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    Salicylate Antiinflammatory Drugs

    BOXED WARNING

    Angina, cardiac disease, cerebrovascular disease, dehydration, edema, heart failure, hypertension, hypovolemia, myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, renal disease, renal failure, renal impairment, stroke, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    Salsalate, like all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), may exacerbate hypertension and congestive heart failure (see Adverse Reactions) and may cause an increased risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, which can be fatal. The risk may increase with duration of use, and patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors for cardiovascular disease (e.g., high blood pressure) may be at greater risk. Caution is recommended when administering salsalate to patients with cardiac disease, angina, peripheral vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease (e.g., stroke, transient ischemic attack), pre-existing renal disease, fluid retention, hypertension, or edema. Salicylates should be used with caution in patients with renal impairment and with extreme caution, if at all, in patients with advanced, chronic renal failure, as salicylic acid and its metabolites are excreted in the urine (see Pharmacokinetics). Patients with renal impairment may be at increased risk of developing nephrotoxicity due to salicylate therapy. Renal function should be monitored periodically in patients receiving prolonged or high-dose salicylate therapy, as nephrotoxicity may occur. Prolonged exposure to high doses of salicylates may cause hypokalemia due to both renal and extrarenal losses. Salicylates should be used cautiously in patients with renal disease or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) due to the risk of decreased glomerular filtration rate in these patients. Renal toxicity has also been seen in patients in whom renal prostaglandins have a compensatory role in the maintenance of renal perfusion. In these patients, administration of an NSAID may cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation and, secondarily, in renal blood flow, which may precipitate overt renal decompensation. Patients at greatest risk of this reaction are those with renal impairment, renal failure, heart failure, liver dysfunction, hypovolemia (dehydration), those taking diuretics and ACE inhibitors, or older patients. Discontinuation of NSAID therapy is usually followed by recovery.

    Alcoholism, anemia, anticoagulant therapy, corticosteroid therapy, esophagitis, gastritis, GI bleeding, GI disease, GI perforation, peptic ulcer disease, tobacco smoking

    Salsalate can cause gastritis, ulceration with or without GI perforation, and/or GI bleeding, which can occur at any time, often without preceding symptoms. Non-acetylated salicylates should be used with extreme caution in patients with a history of or active GI disease including erosive gastritis, esophagitis, GI bleeding, peptic ulcer disease, or previous NSAID-induced bleeding. Patients at increased risk for NSAID-induced GI bleeding include those receiving concurrent myelosuppressive chemotherapy, corticosteroid therapy, or anticoagulant therapy, tobacco smoking patients, and patients with alcoholism. Older patients seem to tolerate GI ulceration or bleeding less well than younger patients. Most fatal GI events occur in older or debilitated patients. In patients who develop gastric or duodenal ulcers during salicylate treatment, the drug should be discontinued due to an increased risk of bleeding and/or perforation. Anemia may be exacerbated during salicylate therapy due to GI blood loss. Hematocrit should be monitored periodically in patients receiving prolonged or high-dose salicylate therapy, as iron deficiency anemia may occur. Patients should not receive salicylates if they consume 3 or more alcoholic beverages per day because of the potential increased risk for GI bleeding. Closely monitor all patients for potential GI ulceration and bleeding (see Adverse Reactions).

    DEA CLASS

    Rx

    DESCRIPTION

    A nonacetylated nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agent; not effective as an anitpyretic; fewer GI effects than aspirin and has no affect on platelet function.

    COMMON BRAND NAMES

    Amigesic, Argesic-SA, Disalcid, Mono Gesic, Salflex

    HOW SUPPLIED

    Amigesic/Argesic-SA/Disalcid/Mono Gesic/Salflex/Salsalate Oral Tab: 500mg, 750mg

    DOSAGE & INDICATIONS

    For treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or related rheumatic disorder.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    1,500 mg PO twice daily or 1,000 mg PO 3 times per day; titrate dosage according to patient response. Full benefit may not occur for 3 to 4 days.

    MAXIMUM DOSAGE

    Adults

    Maximum dosage information is not available.

    Elderly

    Maximum dosage information is not available.

    Adolescents

    Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    Children

    Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

    Hepatic Impairment

    No dosage adjustment recommendations are available. Salsalate discontinuation is recommended for patients who develop signs or symptoms of hepatic disease.

    Renal Impairment

    Dosage should be modified depending on clinical response, salicylate concentrations, and degree of renal impairment (see Contraindications), but no quantitative recommendations are available. Salsalate discontinuation is recommended for patients who develop signs or symptoms of renal disease.
     
    Intermittent hemodialysis
    The following dose has been recommended: 750 mg PO twice daily between dialysis sessions and 500 mg PO after dialysis; periodic plasma salicylic acid concentration monitoring is advisable.

    ADMINISTRATION

    Oral Administration

    Administer salsalate orally with a full glass of water. Food or milk may minimize GI upset.

    STORAGE

    Amigesic :
    - Store between 68 to 77 degrees F, excursions permitted 59 to 86 degrees F
    Argesic-SA :
    - Store between 68 to 77 degrees F, excursions permitted 59 to 86 degrees F
    Disalcid:
    - Store between 68 to 77 degrees F, excursions permitted 59 to 86 degrees F
    Mono Gesic:
    - Store between 68 to 77 degrees F, excursions permitted 59 to 86 degrees F
    Salflex:
    - Store between 68 to 77 degrees F, excursions permitted 59 to 86 degrees F

    CONTRAINDICATIONS / PRECAUTIONS

    Angina, cardiac disease, cerebrovascular disease, dehydration, edema, heart failure, hypertension, hypovolemia, myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, renal disease, renal failure, renal impairment, stroke, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    Salsalate, like all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), may exacerbate hypertension and congestive heart failure (see Adverse Reactions) and may cause an increased risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, which can be fatal. The risk may increase with duration of use, and patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors for cardiovascular disease (e.g., high blood pressure) may be at greater risk. Caution is recommended when administering salsalate to patients with cardiac disease, angina, peripheral vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease (e.g., stroke, transient ischemic attack), pre-existing renal disease, fluid retention, hypertension, or edema. Salicylates should be used with caution in patients with renal impairment and with extreme caution, if at all, in patients with advanced, chronic renal failure, as salicylic acid and its metabolites are excreted in the urine (see Pharmacokinetics). Patients with renal impairment may be at increased risk of developing nephrotoxicity due to salicylate therapy. Renal function should be monitored periodically in patients receiving prolonged or high-dose salicylate therapy, as nephrotoxicity may occur. Prolonged exposure to high doses of salicylates may cause hypokalemia due to both renal and extrarenal losses. Salicylates should be used cautiously in patients with renal disease or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) due to the risk of decreased glomerular filtration rate in these patients. Renal toxicity has also been seen in patients in whom renal prostaglandins have a compensatory role in the maintenance of renal perfusion. In these patients, administration of an NSAID may cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation and, secondarily, in renal blood flow, which may precipitate overt renal decompensation. Patients at greatest risk of this reaction are those with renal impairment, renal failure, heart failure, liver dysfunction, hypovolemia (dehydration), those taking diuretics and ACE inhibitors, or older patients. Discontinuation of NSAID therapy is usually followed by recovery.

    Coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG)

    Salsalate, like other NSAIDS, is contraindicated for the treatment of peri-operative pain in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). An increased incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke was found through analysis of data regarding the use of a COX-2 selective NSAID for the treatment of pain in the first 10—14 days after CABG surgery.

    Acute bronchospasm, asthma, nasal polyps, NSAID hypersensitivity, salicylate hypersensitivity

    Salsalate is contraindicated in patients with salicylate hypersensitivity or NSAID hypersensitivity who have experienced asthma, urticaria, or other allergic reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs. Severe, rarely fatal, anaphylactoid reactions to salsalate have been reported in such patients. Salsalate should not be used in patients with aspirin-sensitive asthma or the aspirin triad because of the approximate 5% cross-sensitivity that occurs between aspirin and NSAIDs. The triad typically occurs in patients with asthma who experience rhinitis with or without nasal polyps or who experience severe, potentially fatal, acute bronchospasm after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs. However, salsalate is less likely than aspirin to induce asthma in aspirin-sensitive patients. Among 10 patients with confirmed asthmatic reactions to aspirin, 2 had an asthmatic reaction after 2000 mg PO of salsalate; the reaction was confirmed by a second salsalate challenge.

    Alcoholism, anemia, anticoagulant therapy, corticosteroid therapy, esophagitis, gastritis, GI bleeding, GI disease, GI perforation, peptic ulcer disease, tobacco smoking

    Salsalate can cause gastritis, ulceration with or without GI perforation, and/or GI bleeding, which can occur at any time, often without preceding symptoms. Non-acetylated salicylates should be used with extreme caution in patients with a history of or active GI disease including erosive gastritis, esophagitis, GI bleeding, peptic ulcer disease, or previous NSAID-induced bleeding. Patients at increased risk for NSAID-induced GI bleeding include those receiving concurrent myelosuppressive chemotherapy, corticosteroid therapy, or anticoagulant therapy, tobacco smoking patients, and patients with alcoholism. Older patients seem to tolerate GI ulceration or bleeding less well than younger patients. Most fatal GI events occur in older or debilitated patients. In patients who develop gastric or duodenal ulcers during salicylate treatment, the drug should be discontinued due to an increased risk of bleeding and/or perforation. Anemia may be exacerbated during salicylate therapy due to GI blood loss. Hematocrit should be monitored periodically in patients receiving prolonged or high-dose salicylate therapy, as iron deficiency anemia may occur. Patients should not receive salicylates if they consume 3 or more alcoholic beverages per day because of the potential increased risk for GI bleeding. Closely monitor all patients for potential GI ulceration and bleeding (see Adverse Reactions).

