (Major) The concomitant use of capreomycin and aminoglycosides may increase the risk of nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity. Since capreomycin is eliminated by the kidney, coadministration of capreomycin with other potentially nephrotoxic drugs, including aminoglycosides may increase serum concentrations of either capreomycin or aminoglycosides. Theoretically, coadministration may increase the risk of developing nephrotoxicity, even in patients who have normal renal function. Monitor patients for changes in renal function if these drugs are coadministered. Additionally, neuromuscular blockade has been associated with capreomycin resulting from administration of large doses or rapid intravenous infusion. Aminoglycosides have also been reported to interfere with nerve transmission at the neuromuscular junction. Concomitant administration of capreomycin with aminoglycosides should be avoided if possible; however, if they must be coadministered, use extreme caution.
    Carbetapentane; Chlorpheniramine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Carbetapentane; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Carbetapentane; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Diphenhydramine may mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Carboplatin: (Moderate) Patients previously or currently treated with other potentially nephrotoxic agents, such as systemic aminoglycosides, can have a greater risk of developing carboplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. These patients may benefit from hydration prior to carboplatin therapy to lessen the incidence of nephrotoxicity. Monitor renal function closely.
    Cefepime: (Minor) Cefepime's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides and loop diuretics. Carefully monitor renal function, especially during prolonged therapy or use of high aminoglycoside doses. The majority of reported cases involve the combination of aminoglycosides and cephalothin or cephaloridine, which are associated with dose-related nephrotoxicity as singular agents. Limited but conflicting data with other cephalosporins have been noted.
    Cefotaxime: (Minor) Cefotaxime's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides and loop diuretics. Carefully monitor renal function, especially during prolonged therapy or use of high aminoglycoside doses. The majority of reported cases involve the combination of aminoglycosides and cephalothin or cephaloridine, which are associated with dose-related nephrotoxicity as singular agents. Limited but conflicting data with other cephalosporins have been noted.
    Cefotetan: (Minor) Cefotetan's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides. Carefully monitor renal function, especially during prolonged therapy or use of high aminoglycoside doses. The majority of reported cases involve the combination of aminoglycosides and cephalothin or cephaloridine, which are associated with dose-related nephrotoxicity as singular agents. Limited but conflicting data with other cephalosporins have been noted.
    Cefoxitin: (Minor) Cefoxitin's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides. Carefully monitor renal function, especially during prolonged therapy or use of high aminoglycoside doses. The majority of reported cases involve the combination of aminoglycosides and cephalothin or cephaloridine, which are associated with dose-related nephrotoxicity as singular agents. Limited but conflicting data with other cephalosporins have been noted.
    Cefprozil: (Minor) Cefprozil's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides and loop diuretics. Carefully monitor renal function, especially during prolonged therapy or use of high aminoglycoside doses. The majority of reported cases involve the combination of aminoglycosides and cephalothin or cephaloridine, which are associated with dose-related nephrotoxicity as singular agents. Limited but conflicting data with other cephalosporins have been noted.
    Ceftazidime: (Minor) Ceftazidime's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides and loop diuretics. Carefully monitor renal function, especially during prolonged therapy or use of high aminoglycoside doses. The majority of reported cases involve the combination of aminoglycosides and cephalothin or cephaloridine, which are associated with dose-related nephrotoxicity as singular agents. Limited but conflicting data with other cephalosporins have been noted.
    Ceftazidime; Avibactam: (Minor) Ceftazidime's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides and loop diuretics. Carefully monitor renal function, especially during prolonged therapy or use of high aminoglycoside doses. The majority of reported cases involve the combination of aminoglycosides and cephalothin or cephaloridine, which are associated with dose-related nephrotoxicity as singular agents. Limited but conflicting data with other cephalosporins have been noted.
    Ceftizoxime: (Minor) Ceftizoxime's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides. Carefully monitor renal function, especially during prolonged therapy or use of high aminoglycoside doses. The majority of reported cases involve the combination of aminoglycosides and cephalothin or cephaloridine, which are associated with dose-related nephrotoxicity as singular agents. Limited but conflicting data with other cephalosporins have been noted.