    Coagulopathy, G6PD deficiency, hemophilia, hepatic disease, hypoprothrombinemia, jaundice, thrombolytic therapy, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), vitamin K deficiency

    Carefully monitor patients with hypoprothrombinemia, vitamin K deficiency, coagulopathy (e.g., hemophilia), severe hepatic impairment due to hepatic disease, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), or patients receiving anticoagulant therapy or thrombolytic therapy (see Drug Interactions) who take salsalate. If salicylate therapy is required, non-acetylated salicylates are preferred in these patients because of the lack of platelet effects. No changes in bleeding time or in platelet aggregation response to adenosine diphosphate or collagen occurred in either healthy patients or patients with hemophilia A who got salsalate. As salicylates may cause or aggravate hemolysis in patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency or rare variants of G6PD deficiency, these drugs should be avoided in these patients. Because of an increased risk of hepatotoxicity, liver function tests should be monitored in patients who are receiving high doses of salicylates and have juvenile arthritis, rheumatic fever, or pre-existing hepatic disease/impairment. Salsalate should be discontinued if elevated hepatic enzymes persist or worsen or if signs or symptoms of hepatic disease such as jaundice develop (see Adverse Reactions).

    Bone marrow suppression, immunosuppression, infection, neutropenia

    Salsalate should be used with caution in patients with immunosuppression or neutropenia following myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Salicylates may mask the signs of infection such as fever or pain in patients with bone marrow suppression.

    Geriatric

    Geriatric patients may be at increased risk of salicylate toxicity possibly due to decreased renal function. Elderly patients seem to tolerate GI ulceration or bleeding less well than younger individuals and many spontaneous reports of fatal GI events are in this population. Elderly patients at the highest risk for the development of gastric or duodenal ulcers are those using both NSAIDs and corticosteroids, with a prior history of peptic ulcer disease or NSAID-related GI bleeding, high-dose NSAID therapy, complaints of dyspepsia, and those with concurrent disease states that increase their risk of mortality from a GI bleed or perforation. Elderly patients are more likely to have concomitant disease states that may exacerbate salicylate-induced renal changes. Care should be taken in dose selection and the lowest effective dose should be used in patients at risk. After initiating salicylate therapy, such as salsalate, elderly patients should be monitored for the development of pedal edema, rales, blood pressure elevation, or changes in creatinine or BUN concentrations. Monitoring of stool for occult blood, serum magnesium and potassium concentrations, and a complete blood count should be considered at baseline and periodically during chronic salicylate therapy. The federal Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) regulates medication use in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). According to OBRA, Salicylates should be reserved for symptoms and/or inflammatory conditions for which lower risk analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen) have either failed, or are not clinically indicated. Salicylates may cause GI bleeding in patients with a prior history of, or with increased risk for, GI bleeding. In addition, salicylates may cause or worsen renal failure, increase blood pressure, or exacerbate heart failure.

    Ascites

    Sodium-restricted patients or patients with hypovolemic states (e.g., ascites, dehydration, heart failure, hypertension, or hypovolemia) may be more susceptible to adverse renal effects of salicylate therapy, like salsalate. In patients with carditis, high doses of salicylates may precipitate congestive heart failure or pulmonary edema.

    Acid/base imbalance, metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, respiratory acidosis, respiratory alkalosis

    The respiratory effects of salicylates, such as salsalate, may contribute to serious acid/base imbalance in patients with underlying acid/base disorders (e.g., metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, respiratory acidosis, or respiratory alkalosis) or in overdose situations. Patients who are unable to compensate for salicylate-induced metabolic acidosis (i.e., respiratory response to CO2 is depressed) will develop respiratory acidosis and increased concentrations of plasma CO2.

    Gout, hyperuricemia

    In patients with gout, salsalate may increase serum uric acid concentrations, resulting in hyperuricemia, and interfere with the efficacy of uricosuric agents.

    Labor, obstetric delivery, pregnancy

    Salsalate is classified as FDA pregnancy risk category C; there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Salicylic acid does cross the placenta. Salicylates have been shown to be teratogenic and embryocidal in animals. Due to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, adverse effects to the fetus, such as premature closure of the ductus arteriosus, can occur. Salicylates should be avoided during the last 3 months of pregnancy (FDA pregnancy category D) and should only be used at another time during pregnancy if the potential benefits justify the potential risks. Chronic, high-dose salicylate therapy late in pregnancy may result in prolonged labor and obstetric delivery complications. Further, the risk of maternal and fetal hemorrhage may be increased.

    Breast-feeding

    Salsalate excretion in human milk is unknown, but the primary metabolite of salsalate, salicylic acid, is distributed into breast milk, and concentrations of salicylic acid approximate the maternal blood concentration. A breast fed baby might ingest 30—80% as much salicylate per kg of body weight as the mother is taking. Salsalate should, therefore, be administered with caution to women who are breast-feeding their infants. Further, salsalate has not been evaluated by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), however acetaminophen and ibuprofen are classified as usually compatible with breast-feeding and may represent preferable alternatives. Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential infant drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding infant experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally administered drug, healthcare providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

    Children, influenza, Reye's syndrome, varicella, viral infection

    The safety and efficacy of salsalate in children have not been established. Because of the risk of Reye's syndrome, salicylates should not used in febrile children or adolescents until the possibility of influenza-like or varicella infection has been eliminated. Current evidence suggests that acetylated salicylates such as aspirin are associated with this complication; aspirin has been associated with the occurrence of Reye's syndrome when given to children with varicella (chickenpox) or influenza (flu). Although a causal relationship has not been confirmed, most authorities advise against the use of salicylates in children with varicella, influenza, or other viral infection. It is recommended that pediatric patients not be given salicylates for 6 weeks after receiving varicella vaccination.

    Hypothyroidism

    False hypothyroidism based on thyroid function test results may be noted in patients who take salsalate. Salsalate displaces thyroid hormones from transport proteins. Specifically, salsalate (1.5—3 g per day) inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to thyroxine binding globulin. The initial effect is an increase in serum free T4 concentrations, which reduces TSH concentrations and leads to a reduction in T4 and T3. The TSH concentration normalizes, but the T4 and T3 concentrations may remain low. Receipt of salsalate 1000 mg qid for 7 days led to a mean reduction in total T4 of 45%, of free T4 of 39%, of total T3 of 51%, and of free T3 of 50%; reductions of all measurements were significant from baseline from at least day 3 through day 7. However, free T3 and T4 concentrations may be underestimated because of the assay methods. As TSH is an indirect gauge of free T3 and T4 concentrations and because TSH concentrations were never below the normal range and were only significantly lower from baseline on days 2 and 3, use of the TSH concentration may be best screening test for thyroid disease in a patient who is taking salsalate.

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Severe

    peptic ulcer / Delayed / Incidence not known
    GI bleeding / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hearing loss / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hepatic necrosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    erythema nodosum / Delayed / Incidence not known
    bronchospasm / Rapid / Incidence not known
    anaphylactoid reactions / Rapid / Incidence not known
    angioedema / Rapid / Incidence not known
    azotemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    proteinuria / Delayed / Incidence not known
    renal tubular necrosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    renal papillary necrosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    pulmonary edema / Early / Incidence not known
    seizures / Delayed / Incidence not known
    visual impairment / Early / Incidence not known
    pancytopenia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    agranulocytosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) / Delayed / Incidence not known
    aplastic anemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    Reye's syndrome / Delayed / Incidence not known
    stroke / Early / Incidence not known
    myocardial infarction / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Moderate

    gastritis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    anemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    constipation / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypertension / Early / Incidence not known
    encephalopathy / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hepatitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hyperbilirubinemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypoprothrombinemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    elevated hepatic enzymes / Delayed / Incidence not known
    jaundice / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hyperuricemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    dehydration / Delayed / Incidence not known
    respiratory depression / Rapid / Incidence not known
    hypoglycemia / Early / Incidence not known
    metabolic acidosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypokalemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypernatremia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hyperglycemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hallucinations / Early / Incidence not known
    confusion / Early / Incidence not known
    wheezing / Rapid / Incidence not known
    leukopenia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    thrombocytopenia / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Mild

    nausea / Early / Incidence not known
    pyrosis (heartburn) / Early / Incidence not known
    abdominal pain / Early / Incidence not known
    diarrhea / Early / Incidence not known
    vomiting / Early / Incidence not known
    tinnitus / Delayed / Incidence not known
    rash (unspecified) / Early / Incidence not known
    pruritus / Rapid / Incidence not known
    acneiform rash / Delayed / Incidence not known
    maculopapular rash / Early / Incidence not known
    urticaria / Rapid / Incidence not known
    diaphoresis / Early / Incidence not known
    hyperventilation / Early / Incidence not known
    vertigo / Early / Incidence not known
    fever / Early / Incidence not known
    lethargy / Early / Incidence not known
    headache / Early / Incidence not known
    drowsiness / Early / Incidence not known
    dizziness / Early / Incidence not known
    purpura / Delayed / Incidence not known
    leukocytosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    lichen planus-like eruption / Delayed / Incidence not known