    Cefuroxime: (Minor) Cefuroxime's product label states that cephalosporins may potentiate the adverse renal effects of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides and loop diuretics. Carefully monitor renal function, especially during prolonged therapy or use of high aminoglycoside doses. The majority of reported cases involve the combination of aminoglycosides and cephalothin or cephaloridine, which are associated with dose-related nephrotoxicity as singular agents. Limited but conflicting data with other cephalosporins have been noted.
    Chlorpheniramine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Chlorpheniramine; Codeine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dihydrocodeine; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dihydrocodeine; Pseudoephedrine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Chlorpheniramine; Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Chlorpheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Minor) Chlorpheniramine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Chlorpromazine: (Minor) When used for the treatment of nausea and vomiting, antiemetic phenothiazines may effectively mask symptoms that are associated with ototoxicity induced by the aminoglycosides.
    Choline Salicylate; Magnesium Salicylate: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Cidofovir: (Severe) The administration of cidofovir with other potentially nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides, is contraindicated. These agents should be discontinued at least 7 days prior to beginning cidofovir.
    Cisatracurium: (Moderate) Aminoglycosides traditionally have been associated with neuromuscular blockade, but this event is most likely to occur when aminoglycoside solutions are used to irrigate wounds intraoperatively. Neuromuscular blockers should be used cautiously in patients receiving aminoglycosides.
    Cisplatin: (Major) Aminoglycosides should be used cautiously in patients receiving cisplatin. Aminoglycosides can aggravate the nephrotoxicity and electrolyte loss seen with cisplatin if given concurrently or shortly after cisplatin therapy. Concurrent use of cisplatin and other nephrotoxic agents also known to be ototoxic (i.e., aminoglycosides) may increase the risk of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.
    Cobicistat; Elvitegravir; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate: (Moderate) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Codeine; Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Minor) Antiemetics, like promethazine, should be used carefully with aminoglycosides because they can mask symptoms of ototoxicity (e.g., nausea secondary to vertigo). These agents block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular (inner ear) emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Codeine; Promethazine: (Minor) Antiemetics, like promethazine, should be used carefully with aminoglycosides because they can mask symptoms of ototoxicity (e.g., nausea secondary to vertigo). These agents block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular (inner ear) emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Colfosceril; Cetyl Alcohol; Tyloxapol: (Moderate) A reduced activity of paromomycin may occur in the presence of surfactant when given via nebulization.
    Cyclizine: (Minor) Cyclizine may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Cyclosporine: (Minor) Because the systemic absorption of oral paromomycin is minimal, the risk of this interaction is expected to be low; however, the combined use of cyclosporine and paromomycin may increase the risk of nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity.
    Deferasirox: (Moderate) Acute renal failure has been reported during treatment with deferasirox. Coadministration of deferasirox with other potentially nephrotoxic drugs, including aminoglycosides, may increase the risk of this toxicity. Monitor serum creatinine and/or creatinine clearance in patients who are receiving deferasirox and aminoglycosides concomitantly.
    Dextromethorphan; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Diphenhydramine may mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Dextromethorphan; Promethazine: (Minor) Antiemetics, like promethazine, should be used carefully with aminoglycosides because they can mask symptoms of ototoxicity (e.g., nausea secondary to vertigo). These agents block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular (inner ear) emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Digoxin: (Moderate) In approximately 10% of patients, a small portion of oral digoxin is metabolized by GI flora. Administration of a nonabsorbable aminoglycoside antibiotic such as paromomycin can depress colonic bacteria and increase the oral bioavailability of digoxin in these patients. Large doses of neomycin have been reported to reduce the absorption of digoxin leading to reduced steady-state digoxin concentrations of 28%. Since paromomycin is structurally related to neomycin, it is possible that paromomycin could also reduce digoxin bioavailability. It is thought that the decrease in digoxin absorption is due to alterations in the properties of the gut wall. Therefore, separating the time of administration between these drugs and digoxin will probably not reduce the potential interaction. Since it is impossible to predict which patients will be affected in this manner, digoxin serum concentrations should be monitored closely if oral paromomycin is added.
    Dimenhydrinate: (Minor) Dimenhydrinate and other antiemetics should be used carefully with aminoglycosides because they can mask symptoms of ototoxicity, including nausea secondary to vertigo.
    Diphenhydramine: (Minor) Diphenhydramine may mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Diphenhydramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Diphenhydramine may mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Diphenhydramine; Ibuprofen: (Minor) Diphenhydramine may mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Diphenhydramine; Naproxen: (Minor) Diphenhydramine may mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Diphenhydramine may mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Doxacurium: (Moderate) Aminoglycosides traditionally have been associated with neuromuscular blockade, but this event is most likely to occur when aminoglycoside solutions are used to irrigate wounds intraoperatively. Neuromuscular blockers should be used cautiously in patients receiving aminoglycosides.
    Efavirenz; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir: (Moderate) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Emtricitabine; Rilpivirine; Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate: (Moderate) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Emtricitabine; Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate: (Moderate) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Enflurane: (Moderate) Both aminoglycosides and halogenated anesthetics may be associated with enhanced neuromuscular blocking effects; this is only seen when aminoglycosides are used to irrigate the abdominal cavity during surgery and unlikely when used parenterally.
    Entecavir: (Moderate) Because entecavir is primarily eliminated by the kidneys and aminoglycosides can affect renal function, concurrent administration with aminoglycosides may increase the serum concentrations of entecavir and adverse events. The manufacturer of entecavir recommends monitoring for adverse effects when these drugs are coadministered.
    Ethacrynic Acid: (Moderate) The risk of ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity secondary to aminoglycosides may be increased by the addition of concomitant therapies with similar side effects, including loop diuretics. If loop diuretics and aminoglycosides are used together, it would be prudent to monitor renal function parameters, serum electrolytes, and serum aminoglycoside concentrations during therapy. Audiologic monitoring may be advisable during high dose therapy or therapy of long duration, when hearing loss is suspected, or in selected risk groups (e.g., neonates).
    Fluphenazine: (Minor) When used for the treatment of nausea and vomiting, antiemetic phenothiazines may effectively mask symptoms that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides.
    Foscarnet: (Major) The risk of renal toxicity may be increased if foscarnet is used in conjunction with other nephrotoxic agents such as aminoglycosides.
    Furosemide: (Moderate) The risk of ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity secondary to aminoglycosides may be increased by the addition of concomitant therapies with similar side effects, including loop diuretics. If loop diuretics and aminoglycosides are used together, it would be prudent to monitor renal function parameters, serum electrolytes, and serum aminoglycoside concentrations during therapy. Audiologic monitoring may be advisable during high dose therapy or therapy of long duration, when hearing loss is suspected, or in selected risk groups (e.g., neonates).
    Gallium Ga 68 Dotatate: (Moderate) The risk of ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity secondary to aminoglycosides may be increased by the addition of concomitant therapies with similar side effects, including intravenous mannitol. In addition, intravenous mannitol may alter the serum and tissue concentrations of tobramycin, thereby, increasing the risk for aminoglycoside toxicities. If possible, avoid concurrent use. If these drugs must be used together, it would be prudent to monitor renal function, serum electrolytes, and serum aminoglycoside concentrations. Audiologic monitoring may be advisable during high dose therapy or therapy of long duration, when hearing loss is suspected, or in selected risk groups (e.g., neonates). Studies to evaluate a potential interaction between inhaled formulations of mannitol and tobramycin have not been conducted.