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Acetaminophen: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Butalbital: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Magnesium Salicylate; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Phenyltoloxamine; Salicylamide: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Codeine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Doxylamine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Dichloralphenazone; Isometheptene: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Diphenhydramine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Oxycodone: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Pentazocine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Propoxyphene: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetaminophen; Tramadol: (Moderate) Prolonged concurrent use of acetaminophen and salicylates is not recommended. Although salicylates are rarely associated with nephrotoxicity, high-dose, chronic administration of salicylates combined other analgesics, including acetaminophen, significantly increases the risk of analgesic nephropathy, renal papillary necrosis, and end-stage renal disease. Additive hepatic toxicity may occur, especially in combined overdose situations. Do not exceed the recommended individual maximum doses when these agents are given concurrently for short-term therapy.
    Acetazolamide: (Major) Avoid the coadministration of high-dose salicylates and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors whenever possible. There were reports of anorexia, tachypnea, lethargy, metabolic acidosis, coma, and death with high-dose aspirin and acetazolamide. Two mechanisms could cause increased acetazolamide concentrations, resulting in CNS depression and metabolic acidosis: first, competition with aspirin for renal tubular secretion and, second, displacement by salicylates from plasma protein binding sites. Additionally, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors alkalinize urine and increase the excretion of normal doses of salicylates; decreased plasma salicylate concentrations may or may not be clinically significant.
    Acetohexamide: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Acidifying Agents: (Moderate) Acidification of the urine may increase serum concentrations of salicylates by increasing tubular reabsorption of salicylates, however, this interaction is not likely to be clinically significant since the urine is normally acidic.
    Aliskiren; Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Aliskiren; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Alkalinizing Agents: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents may increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Alogliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Alogliptin; Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Alogliptin; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Alpha-glucosidase Inhibitors: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Amiloride: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia.
    Amiloride; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Aminoglycosides: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Amlodipine; Benazepril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Olmesartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Valsartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Amphotericin B cholesteryl sulfate complex (ABCD): (Minor) Concurrent use of amphotericin B and other potentially nephrotoxic medications, like the salicylates, may enhance the potential for drug-induced renal toxicity.
    Amphotericin B lipid complex (ABLC): (Minor) Concurrent use of amphotericin B and other potentially nephrotoxic medications, like the salicylates, may enhance the potential for drug-induced renal toxicity.
    Amphotericin B liposomal (LAmB): (Minor) Concurrent use of amphotericin B and other potentially nephrotoxic medications, like the salicylates, may enhance the potential for drug-induced renal toxicity.
    Amphotericin B: (Minor) Concurrent use of amphotericin B and other potentially nephrotoxic medications, like the salicylates, may enhance the potential for drug-induced renal toxicity.
    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Antithrombin III: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates (more than 3 to 4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding. Patients taking large doses of salicylates and antithrombin III should be monitored closely for bleeding.
    Antithymocyte Globulin: (Moderate) An increased risk of bleeding may occur when salicylates are used with agents that cause clinically significant thrombocytopenia due to decreases in platelet aggregation, such as anti-thymocyte immune globulin.
    Apixaban: (Major) Large doses of salicylates (>= 3-4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding. Patients taking large doses of salicylates and apixaban should be monitored closely for bleeding.
    Ardeparin: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving a low molecular weight heparin in combination with other agents known to increase the risk of bleeding such as salicylates. Monitor clinical and laboratory response closely during concurrent use.
    Ascorbic Acid, Vitamin C: (Minor) Agents that acidify the urine should be avoided in patients receiving high-dose salicylates. Urinary pH changes can decrease salicylate excretion. If the urine is acidic prior to administration of an acidifying agent, the interaction should be minimal.
    Atenolol; Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Azilsartan; Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Bacitracin: (Minor) Additive nephrotoxicity may occur with concurrent use of systemic bacitracin and other nephrotoxic agents, including salicylates. Topical administration of any preparation containing bacitracin, especially when applied to large surface areas, also should not be given with other drugs that have a nephrotoxic potential.
    Barbiturates: (Moderate) Due to high protein binding, salicylates could be displaced from binding sites, or could displace other highly protein-bound drugs such as barbiturates. An enhanced effect of the displaced drug may occur.
    Benazepril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Benazepril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Bendroflumethiazide; Nadolol: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Beta-blockers: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with salsalate and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Bisoprolol; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Bromocriptine: (Moderate) Bromocriptine is highly bound to serum proteins. Therefore, it may increase the unbound fraction of other highly protein-bound medications (e.g., salicylates), which may alter their effectiveness and risk for side effects.
    Bumetanide: (Moderate) Salicylates may decrease the diuretic, natriuretic, and antihypertensive actions of diuretics, possibly through inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. Patients receiving loop diuretics and salicylates should be monitored for changes in the effectiveness of their diuretic therapy.
    Calcium Carbonate: (Minor) By increasing urinary pH, calcium carbonate can increase the urinary excretion of salicylates.
    Calcium Carbonate; Magnesium Hydroxide: (Minor) By increasing urinary pH, calcium carbonate can increase the urinary excretion of salicylates.
    Calcium Carbonate; Risedronate: (Minor) By increasing urinary pH, calcium carbonate can increase the urinary excretion of salicylates.
    Calcium; Vitamin D: (Minor) By increasing urinary pH, calcium carbonate can increase the urinary excretion of salicylates.
    Canagliflozin: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Canagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Candesartan; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Capreomycin: (Major) Since capreomycin is eliminated by the kidney, coadministration with other potentially nephrotoxic drugs, including salicylates, may increase serum concentrations of either drug. Theoretically, the chronic coadministration of these drugs may increase the risk of developing nephrotoxicity, even in patients who have normal renal function. Monitor patients for changes in renal function if these drugs are coadministered.
    Captopril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Captopril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Cefixime: (Minor) In vitro, salicylates have displaced cefixime from its protein-binding sites, resulting in a 50% increase in free cefixime levels. The clinical significance of this effect is unclear at this time.
    Cefotetan: (Minor) Cefotetan has been associated with hypoprothrombinemia and may cause additive effects when given concurrently with salicylates.
    Celecoxib: (Major) Use celecoxib and salicylates in combination with caution. Analgesic doses of salicylates with celecoxib is not recommended due to additive gastrointestinal toxicity without additional analgesic benefit. Furthermore, cardioprotective doses of aspirin in combination with celecoxib are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal toxicity. In patients receiving low-dose aspirin with celecoxib over a 9-month period, GI bleeding, perforation, or obstruction was higher compared to patients taking celecoxib only (2.19% for combination vs. 0.78% for celecoxib only). Celecoxib does not exhibit antiplatelet effects and is not a substitute for aspirin when used for cardiovascular prophylaxis. However, there is no consistent evidence that concurrent use of aspirin with celecoxib mitigates the increased risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events associated with NSAID use.
    Chlorothiazide: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Chlorpropamide: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Chlorthalidone; Clonidine: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Chondroitin; Glucosamine: (Minor) Agents that acidify the urine should be avoided in patients receiving high-dose salicylates. Urinary pH changes can decrease salicylate excretion. If the urine is acidic prior to administration of an acidifying agent, the interaction should be minimal.
    Cidofovir: (Severe) The concomitant administration of cidofovir and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as salsalate, is contraindicated due to the potential for increased nephrotoxicity. NSAIDs should be discontinued 7 days prior to beginning cidofovir.
    Citalopram: (Moderate) The combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and aspirin, ASA or other salicylates which affect hemostasis may elevate the risk for an upper GI bleed. SSRIs may inhibit serotonin uptake by platelets, augmenting the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Additionally, aspirin impairs the gastric mucosa defenses by inhibiting prostaglandin formation. A cohort study in > 26,000 patients found that SSRI use alone increased the risk for serious GI bleed by 3.6-fold; when an SSRI was combined with aspirin the risk was increased by > 5-fold. The absolute risk of GI bleed from concomitant therapy with aspirin and a SSRI was low (20/2640 patients) in this cohort study and the clinician may determine that the combined use of these drugs is appropriate.
    Citric Acid; Potassium Citrate: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents may increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance. (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents, like potassium citrate, increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Citric Acid; Potassium Citrate; Sodium Citrate: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents may increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance. (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents, like potassium citrate, increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Citric Acid; Sodium Citrate: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents may increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Cobicistat; Elvitegravir; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate: (Major) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents, like salicylates should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Colistimethate, Colistin, Polymyxin E: (Major) Theoretically, the chronic coadministration of these drugs may increase the risk of developing nephrotoxicity, even in patients who have normal renal function. Monitor patients for changes in renal function if these drugs are coadministered. Since colistimethate sodium is eliminated by the kidney, coadministration with other potentially nephrotoxic drugs, including salicylates, may increase serum concentrations of either drug.
    Collagenase: (Minor) Agents that acidify the urine should be avoided in patients receiving high-dose salicylates. Urinary pH changes can decrease salicylate excretion. If the urine is acidic prior to administration of an acidifying agent, the interaction should be minimal.
    Corticosteroids: (Moderate) Salicylates or NSAIDs should be used cautiously in patients receiving corticosteroids. While there is controversy regarding the ulcerogenic potential of corticosteroids alone, concomitant administration of corticosteroids with aspirin may increase the GI toxicity of aspirin and other non-acetylated salicylates. Withdrawal of corticosteroids can result in increased plasma concentrations of salicylate and possible toxicity. Concomitant use of corticosteroids may increase the risk of adverse GI events due to NSAIDs. Although some patients may need to be given corticosteroids and NSAIDs concomitantly, which can be done successfully for short periods of time without sequelae, prolonged coadministration should be avoided.
    Cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.: (Minor) Agents that acidify the urine should be avoided in patients receiving high-dose salicylates. Urinary pH changes can decrease salicylate excretion. If the urine is acidic prior to administration of an acidifying agent, the interaction should be minimal.
    Cyclosporine: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like cyclosporine may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Dalteparin: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving a low molecular weight heparin in combination with other agents known to increase the risk of bleeding such as salicylates. Monitor clinical and laboratory response closely during concurrent use.
    Dapagliflozin: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Dapagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Dapagliflozin; Saxagliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, decreasing blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving saxagliptin. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Deferasirox: (Moderate) Because gastric ulceration and GI bleeding have been reported in patients taking deferasirox, use caution when coadministering with other drugs known to increase the risk of peptic ulcers or gastric hemorrhage including salicylates.
    Dichlorphenamide: (Moderate) Use dichlorphenamide and salsalate together with caution as both drugs can cause metabolic acidosis. Concurrent use may increase the severity of metabolic acidosis. Measure sodium bicarbonate concentrations at baseline and periodically during dichlorphenamide treatment. If metabolic acidosis occurs or persists, consider reducing the dose or discontinuing dichlorphenamide therapy.
    Diclofenac: (Major) Increased adverse gastrointestinal effects, including gastric ulceration or blood loss, are possible if diclofenac is used with salicylates. The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function.
    Diclofenac; Misoprostol: (Major) Increased adverse gastrointestinal effects, including gastric ulceration or blood loss, are possible if diclofenac is used with salicylates. The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function.
    Diflunisal: (Major) The concurrent use of diflunisal and salicylates is not recommended due to the increased risk of gastrointestinal toxicity with little or no increase in anti-inflammatory efficacy.
    Diphenhydramine; Ibuprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity. The FDA issued an advisory that 400 mg of ibuprofen can interfere with the antiplatelet effects of low dose aspirin (81 mg per day). Routine use of ibuprofen is likely to have the most significant effect. The FDA recommends administering ibuprofen 8 hours before or 30 minutes after aspirin if concurrent therapy is needed. Interactions have been noted between ibuprofen and aspirin, ASA. Concurrent use of chronic ibuprofen therapy (800 mg three times daily) seems to antagonize the inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity and impairment of platelet aggregation by low-dose aspirin (81 mg once daily) per an ex vivo analysis. In this study, diclofenac or rofecoxib therapy, agents with less activity at COX-1 than ibuprofen, did not affect inhibition of platelet aggregation by aspirin. An in vitro study has shown that the antagonism of aspirin platelet inhibition probably involves competition at platelet-derived COX-1 and is related to the NSAIDs' ability to inhibit COX-1 mediated thromboxane B2 production in platelets. Clinically, the interaction may be more dramatic with regular as compared with intermittent ibuprofen usage. Quantification of the risk was determined by the analysis of retrospective data, which may be inaccurate and incomplete. However, a trend towards a greater risk of a second myocardial infarction in the year after the initial event among adults taking daily aspirin was associated with a greater length of ibuprofen exposure.
    Diphenhydramine; Naproxen: (Major) Aspirin, ASA displaces naproxen from binding to albumin and increases naproxen excretion. Due to an increased free fraction of naproxen, increased adverse gastrointestinal effects are possible if naproxen is used with aspirin. In addition, further benefit with use of the two drugs as compared with aspirin monotherapy is not apparent, and antagonism of the irreversible platelet effect of aspirin occurs with concurrent use. The interaction appears to be due to competition at the enzyme active site. Patients who take low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular health may have the beneficial effects of aspirin on platelet function counteracted by naproxen. Concomitant aspirin and naproxen use is not recommended. The use of Naproxen with other salicylates can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Drotrecogin Alfa: (Major) Treatment with drotrecogin alfa should be carefully considered in patients who are receiving or have received salicylates within 7 days. These patients are at increased risk of bleeding during drotrecogin alfa therapy. Caution should be used when drotrecogin alfa is used with any other drugs that affect hemostasis.
    Edoxaban: (Major) Large doses of salicylates (>= 3-4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding. Patients taking large doses of salicylates and edoxaban should be monitored closely for bleeding.
    Efavirenz; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir: (Major) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents, like salicylates should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Empagliflozin: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Empagliflozin; Linagliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents, such as linagliptin. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Empagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Emtricitabine; Rilpivirine; Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate: (Major) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents, like salicylates should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Emtricitabine; Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate: (Major) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents, like salicylates should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Enalapril, Enalaprilat: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Enalapril; Felodipine: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Enalapril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Enoxaparin: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving a low molecular weight heparin in combination with other agents known to increase the risk of bleeding such as salicylates. Monitor clinical and laboratory response closely during concurrent use.
    Eprosartan; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Escitalopram: (Moderate) The combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and aspirin, ASA or other salicylates which affect hemostasis may elevate the risk for an upper GI bleed. SSRIs may inhibit serotonin uptake by platelets, augmenting the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Additionally, aspirin impairs the gastric mucosa defenses by inhibiting prostaglandin formation. A cohort study in > 26,000 patients found that SSRI use alone increased the risk for serious GI bleed by 3.6-fold; when an SSRI was combined with aspirin the risk was increased by > 5-fold. The absolute risk of GI bleed from concomitant therapy with aspirin and a SSRI was low (20/2640 patients) in this cohort study and the clinician may determine that the combined use of these drugs is appropriate.
    Esomeprazole; Naproxen: (Major) Aspirin, ASA displaces naproxen from binding to albumin and increases naproxen excretion. Due to an increased free fraction of naproxen, increased adverse gastrointestinal effects are possible if naproxen is used with aspirin. In addition, further benefit with use of the two drugs as compared with aspirin monotherapy is not apparent, and antagonism of the irreversible platelet effect of aspirin occurs with concurrent use. The interaction appears to be due to competition at the enzyme active site. Patients who take low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular health may have the beneficial effects of aspirin on platelet function counteracted by naproxen. Concomitant aspirin and naproxen use is not recommended. The use of Naproxen with other salicylates can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Ethacrynic Acid: (Moderate) Salicylates may decrease the diuretic, natriuretic, and antihypertensive actions of diuretics, possibly through inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. Patients receiving loop diuretics and salicylates should be monitored for changes in the effectiveness of their diuretic therapy.
    Ethanol: (Major) Concomitant ingestion of ethanol with salicylates, especially aspirin, ASA, increases the risk of developing gastric irritation and GI mucosal bleeding. Ethanol and salicylates are mucosal irritants and aspirin decreases platelet aggregation. Routine ingestion of ethanol and aspirin can cause significant GI bleeding, which may or may not be overt. Even occasional concomitant use of salicylates and ethanol should be avoided. Chronic alcoholism is often associated with hypoprothrombinemia and this condition increases the risk of salicylate-induced bleeding. Patients should be warned regarding the potential for increased risk of GI bleeding if alcohol-containing beverages are taken concurrently with salicylates
    Ethotoin: (Minor) Large doses of salicylates can displace hydantoins from plasma protein-binding sites. Although increased serum concentrations of unbound phenytoin may lead to phenytoin toxicity, the liver may also more rapidly clear unbound drug.
    Etodolac: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Famotidine; Ibuprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity. The FDA issued an advisory that 400 mg of ibuprofen can interfere with the antiplatelet effects of low dose aspirin (81 mg per day). Routine use of ibuprofen is likely to have the most significant effect. The FDA recommends administering ibuprofen 8 hours before or 30 minutes after aspirin if concurrent therapy is needed. Interactions have been noted between ibuprofen and aspirin, ASA. Concurrent use of chronic ibuprofen therapy (800 mg three times daily) seems to antagonize the inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity and impairment of platelet aggregation by low-dose aspirin (81 mg once daily) per an ex vivo analysis. In this study, diclofenac or rofecoxib therapy, agents with less activity at COX-1 than ibuprofen, did not affect inhibition of platelet aggregation by aspirin. An in vitro study has shown that the antagonism of aspirin platelet inhibition probably involves competition at platelet-derived COX-1 and is related to the NSAIDs' ability to inhibit COX-1 mediated thromboxane B2 production in platelets. Clinically, the interaction may be more dramatic with regular as compared with intermittent ibuprofen usage. Quantification of the risk was determined by the analysis of retrospective data, which may be inaccurate and incomplete. However, a trend towards a greater risk of a second myocardial infarction in the year after the initial event among adults taking daily aspirin was associated with a greater length of ibuprofen exposure.
    Fenoprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Flavocoxid, Flavocoxid; Citrated Zinc Bisglycinate: (Major) Because flavocoxid has been associated with isolated cases of occult GI bleeding, additive pharmacodynamic effects may be seen in patients receiving salicylates.
    Fluoxetine: (Moderate) The combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and aspirin, ASA or other salicylates which affect hemostasis may elevate the risk for an upper GI bleed. SSRIs may inhibit serotonin uptake by platelets, augmenting the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Additionally, aspirin impairs the gastric mucosa defenses by inhibiting prostaglandin formation. A cohort study in > 26,000 patients found that SSRI use alone increased the risk for serious GI bleed by 3.6-fold; when an SSRI was combined with aspirin the risk was increased by > 5-fold. The absolute risk of GI bleed from concomitant therapy with aspirin and a SSRI was low (20/2640 patients) in this cohort study and the clinician may determine that the combined use of these drugs is appropriate.
    Fluoxetine; Olanzapine: (Moderate) The combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and aspirin, ASA or other salicylates which affect hemostasis may elevate the risk for an upper GI bleed. SSRIs may inhibit serotonin uptake by platelets, augmenting the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Additionally, aspirin impairs the gastric mucosa defenses by inhibiting prostaglandin formation. A cohort study in > 26,000 patients found that SSRI use alone increased the risk for serious GI bleed by 3.6-fold; when an SSRI was combined with aspirin the risk was increased by > 5-fold. The absolute risk of GI bleed from concomitant therapy with aspirin and a SSRI was low (20/2640 patients) in this cohort study and the clinician may determine that the combined use of these drugs is appropriate.
    Flurbiprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Fluvoxamine: (Moderate) The combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and aspirin, ASA or other salicylates which affect hemostasis may elevate the risk for an upper GI bleed. SSRIs may inhibit serotonin uptake by platelets, augmenting the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Additionally, aspirin impairs the gastric mucosa defenses by inhibiting prostaglandin formation. A cohort study in > 26,000 patients found that SSRI use alone increased the risk for serious GI bleed by 3.6-fold; when an SSRI was combined with aspirin the risk was increased by > 5-fold. The absolute risk of GI bleed from concomitant therapy with aspirin and a SSRI was low (20/2640 patients) in this cohort study and the clinician may determine that the combined use of these drugs is appropriate.