    Gallium: (Severe) Concurrent use of gallium nitrate with other potentially nephrotoxic drugs, such as aminoglycosides, may increase the risk for developing severe renal insufficiency. If use of an aminoglycoside is indicated, gallium nitrate administration should be discontinued, and hydration for several days after administration of the aminoglycoside is recommended. Serum creatinine concentrations and urine output should be closely monitored during and subsequent to this period. Gallium nitrate should be discontinued if the serum creatinine concentration exceeds 2.5 mg/dl.
    Ganciclovir: (Major) Concurrent use of nephrotoxic agents, such as the aminoglycosides, with ganciclovir should be done cautiously to avoid additive nephrotoxicity.
    Ginger, Zingiber officinale: (Minor) Ginger may mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by aminoglycosides. Antiemetics block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Gold: (Minor) Both aminoglycosides and gold compounds can cause nephrotoxicity. Auranofin has been reported to cause a nephrotic syndrome or glomerulonephritis with proteinuria and hematuria. Monitor renal function carefully during concurrent therapy.
    Hyaluronidase, Recombinant; Immune Globulin: (Moderate) Immune globulin (IG) products have been reported to be associated with renal dysfunction, acute renal failure, osmotic nephrosis, and death. Patients predisposed to acute renal failure include patients receiving known nephrotoxic drugs like aminoglycosides. Coadminister IG products at the minimum concentration available and the minimum rate of infusion practicable. Closely monitor renal function.
    Hyoscyamine; Methenamine; Methylene Blue; Phenyl Salicylate; Sodium Biphosphate: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Ibandronate: (Moderate) Theoretically, coadministration of intravenous ibandronate with other potentially nephrotoxic drugs like the aminoglycosides may increase the risk of developing nephrotoxicity.
    Ibuprofen lysine: (Moderate) Use caution in combining ibuprofen lysine with renally eliminated medications, like aminoglycosides, as ibuprofen lysine may reduce the clearance of aminoglycosides. Closely monitor renal function and adjust aminoglycoside doses based on renal function and serum aminoglycoside concentrations as clinically indicated.
    Ifosfamide: (Moderate) Nephrotoxic agents, such as the aminoglycosides, can increase the nephrotoxicity of ifosfamide. Damaged kidney tubules may be less likely to convert mesna to its active kidney protecting form, which may contribute to the potential for increased ifosfamide toxicity. Clinicians should be alert for an increased risk of ifosfamide toxicity, including neurotoxicity, renal toxicity, and bone marrow suppression.
    Immune Globulin IV, IVIG, IGIV: (Moderate) Immune globulin (IG) products have been reported to be associated with renal dysfunction, acute renal failure, osmotic nephrosis, and death. Patients predisposed to acute renal failure include patients receiving known nephrotoxic drugs like aminoglycosides. Coadminister IG products at the minimum concentration available and the minimum rate of infusion practicable. Closely monitor renal function.
    Iohexol: (Moderate) Because the use of other nephrotoxic drugs, such as aminoglycoside antibiotics, is an additive risk factor for nephrotoxicity in patients receiving radiopaque contrast agents, concomitant use should be avoided when possible.
    Iopamidol: (Moderate) Because the use of other nephrotoxic drugs, such as aminoglycoside antibiotics, is an additive risk factor for nephrotoxicity in patients receiving radiopaque contrast agents, concomitant use should be avoided when possible.
    Iopromide: (Moderate) Because the use of other nephrotoxic drugs, such as aminoglycoside antibiotics, is an additive risk factor for nephrotoxicity in patients receiving radiopaque contrast agents, concomitant use should be avoided when possible.
    Ioversol: (Moderate) Because the use of other nephrotoxic drugs, such as aminoglycoside antibiotics, is an additive risk factor for nephrotoxicity in patients receiving radiopaque contrast agents, concomitant use should be avoided when possible.
    Isosulfan Blue: (Moderate) Because the use of other nephrotoxic drugs, such as aminoglycoside antibiotics, is an additive risk factor for nephrotoxicity in patients receiving radiopaque contrast agents, concomitant use should be avoided when possible.
    Magnesium Salicylate: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Mannitol: (Moderate) The risk of ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity secondary to aminoglycosides may be increased by the addition of concomitant therapies with similar side effects, including intravenous mannitol. In addition, intravenous mannitol may alter the serum and tissue concentrations of tobramycin, thereby, increasing the risk for aminoglycoside toxicities. If possible, avoid concurrent use. If these drugs must be used together, it would be prudent to monitor renal function, serum electrolytes, and serum aminoglycoside concentrations. Audiologic monitoring may be advisable during high dose therapy or therapy of long duration, when hearing loss is suspected, or in selected risk groups (e.g., neonates). Studies to evaluate a potential interaction between inhaled formulations of mannitol and tobramycin have not been conducted.
    Meclizine: (Minor) Meclizine and other antiemetics should be used carefully with aminoglycosides because they can mask symptoms of ototoxicity (e.g., nausea secondary to vertigo).
    Meperidine; Promethazine: (Minor) Antiemetics, like promethazine, should be used carefully with aminoglycosides because they can mask symptoms of ototoxicity (e.g., nausea secondary to vertigo). These agents block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular (inner ear) emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Mesoridazine: (Minor) When used for the treatment of nausea and vomiting, antiemetic phenothiazines may effectively mask vestibular symptoms (e.g. dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo) that are associated with ototoxicity induced by various medications, including the aminoglycosides.
    Methotrexate: (Minor) Paromomycin may decrease the absorption and bioavailability of oral methotrexate. Paromomycin may decrease intestinal absorption of methotrexate or interfere with enterohepatic circulation by inhibiting bowel flora and suppressing metabolism of the drug by bacteria.
    Mivacurium: (Moderate) Aminoglycosides traditionally have been associated with neuromuscular blockade, but this event is most likely to occur when aminoglycoside solutions are used to irrigate wounds intraoperatively. Neuromuscular blockers should be used cautiously in patients receiving aminoglycosides.
    Neuromuscular blockers: (Moderate) Aminoglycosides traditionally have been associated with neuromuscular blockade, but this event is most likely to occur when aminoglycoside solutions are used to irrigate wounds intraoperatively. Neuromuscular blockers should be used cautiously in patients receiving aminoglycosides.
    Non-Ionic Contrast Media: (Moderate) Because the use of other nephrotoxic drugs, such as aminoglycoside antibiotics, is an additive risk factor for nephrotoxicity in patients receiving radiopaque contrast agents, concomitant use should be avoided when possible.
    Oral Contraceptives: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Pamidronate: (Moderate) Coadministration of pamidronate with other nephrotoxic drugs, such as aminoglycosides, may increase the risk of developing nephrotoxicity following pamidronate administration, even in patients who have normal renal function.
    Pancuronium: (Moderate) Aminoglycosides traditionally have been associated with neuromuscular blockade, but this event is most likely to occur when aminoglycoside solutions are used to irrigate wounds intraoperatively. Neuromuscular blockers should be used cautiously in patients receiving aminoglycosides.
    Pentamidine: (Major) Additive nephrotoxicity may be seen with the combination of pentamidine and other agents that cause nephrotoxicity, such as systemic aminoglycosides. Renal function and aminoglycoside concentratons should be closely monitored.
    Perphenazine: (Minor) When used for the treatment of nausea and vomiting, antiemetic phenothiazines may effectively mask symptoms that are associated with ototoxicity induced by the aminoglycosides.
    Perphenazine; Amitriptyline: (Minor) When used for the treatment of nausea and vomiting, antiemetic phenothiazines may effectively mask symptoms that are associated with ototoxicity induced by the aminoglycosides.
    Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Minor) Antiemetics, like promethazine, should be used carefully with aminoglycosides because they can mask symptoms of ototoxicity (e.g., nausea secondary to vertigo). These agents block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular (inner ear) emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Polymyxin B: (Major) The concomitant use of systemic Polymyxin B with systemic aminoglycosides increases the risk of nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity, and neurotoxicity. Since polymyxins and aminoglycosides are both eliminated by the kidney, coadministration may increase serum concentrations of either drug class. Monitor patients for changes in renal function if these drugs are coadministered. Additionally, neuromuscular blockade has been associated with both polymyxins and aminoglycosides, and is more likely to occur in patients with renal dysfunction.