    Fondaparinux: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving platelet inhibitors (e.g. aspirin, ASA) in combination with fondaparinux. Data on the concomitant use of fondaparinux with aspirin are lacking; however, large doses of salicylates (>= 3-4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding.
    Foscarnet: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents, such as foscarnet, may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Fosinopril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Fosinopril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Fosphenytoin: (Minor) Large doses of salicylates can displace phenytoin from plasma protein-binding sites. Although increased serum concentrations of unbound phenytoin may lead to phenytoin toxicity, the liver may also more rapidly clear unbound drug. Fosphenytoin is converted to phenytoin in vivo, so this interaction may also occur with fosphenytoin.
    Furosemide: (Moderate) Salicylates may decrease the diuretic, natriuretic, and antihypertensive actions of diuretics, possibly through inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. Patients receiving loop diuretics and salicylates should be monitored for changes in the effectiveness of their diuretic therapy.
    Gallium Ga 68 Dotatate: (Minor) Mannitol promotes the urinary excretion of salicylates, barbiturates, imipramine, and bromides, and it may be used as an adjunct in patients with severe intoxication of these substances. In addition, salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics because salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance.
    Glimepiride: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Glimepiride; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Glimepiride; Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Glipizide: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Glipizide; Metformin: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control.
    Glyburide: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Glyburide; Metformin: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control.
    Griseofulvin: (Moderate) Concurrent administration of griseofulvin with salicylates may result in decreased salicylate serum concentrations. Caution and close monitoring for changes in the effectiveness of the salicylate are recommended.
    Heparin: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving platelet inhibitors (e.g. aspirin, ASA). Despite the potential drug-drug interaction between aspirin and heparin, heparin is frequently administered in combination with low-dose aspirin therapy to patients who have had an acute myocardial infarction and in other disease states. In addition, large doses of salicylates (>= 3-4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding.
    Hyaluronidase, Recombinant; Immune Globulin: (Moderate) Immune Globulin (IG) products have been reported to be associated with renal dysfunction, acute renal failure, osmotic nephrosis, and death. Patients predisposed to acute renal failure include patients receiving known nephrotoxic drugs like nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and salicylates. Coadminister IG products at the minimum concentration available and the minimum rate of infusion practicable. Also, closely monitor renal function. (Minor) Salicylates, when given in large systemic doses, may render tissues partially resistant to the action of hyaluronidase. Patients receiving these medications may require larger amounts of hyaluronidase for equivalent dispersing effect.
    Hyaluronidase: (Minor) Salicylates, when given in large systemic doses, may render tissues partially resistant to the action of hyaluronidase. Patients receiving these medications may require larger amounts of hyaluronidase for equivalent dispersing effect.
    Hydralazine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Irbesartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Lisinopril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Losartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Methyldopa: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Metoprolol: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Moexipril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Olmesartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Propranolol: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Quinapril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Spironolactone: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Telmisartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Triamterene: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Valsartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrocodone; Ibuprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity. The FDA issued an advisory that 400 mg of ibuprofen can interfere with the antiplatelet effects of low dose aspirin (81 mg per day). Routine use of ibuprofen is likely to have the most significant effect. The FDA recommends administering ibuprofen 8 hours before or 30 minutes after aspirin if concurrent therapy is needed. Interactions have been noted between ibuprofen and aspirin, ASA. Concurrent use of chronic ibuprofen therapy (800 mg three times daily) seems to antagonize the inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity and impairment of platelet aggregation by low-dose aspirin (81 mg once daily) per an ex vivo analysis. In this study, diclofenac or rofecoxib therapy, agents with less activity at COX-1 than ibuprofen, did not affect inhibition of platelet aggregation by aspirin. An in vitro study has shown that the antagonism of aspirin platelet inhibition probably involves competition at platelet-derived COX-1 and is related to the NSAIDs' ability to inhibit COX-1 mediated thromboxane B2 production in platelets. Clinically, the interaction may be more dramatic with regular as compared with intermittent ibuprofen usage. Quantification of the risk was determined by the analysis of retrospective data, which may be inaccurate and incomplete. However, a trend towards a greater risk of a second myocardial infarction in the year after the initial event among adults taking daily aspirin was associated with a greater length of ibuprofen exposure.
    Ibritumomab Tiuxetan: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents may increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Ibuprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity. The FDA issued an advisory that 400 mg of ibuprofen can interfere with the antiplatelet effects of low dose aspirin (81 mg per day). Routine use of ibuprofen is likely to have the most significant effect. The FDA recommends administering ibuprofen 8 hours before or 30 minutes after aspirin if concurrent therapy is needed. Interactions have been noted between ibuprofen and aspirin, ASA. Concurrent use of chronic ibuprofen therapy (800 mg three times daily) seems to antagonize the inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity and impairment of platelet aggregation by low-dose aspirin (81 mg once daily) per an ex vivo analysis. In this study, diclofenac or rofecoxib therapy, agents with less activity at COX-1 than ibuprofen, did not affect inhibition of platelet aggregation by aspirin. An in vitro study has shown that the antagonism of aspirin platelet inhibition probably involves competition at platelet-derived COX-1 and is related to the NSAIDs' ability to inhibit COX-1 mediated thromboxane B2 production in platelets. Clinically, the interaction may be more dramatic with regular as compared with intermittent ibuprofen usage. Quantification of the risk was determined by the analysis of retrospective data, which may be inaccurate and incomplete. However, a trend towards a greater risk of a second myocardial infarction in the year after the initial event among adults taking daily aspirin was associated with a greater length of ibuprofen exposure.
    Ibuprofen; Oxycodone: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity. The FDA issued an advisory that 400 mg of ibuprofen can interfere with the antiplatelet effects of low dose aspirin (81 mg per day). Routine use of ibuprofen is likely to have the most significant effect. The FDA recommends administering ibuprofen 8 hours before or 30 minutes after aspirin if concurrent therapy is needed. Interactions have been noted between ibuprofen and aspirin, ASA. Concurrent use of chronic ibuprofen therapy (800 mg three times daily) seems to antagonize the inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity and impairment of platelet aggregation by low-dose aspirin (81 mg once daily) per an ex vivo analysis. In this study, diclofenac or rofecoxib therapy, agents with less activity at COX-1 than ibuprofen, did not affect inhibition of platelet aggregation by aspirin. An in vitro study has shown that the antagonism of aspirin platelet inhibition probably involves competition at platelet-derived COX-1 and is related to the NSAIDs' ability to inhibit COX-1 mediated thromboxane B2 production in platelets. Clinically, the interaction may be more dramatic with regular as compared with intermittent ibuprofen usage. Quantification of the risk was determined by the analysis of retrospective data, which may be inaccurate and incomplete. However, a trend towards a greater risk of a second myocardial infarction in the year after the initial event among adults taking daily aspirin was associated with a greater length of ibuprofen exposure.
    Ibuprofen; Pseudoephedrine: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity. The FDA issued an advisory that 400 mg of ibuprofen can interfere with the antiplatelet effects of low dose aspirin (81 mg per day). Routine use of ibuprofen is likely to have the most significant effect. The FDA recommends administering ibuprofen 8 hours before or 30 minutes after aspirin if concurrent therapy is needed. Interactions have been noted between ibuprofen and aspirin, ASA. Concurrent use of chronic ibuprofen therapy (800 mg three times daily) seems to antagonize the inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity and impairment of platelet aggregation by low-dose aspirin (81 mg once daily) per an ex vivo analysis. In this study, diclofenac or rofecoxib therapy, agents with less activity at COX-1 than ibuprofen, did not affect inhibition of platelet aggregation by aspirin. An in vitro study has shown that the antagonism of aspirin platelet inhibition probably involves competition at platelet-derived COX-1 and is related to the NSAIDs' ability to inhibit COX-1 mediated thromboxane B2 production in platelets. Clinically, the interaction may be more dramatic with regular as compared with intermittent ibuprofen usage. Quantification of the risk was determined by the analysis of retrospective data, which may be inaccurate and incomplete. However, a trend towards a greater risk of a second myocardial infarction in the year after the initial event among adults taking daily aspirin was associated with a greater length of ibuprofen exposure.
    Immune Globulin IV, IVIG, IGIV: (Moderate) Immune Globulin (IG) products have been reported to be associated with renal dysfunction, acute renal failure, osmotic nephrosis, and death. Patients predisposed to acute renal failure include patients receiving known nephrotoxic drugs like nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and salicylates. Coadminister IG products at the minimum concentration available and the minimum rate of infusion practicable. Also, closely monitor renal function.
    Incretin Mimetics: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents. Monitor blood glucose closely during coadministration.
    Indapamide: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics because salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance.
    Insulins: (Moderate) Use large doses of aspirin cautiously in patients receiving insulin. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia.
    Ketoprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Ketorolac: (Severe) Increased adverse gastrointestinal and other effects are possible if ketorolac is used with salicylates. In addition, concomitant administration of salicylates and ketorolac has resulted in a reduction in protein binding and a two-fold increase in unbound plasma concentrations of ketorolac. As a result, concomitant use of ketorolac and aspirin or any other NSAID is contraindicated. Because ketorolac can cause GI bleeding, inhibit platelet aggregation, and may prolong bleeding time, additive effects may be seen in patients receiving platelet inhibitors (e.g., aspirin), anticoagulants, or thrombolytic agents.
    Lansoprazole; Naproxen: (Major) Aspirin, ASA displaces naproxen from binding to albumin and increases naproxen excretion. Due to an increased free fraction of naproxen, increased adverse gastrointestinal effects are possible if naproxen is used with aspirin. In addition, further benefit with use of the two drugs as compared with aspirin monotherapy is not apparent, and antagonism of the irreversible platelet effect of aspirin occurs with concurrent use. The interaction appears to be due to competition at the enzyme active site. Patients who take low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular health may have the beneficial effects of aspirin on platelet function counteracted by naproxen. Concomitant aspirin and naproxen use is not recommended. The use of Naproxen with other salicylates can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Linagliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents, such as linagliptin.