    Polymyxins: (Major) The concomitant use of colistimethate sodium with systemic aminoglycosides may increase the risk of nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity, and neurotoxicity. Since polymyxins and aminoglycosides are both eliminated by the kidney, coadministration may increase serum concentrations of either drug class. If these drugs are used in combination, monitor renal function and patients for increased adverse effects. Additionally, neuromuscular blockade has been associated with both polymyxins and aminoglycosides, and is more likely to occur in patients with renal dysfunction.
    Poractant Alfa: (Moderate) A reduced activity of paromomycin may occur in the presence of surfactant when given via nebulization.
    Promethazine: (Minor) Antiemetics, like promethazine, should be used carefully with aminoglycosides because they can mask symptoms of ototoxicity (e.g., nausea secondary to vertigo). These agents block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular (inner ear) emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Pyridostigmine: (Moderate) Aminoglycosides have been associated with neuromuscular blockade when used as an abdominal irrigant intraoperatively. Although the risk of neuromuscular blockade is remote with parenteral aminoglycoside therapy, these antibiotics should be used cautiously in myasthenic patients. This represents a pharmacodynamic interaction with cholinesterase inhibitors when used to treat myasthenia gravis, rather than a pharmacokinetic interaction.
    Rapacuronium: (Moderate) Aminoglycosides traditionally have been associated with neuromuscular blockade, but this event is most likely to occur when aminoglycoside solutions are used to irrigate wounds intraoperatively. Neuromuscular blockers should be used cautiously in patients receiving aminoglycosides.
    Rocuronium: (Moderate) Aminoglycosides traditionally have been associated with neuromuscular blockade, but this event is most likely to occur when aminoglycoside solutions are used to irrigate wounds intraoperatively. Neuromuscular blockers should be used cautiously in patients receiving aminoglycosides.
    Salicylates: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Salsalate: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Scopolamine: (Minor) Antiemetics, like scopolamine, should be used carefully with amikacin because they can mask symptoms of ototoxicity (e.g., nausea secondary to vertigo). These agents block the histamine or acetylcholine response that causes nausea due to vestibular (inner ear) emetic stimuli such as motion.
    Sodium picosulfate; Magnesium oxide; Anhydrous citric acid: (Major) Prior or concomitant use of antibiotics with sodium picosulfate; magnesium oxide; anhydrous citric acid may reduce efficacy of the bowel preparation as conversion of sodium picosulfate to its active metabolite bis-(p-hydroxy-phenyl)-pyridyl-2-methane (BHPM) is mediated by colonic bacteria. If possible, avoid coadministration. Certain antibiotics (i.e., tetracyclines and quinolones) may chelate with the magnesium in sodium picosulfate; magnesium oxide; anhydrous citric acid solution. Therefore, these antibiotics should be taken at least 2 hours before and not less than 6 hours after the administration of sodium picosulfate; magnesium oxide; anhydrous citric acid solution.
    Streptozocin: (Moderate) Because streptozocin is nephrotoxic, concurrent or subsequent administration of other nephrotoxic agents, including aminoglycosides, could exacerbate the renal insult.
    Succinylcholine: (Moderate) Aminoglycosides traditionally have been associated with neuromuscular blockade, but this event is most likely to occur when aminoglycoside solutions are used to irrigate wounds intraoperatively. Neuromuscular blockers should be used cautiously in patients receiving aminoglycosides.
    Surfactants: (Moderate) A reduced activity of paromomycin may occur in the presence of surfactant when given via nebulization.
    Tacrolimus: (Moderate) Additive nephrotoxicity is possible if aminoglycosides are used with tacrolimus. Care should be taken in using tacrolimus with other nephrotoxic drugs. Assessment of renal function in patients who have received tacrolimus is recommended, as the tacrolimus dosage may need to be reduced
    Telavancin: (Major) Concurrent or sequential use of telavancin with other potentially nephrotoxic drugs (e.g., systemic aminoglycosides) may lead to additive nephrotoxicity. Televancin is closely related to vancomycin. In one clinical study, vancomycin coadministration, high aminoglycoside trough levels, and heart failure independently predicted acute kidney injury during aminoglycoside treatment. Closely monitor renal function and adjust telavancin doses based on creatinine clearance/renal function, and aminoglycoside doses based on renal function and serum aminoglycoside concentrations as clinically indicated.
    Tenofovir Alafenamide: (Moderate) Tenofovir-containing products, should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent, such as aminoglycosides. Tenofovir is primarily excreted via the kidneys by a combination of glomerular filtration and active tubular secretion. Coadministration of tenofovir alafenamide with drugs that are eliminated by active tubular secretion may increase concentrations of tenofovir, and/or the co-administered drug. Drugs that decrease renal function may also increase concentrations of tenofovir. Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Monitor patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus, and urine glucose and protein.
    Tenofovir, PMPA: (Moderate) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Thioridazine: (Minor) When used for the treatment of nausea and vomiting, antiemetic phenothiazines may effectively mask vestibular symptoms that are associated with ototoxicity induced by various medications, including the aminoglycosides.
    Torsemide: (Moderate) The risk of ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity secondary to aminoglycosides may be increased by the addition of concomitant therapies with similar side effects, including loop diuretics. If loop diuretics and aminoglycosides are used together, it would be prudent to monitor renal function parameters, serum electrolytes, and serum aminoglycoside concentrations during therapy. Audiologic monitoring may be advisable during high dose therapy or therapy of long duration, when hearing loss is suspected, or in selected risk groups (e.g., neonates).
    Trifluoperazine: (Minor) When used for the treatment of nausea and vomiting, antiemetic phenothiazines may mask symptoms that are associated with ototoxicity induced by the aminoglycosides.
    Trimethobenzamide: (Minor) Because of trimethobenzamide's antiemetic pharmacology, the drug may effectively mask dizziness, tinnitus, or vertigo that are associated with ototoxicity induced by various medications, including the aminoglycosides. Clinicians should be aware of this potential interaction and take it into consideration when monitoring for aminoglycoside-induced side effects.
    Tubocurarine: (Moderate) Aminoglycosides traditionally have been associated with neuromuscular blockade, but this event is most likely to occur when aminoglycoside solutions are used to irrigate wounds intraoperatively. Neuromuscular blockers should be used cautiously in patients receiving aminoglycosides.
    Urea: (Moderate) The risk of ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity secondary to aminoglycosides may be increased by the addition of concomitant therapies with similar side effects, including urea. In addition, urea may alter the serum and tissue concentrations of tobramycin, thereby, increasing the risk for aminoglycoside toxicities. If possible, avoid concurrent use. If these drugs must be used together, it would be prudent to monitor renal function, serum electrolytes, and serum aminoglycoside concentrations. Audiologic monitoring may be advisable during high dose therapy or therapy of long duration, when hearing loss is suspected, or in selected risk groups (e.g., neonates).
    Valganciclovir: (Major) Concurrent use of nephrotoxic agents, such as aminoglycosides, with valganciclovir should be done cautiously to avoid additive nephrotoxicity.
    Vancomycin: (Major) Concomitant use of parenteral vancomycin with other nephrotoxic drugs, such as aminoglycosides, can lead to additive nephrotoxicity. Both vancomycin and aminoglycosides may cause ototoxicity as well. In a clinical study, vancomycin coadministration, high aminoglycoside trough concentrations, and heart failure independently predicted acute kidney injury during aminoglycoside treatment. Renal function should be monitored closely, and vancomycin and aminoglycoside doses should be adjusted according to serum concentrations as clinically indicated.