    Linagliptin; Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents, such as linagliptin.
    Lisinopril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Lithium: (Moderate) NSAIDs interfere with lithium excretion and may lead to elevated lithium serum concentrations. If NSAID therapy is started or stopped in a patient stabilized on lithium, monitor for evidence of lithium toxicity or decreased clinical effects, respectively.
    Loop diuretics: (Moderate) Salicylates may decrease the diuretic, natriuretic, and antihypertensive actions of diuretics, possibly through inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. Patients receiving loop diuretics and salicylates should be monitored for changes in the effectiveness of their diuretic therapy.
    Low Molecular Weight Heparins: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving a low molecular weight heparin in combination with other agents known to increase the risk of bleeding such as salicylates. Monitor clinical and laboratory response closely during concurrent use.
    Mannitol: (Minor) Mannitol promotes the urinary excretion of salicylates, barbiturates, imipramine, and bromides, and it may be used as an adjunct in patients with severe intoxication of these substances. In addition, salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics because salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance.
    Measles Virus; Mumps Virus; Rubella Virus; Varicella Virus Vaccine, Live: (Major) No adverse events associated with the use of salicylates after varicella vaccination have been reported. However, the manufacturer of varicella virus vaccine live recommends the avoidance of salicylates or aspirin, ASA use for 6 weeks after vaccination. Reye's syndrome, which exclusively affects children under 15 years old, has been associated with aspirin use following active varicella infection. Vaccination with close clinical monitoring is recommended for children who require therapeutic aspirin, ASA therapy; according to the CDC the use of attenuated, live varicella virus vaccine is thought to present less risk than natural varicella disease to such children.
    Meclofenamate Sodium: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Mefenamic Acid: (Major) Increased adverse gastrointestinal (GI) effects are possible if mefenamic acid is used with salicylates. In addition, concomitant administration of salicylates and mefenamic acid may result in an increase in unbound plasma concentrations of either drug, which could result in greater adverse effects. In general, concomitant use of aspirin and mefenamic acid is not recommended.
    Meglitinides: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of antidiabetic agents. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose or use of greater than maximum recommended daily dosages, salicylates can cause either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients who receive antidiabetic agents.
    Meloxicam: (Major) Additive adverse gastrointestinal (GI) effects are possible if meloxicam is used with salicylates (e.g., aspirin). The concurrent use of aspirin and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) does increase the risk of serious gastrointestinal events. Concomitant administration of aspirin, ASA (3000 mg/day) to healthy volunteers increased the meloxicam AUC by 10% and increased the meloxicam peak plasma concentrations by 24%. Because of its lack of platelet effects, meloxicam is not a substitute for aspirin for cardiovascular prophylaxis.
    Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control.
    Metformin; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Metformin; Repaglinide: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of antidiabetic agents. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose or use of greater than maximum recommended daily dosages, salicylates can cause either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients who receive antidiabetic agents.
    Metformin; Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Metformin; Saxagliptin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, decreasing blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving saxagliptin.
    Metformin; Sitagliptin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, decreasing blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Methazolamide: (Major) Avoid the coadministration of high-dose salicylates and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, like methazolamide, whenever possible. The combination yielded reports of anorexia, tachypnea, lethargy, metabolic acidosis, coma, and death. The mechanism appears to be accumulation of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, resulting in increased CNS depression and metabolic acidosis. The acidosis may allow greater CNS penetration of the salicylate.
    Methotrexate: (Severe) Caution should be exercised when salicylates are given in combination with methotrexate. Since both are weak acids, salicylates can impair the renal secretion of methotrexate and increase the risk of methotrexate toxicity. Salicylates can also displace methotrexate from protein-binding sites. Although the risk for drug interactions with methotrexate is greatest during high-dose methotrexate therapy, it has been recommended that any of these drugs be used cautiously with methotrexate even when methotrexate is used in low doses for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. A significantly higher incidence of leukopenia has been reported in patients taking aspirin during methotrexate therapy. In addition, large doses of salicylates (>= 3 to 4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding.
    Methyclothiazide: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Metolazone: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Moexipril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Mycophenolate: (Moderate) Mycophenolic acid is more than 98% bound to albumin. Concurrent use of mycophenolate with salicylates can decrease the protein binding of mycophenolic acid resulting in an increase in the free fraction of MPA. Patients should be observed for increased clinical effects from mycophenolate as well as additive adverse effects.
    Nabumetone: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Naproxen: (Major) Aspirin, ASA displaces naproxen from binding to albumin and increases naproxen excretion. Due to an increased free fraction of naproxen, increased adverse gastrointestinal effects are possible if naproxen is used with aspirin. In addition, further benefit with use of the two drugs as compared with aspirin monotherapy is not apparent, and antagonism of the irreversible platelet effect of aspirin occurs with concurrent use. The interaction appears to be due to competition at the enzyme active site. Patients who take low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular health may have the beneficial effects of aspirin on platelet function counteracted by naproxen. Concomitant aspirin and naproxen use is not recommended. The use of Naproxen with other salicylates can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Naproxen; Pseudoephedrine: (Major) Aspirin, ASA displaces naproxen from binding to albumin and increases naproxen excretion. Due to an increased free fraction of naproxen, increased adverse gastrointestinal effects are possible if naproxen is used with aspirin. In addition, further benefit with use of the two drugs as compared with aspirin monotherapy is not apparent, and antagonism of the irreversible platelet effect of aspirin occurs with concurrent use. The interaction appears to be due to competition at the enzyme active site. Patients who take low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular health may have the beneficial effects of aspirin on platelet function counteracted by naproxen. Concomitant aspirin and naproxen use is not recommended. The use of Naproxen with other salicylates can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Naproxen; Sumatriptan: (Major) Aspirin, ASA displaces naproxen from binding to albumin and increases naproxen excretion. Due to an increased free fraction of naproxen, increased adverse gastrointestinal effects are possible if naproxen is used with aspirin. In addition, further benefit with use of the two drugs as compared with aspirin monotherapy is not apparent, and antagonism of the irreversible platelet effect of aspirin occurs with concurrent use. The interaction appears to be due to competition at the enzyme active site. Patients who take low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular health may have the beneficial effects of aspirin on platelet function counteracted by naproxen. Concomitant aspirin and naproxen use is not recommended. The use of Naproxen with other salicylates can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Nateglinide: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of antidiabetic agents. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose or use of greater than maximum recommended daily dosages, salicylates can cause either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients who receive antidiabetic agents.
    Nilotinib: (Moderate) Nilotinib can cause thrombocytopenia. Large doses of salicylates (3 to 4 g/day or higher) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding.
    Nitazoxanide: (Moderate) The active metabolite of nitazoxanide, tizoxanide, is highly bound to plasma proteins. Caution should be exercised when administering nitazoxanide concurrently with other highly plasma protein-bound drugs with narrow therapeutic indices because competition for binding sites may occur.
    Omeprazole; Sodium Bicarbonate: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents may increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Oxaprozin: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Paroxetine: (Moderate) The combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and aspirin, ASA or other salicylates which affect hemostasis may elevate the risk for an upper GI bleed. SSRIs may inhibit serotonin uptake by platelets, augmenting the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Additionally, aspirin impairs the gastric mucosa defenses by inhibiting prostaglandin formation. A cohort study in > 26,000 patients found that SSRI use alone increased the risk for serious GI bleed by 3.6-fold; when an SSRI was combined with aspirin the risk was increased by > 5-fold. The absolute risk of GI bleed from concomitant therapy with aspirin and a SSRI was low (20/2640 patients) in this cohort study and the clinician may determine that the combined use of these drugs is appropriate.
    Penicillins: (Minor) Due to high protein binding, salicylates could be displaced from binding sites or could displace other highly protein-bound drugs such as penicillins. An enhanced effect of the displaced drug may occur.
    Pentosan: (Moderate) Pentosan is a weak anticoagulant. Pentosan has 1/15 the anticoagulant activity of heparin. An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving other platelet inhibitors (e.g. aspirin, ASA) in combination with pentosan. Also, large doses of salicylates (>= 3-4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding.
    Perindopril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Perindopril; Amlodipine: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Phentermine; Topiramate: (Moderate) Concurrent use of topiramate and drugs that affect platelet function such as aspirin, ASA and other salicylates may increase the risk of bleeding. In a pooled analysis of placebo-controlled trials, bleeding was more frequently reported in patients receiving topiramate (4.5%) compared to placebo (2 to 3%). In those with severe bleeding events, patients were often taking drugs that cause thrombocytopenia or affect platelet function or coagulation.
    Phenytoin: (Minor) Large doses of salicylates can displace phenytoin from plasma protein-binding sites. Although increased serum concentrations of unbound phenytoin may lead to phenytoin toxicity, the liver may also more rapidly clear unbound drug. Displacement of phenytoin from binding sites can lead to a decrease in the total phenytoin serum concentration. Close monitoring for excessive phenytoin toxicity or decreased phenytoin efficacy is recommended.
    Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Piroxicam: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Polymyxins: (Major) Theoretically, the chronic coadministration of these drugs may increase the risk of developing nephrotoxicity, even in patients who have normal renal function. Monitor patients for changes in renal function if these drugs are coadministered. Since colistimethate sodium is eliminated by the kidney, coadministration with other potentially nephrotoxic drugs, including salicylates, may increase serum concentrations of either drug.
    Potassium Citrate: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents may increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance. (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents, like potassium citrate, increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Potassium Salts: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents may increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance. (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents, like potassium citrate, increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Potassium-sparing diuretics: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia.
    Pramlintide: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, and thus decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Probenecid: (Severe) Concurrent use of probenecid and salicylates is contraindicated. The uricosuric actions of probenecid are inhibited by salicylates. When probenecid is used to treat hyperuricemia or gout, do not administer with salicylates.