    Vecuronium: (Moderate) Aminoglycosides traditionally have been associated with neuromuscular blockade, but this event is most likely to occur when aminoglycoside solutions are used to irrigate wounds intraoperatively. Neuromuscular blockers should be used cautiously in patients receiving aminoglycosides.
    Warfarin: (Moderate) A small rise in warfarin-induced hypoprothrombinemia may occur, possibly due to interference in absorption of dietary vitamin K by paromomycin.
    Zalcitabine, ddC: (Moderate) Drugs such as parenteral aminoglycosides may increase the risk of developing peripheral neuropathy or other zalcitabine-associated adverse events by interfering with the renal clearance of zalcitabine and thereby raising systemic drug exposure. Coadministration of these drugs with zalcitabine requires frequent clinical and laboratory monitoring, with dosage adjustment for any significant change in renal function.
    Zoledronic Acid: (Moderate) Since zoledronic acid is eliminated by the kidney, coadministration of zoledronic acid with other potentially nephrotoxic drugs may increase serum concentrations of either zoledronic acid and/or these coadministered drugs. Theoretically, the chronic coadministration of zoledronic acid with other nephrotoxic drugs, such as aminoglycosides, may increase the risk of developing nephrotoxicity.

    PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

    Pregnancy

    Paromomycin is classified as FDA pregnancy risk category C. Oral paromomycin is not absorbed under normal conditions; however, it should only be used in pregnancy if potential benefits outweigh the risks of therapy. Paromomycin has been used during early pregnancy to treat Giardia infections, because it is not systemically absorbed.

    The manufacturer does not give specific recommendations regarding the use of paromomycin in breast feeding women. However, oral paromomycin is not absorbed systemically under normal conditions, with nearly 100% of the drug recoverable in the stool. Due to the lack of systemic absorption, paromomycin would not be expected to pass into milk while breast-feeding. Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential infant drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding infant experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally administered drug, healthcare providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

    MECHANISM OF ACTION

    Mechanism of Action: Paromomycin is bactericidal in action. It inhibits bacterial protein synthesis through irreversible binding to the 30S ribosomal subunit of susceptible bacteria. Paromomycin is actively transported into the bacterial cell where it binds to receptors present on the 30S ribosomal subunit. This binding interferes with the initiation complex between the messenger RNA (mRNA) and the subunit. As a result, abnormal, nonfunctional proteins are formed due to misreading of the bacterial DNA. Eventually, susceptible bacteria die because of the lack of functional proteins. The antibacterial susceptibility to paromomycin is similar to neomycin. Organisms susceptible to paromomycin include Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, and other Enterobacteriaceae. In addition, paromomycin has shown activity against multiple-drug resistant tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex in in vitro and animal models. Complete cross-resistance exists between paromomycin, neomycin, and kanamycin. Like other aminoglycosides, paromomycin is ineffective against anaerobic bacteria.In the adjunctive treatment of hepatic encephalopathy or coma, paromomycin is used to suppress bacteria in the gut that produce urease, an enzyme that breaks down urea into carbon dioxide (CO2) and ammonia (NH3). By inhibiting the growth of urease-producing bacteria, the amount of ammonia available for absorption from the gut is decreased, resulting in decreased serum and CSF levels and clinical improvement.

    PHARMACOKINETICS

    Paromomycin (aminosidine) is administered orally, topically, intravaginally, or parenterally.

    Oral Route

    Paromomycin is not absorbed from the GI tract under normal conditions. Following oral administration, 100% of the drug is recovered in the feces. Small amounts may be absorbed from the gut in cases of compromised gut integrity, but this appears to be clinically insignificant.

    Intravenous Route

    Following IV injection of aminosidine, the half-life ranges from 2—3 hours in patients with normal renal function (creatinine clearance > 60 ml/min).

    Intramuscular Route

    Following IM injection of aminosidine, the half-life ranges from 2—3 hours in patients with normal renal function (creatinine clearance > 60 ml/min).