    Psyllium: (Moderate) Psyllium can interfere with the absorption of certain oral drugs if administered concomitantly. For example, psyllium fiber can adsorb salicylates. Per the psyllium manufacturers, administration of other prescribed oral drugs should be separated from the administration of psyllium by at least 2 hours.
    Quinapril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Ramipril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Repaglinide: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of antidiabetic agents. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose or use of greater than maximum recommended daily dosages, salicylates can cause either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients who receive antidiabetic agents.
    Rituximab; Hyaluronidase: (Minor) Salicylates, when given in large systemic doses, may render tissues partially resistant to the action of hyaluronidase. Patients receiving these medications may require larger amounts of hyaluronidase for equivalent dispersing effect.
    Rivaroxaban: (Major) Salicylates such as aspirin are known to increase bleeding, and bleeding risk may be increased when these drugs are used concomitantly with rivaroxaban. The safety of long-term concomitant use of these drugs has not been studied. Promptly evaluate any signs or symptoms of blood loss if patients are treated concomitantly with salicylates. In a single-dose drug interaction study, no pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions were observed after concomitant administration of naproxen or acetylsalicylic acid with rivaroxaban.
    Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Salicylic Acid: (Moderate) Concomitant use of salicylic acid with other drugs which may contribute to elevated serum salicylate levels (e.g., oral aspirin or other oral salicylates and other salicylate containing medications, such as sports injury creams) should be avoided. Concurrent use may result in excessive exposure to salicylic acid. Consider replacing aspirin therapy with an alternative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent that is not salicylate based where appropriate.
    Saxagliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, decreasing blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving saxagliptin.
    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: (Moderate) The combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and aspirin, ASA or other salicylates which affect hemostasis may elevate the risk for an upper GI bleed. SSRIs may inhibit serotonin uptake by platelets, augmenting the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Additionally, aspirin impairs the gastric mucosa defenses by inhibiting prostaglandin formation. A cohort study in > 26,000 patients found that SSRI use alone increased the risk for serious GI bleed by 3.6-fold; when an SSRI was combined with aspirin the risk was increased by > 5-fold. The absolute risk of GI bleed from concomitant therapy with aspirin and a SSRI was low (20/2640 patients) in this cohort study and the clinician may determine that the combined use of these drugs is appropriate.
    Serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors: (Moderate) Platelet aggregation may be impaired by serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) due to platelet serotonin depletion, possibly increasing the risk of a bleeding complication (e.g., gastrointestinal bleeding, ecchymoses, epistaxis, hematomas, petechiae, hemorrhage) in patients receiving aspirin, ASA or other salicylates which affect hemostasis. Patients should be instructed to monitor for signs and symptoms of bleeding while taking an SNRI with medications which impair platelet function and to promptly report any bleeding events to the practitioner.
    Sertraline: (Moderate) The combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and aspirin, ASA or other salicylates which affect hemostasis may elevate the risk for an upper GI bleed. SSRIs may inhibit serotonin uptake by platelets, augmenting the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Additionally, aspirin impairs the gastric mucosa defenses by inhibiting prostaglandin formation. A cohort study in > 26,000 patients found that SSRI use alone increased the risk for serious GI bleed by 3.6-fold; when an SSRI was combined with aspirin the risk was increased by > 5-fold. The absolute risk of GI bleed from concomitant therapy with aspirin and a SSRI was low (20/2640 patients) in this cohort study and the clinician may determine that the combined use of these drugs is appropriate.
    Simvastatin; Sitagliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, decreasing blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Sitagliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, decreasing blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Sodium Bicarbonate: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents may increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Sodium Hyaluronate, Hyaluronic Acid: (Moderate) Increased bruising or bleeding at the injection site may occur when using hyaluronate sodium with salicylates, especially if used within the 3 weeks prior to the procedure.
    Sodium Lactate: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents may increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Sodium Thiosulfate; Salicylic Acid: (Moderate) Concomitant use of salicylic acid with other drugs which may contribute to elevated serum salicylate levels (e.g., oral aspirin or other oral salicylates and other salicylate containing medications, such as sports injury creams) should be avoided. Concurrent use may result in excessive exposure to salicylic acid. Consider replacing aspirin therapy with an alternative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent that is not salicylate based where appropriate.
    Spironolactone: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia.
    Sulfinpyrazone: (Major) Salicylates should not be used concurrently with probenecid or sulfinpyrazone when these are used to treat hyperuricemia or gout because the uricosuric effect can be decreased. In addition, probenecid and sulfinpyrazone can decrease salicylic acid excretion leading to increased plasma concentration.
    Sulfonamides: (Minor) Due to high protein binding, salicylates could be displaced from binding sites, or could displace other highly protein-bound drugs such as sulfonamides. An enhanced effect of the displaced drug may occur.
    Sulfonylureas: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Sulindac: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Tacrolimus: (Moderate) Tacrolimus, in the absence of overt renal impairment, may adversely affect renal function. Care should be taken in using tacrolimus with other nephrotoxic drugs, such as salicylates.
    Telavancin: (Minor) Concurrent or sequential use of telavancin with drugs that inhibit renal prostaglandins such as salicylates may lead to additive nephrotoxicity. Closely monitor renal function and adjust telavancin doses based on calculated creatinine clearance.
    Tenofovir Alafenamide: (Moderate) Tenofovir-containing products should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent, such as salicylates. Tenofovir is primarily excreted via the kidneys by a combination of glomerular filtration and active tubular secretion. Coadministration of tenofovir alafenamide with drugs that are eliminated by active tubular secretion may increase concentrations of tenofovir and/or the co-administered drug. Drugs that decrease renal function may also increase concentrations of tenofovir. Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Monitor patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus, and urine glucose and protein.
    Tenofovir, PMPA: (Major) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents, like salicylates should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Thiazide diuretics: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Thiazolidinediones: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Thrombin Inhibitors: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving salicylates (e.g. aspirin, ASA) in combination with thrombin inhibitors. In addition, large doses of salicylates (>= 3-4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may also increase bleeding risk when given with argatroban because of their potential to cause GI bleeding or inhibit platelet aggregation.
    Thrombolytic Agents: (Moderate) Concurrent administration of thrombolytic agents and salicylates may further increase the serious risk of bleeding.
    Tinzaparin: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving a low molecular weight heparin in combination with other agents known to increase the risk of bleeding such as salicylates. Monitor clinical and laboratory response closely during concurrent use.
    Tolazamide: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Tolbutamide: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Tolmetin: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Topiramate: (Moderate) Concurrent use of topiramate and drugs that affect platelet function such as aspirin, ASA and other salicylates may increase the risk of bleeding. In a pooled analysis of placebo-controlled trials, bleeding was more frequently reported in patients receiving topiramate (4.5%) compared to placebo (2 to 3%). In those with severe bleeding events, patients were often taking drugs that cause thrombocytopenia or affect platelet function or coagulation.
    Torsemide: (Moderate) Salicylates may decrease the diuretic, natriuretic, and antihypertensive actions of diuretics, possibly through inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. Patients receiving loop diuretics and salicylates should be monitored for changes in the effectiveness of their diuretic therapy.
    Trandolapril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Trandolapril; Verapamil: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Trazodone: (Moderate) The combined use of trazodone and salicylates that affect hemostasis may elevate the risk for an upper GI bleed. Trazodone may inhibit serotonin uptake by platelets, augmenting the antiplatelet effects of salicylates. Additionally, salicylates impair the gastric mucosa defenses by inhibiting prostaglandin formation. It would be prudent for clinicians to monitor the patient's clinical status closely if trazodone is added to or removed from the regimen of a patient stabilized on salicylate therapy.
    Treprostinil: (Moderate) When used concurrently with anticoagulants or platelet inhibitors, treprostinil may increase the risk of bleeding.
    Triamterene: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia.
    Tromethamine: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents may increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Valproic Acid, Divalproex Sodium: (Moderate) Concurrent salicylate therapy can increase the free-fraction of valproic acid, causing possible valproic acid toxicity. Valproic acid levels should be monitored when these agents are used concomitantly.
    Vancomycin: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents, such as vancomycin, may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Varicella-Zoster Virus Vaccine, Live: (Major) No adverse events associated with the use of salicylates after varicella vaccination have been reported. However, the manufacturer of varicella virus vaccine live recommends the avoidance of salicylates or aspirin, ASA use for 6 weeks after vaccination. Reye's syndrome, which exclusively affects children under 15 years old, has been associated with aspirin use following active varicella infection. Vaccination with close clinical monitoring is recommended for children who require therapeutic aspirin, ASA therapy; according to the CDC the use of attenuated, live varicella virus vaccine is thought to present less risk than natural varicella disease to such children.
    Vilazodone: (Moderate) Patients should be instructed to monitor for signs and symptoms of bleeding while taking vilazodone concurrently with salicylates or other platelet inhibitors and to promptly report any bleeding events to the practitioner. Platelet aggregation may be impaired by vilazodone due to platelet serotonin depletion, possibly increasing the risk of a bleeding complication (e.g., gastrointestinal bleeding, ecchymoses, epistaxis, hematomas, petechiae, hemorrhage) in patients receiving platelet inhibitors (e.g., aspirin, cilostazol, clopidogrel, dipyridamole, ticlopidine, platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors).
    Vortioxetine: (Moderate) Platelet aggregation may be impaired by vortioxetine due to platelet serotonin depletion, possibly increasing the risk of a bleeding complication (e.g., gastrointestinal bleeding, ecchymoses, epistaxis, hematomas, petechiae, hemorrhage) in patients receiving aspirin, ASA or other salicylates. Bleeding events related to drugs that inhibit serotonin reuptake have ranged from ecchymosis to life-threatening hemorrhages. Patients should be instructed to monitor for signs and symptoms of bleeding while taking vortioxetine concurrently with aspirin products and to promptly report any bleeding events to the practitioner.
    Warfarin: (Moderate) Coadministration of salicylates and warfarin may result in an increased risk of bleeding. Salicylates may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding, also has been reported with salicylates. Non-acetylated salicylates do not appear to affect platelet aggregation in the same manner as aspirin and are associated with a lower risk of bleeding when given currently with warfarin. If salicylates and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding.

    PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

    Pregnancy

    Salsalate is classified as FDA pregnancy risk category C; there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Salicylic acid does cross the placenta. Salicylates have been shown to be teratogenic and embryocidal in animals. Due to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, adverse effects to the fetus, such as premature closure of the ductus arteriosus, can occur. Salicylates should be avoided during the last 3 months of pregnancy (FDA pregnancy category D) and should only be used at another time during pregnancy if the potential benefits justify the potential risks. Chronic, high-dose salicylate therapy late in pregnancy may result in prolonged labor and obstetric delivery complications. Further, the risk of maternal and fetal hemorrhage may be increased.

    MECHANISM OF ACTION

    Mechanism of Action: The activity of salsalate is due to ionized salicylic acid. Salicylic acid inhibits prostaglandin synthesis possibly by reversibly inhibiting cyclooxygenase (COX), although the exact mechanism of this inhibition has not been established for salicylates other than aspirin. Salicylic acid has little or no ability to inhibit COX in vitro, but is as active as aspirin in vivo in decreasing prostaglandin synthesis. The exact mechanism of prostaglandin inhibition by salicylic acid is unclear; however, salicylates produce the majority of classic NSAID effects. Theories regarding the potential mechanism for salicylic acid include inactivation of transcriptional regulatory proteins (e.g., NF-kappaB), which regulate expression of inflammatory proteins including COX. Cyclooxygenase is responsible for the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandin G2 (PGG2), the first step in prostaglandin synthesis and precursor to prostaglandins of the E and F series. Salicylates do not inhibit the peroxidase activity of this enzyme and do not suppress leukotriene synthesis by lipoxygenase pathways.•Antiinflammatory Activity: The antiinflammatory mechanism of the salicylic acid is due to decreased prostaglandin synthesis and possibly by inhibiting the synthesis and/or activity of other mediators of the inflammation response. Salicylates have been shown to inhibit leukocyte migration, inhibit the release of lysosomal enzymes, and to alter the composition, synthesis, and metabolism of mucopolysaccharides of connective tissues. The total serum salicylate levels associated with antiinflammatory activity are 150—300 mcg/ml. In patients with rheumatic fever, some clinicians favor higher levels of salicylate (i.e., 250—350 mcg/ml).•Analgesic Actions: Salicylates are effective in cases where inflammation has caused sensitivity of pain receptors (hyperalgesia). It appears prostaglandins, specifically prostaglandins E and F, are responsible for sensitizing the pain receptors; therefore, salicylates have an indirect analgesic effect by inhibiting the production of further prostaglandins and do not directly affect hyperalgesia or the pain threshold. Salicylates may also interfere with pain perception centrally by activity within the hypothalamus. The total serum salicylate levels associated with analgesic activity are 30—100 mcg/ml.•Antipyretic Actions: Salicylates promote a return to a normal body temperature set point in the hypothalamus by suppressing the synthesis of prostaglandins, specifically PGE2, in circumventricular organs in and near the hypothalamus. Salicylates rarely decrease body temperature in afebrile patients. Paradoxically, toxic doses of salicylates may increase body temperature by increasing oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. The total serum salicylate levels associated with antipyretic activity are 30—100 mcg/ml.•Coagulation Effects: In a dose-dependent fashion, salicylates may interfere with the synthesis of vitamin K dependent clotting factors (e.g., factors VII, IX, and X). This effect is seen primarily at salicylate levels > 300 mcg/ml. The increase in prothrombin time that may be seen is due to a decrease in factor VII that may be corrected by stopping salicylate therapy or administering vitamin K. As opposed to aspirin and diflunisal, non-acetylated salicylates do not exhibit a clinically relevant effect on platelet function.•Gastrointestinal Effects: Adverse gastrointestinal effects may be mediated through decreased prostaglandin synthesis due to inhibition of COX-1. A direct irritant effect on gastric mucosa may also be involved. Salicylates increase the permeability of the gastric mucosa to cations, thus increasing the entry of acid into the mucosa. Salicylates are also known to stimulate the chemoreceptor trigger zone, resulting in nausea and vomiting.•Respiratory Effects: The respiratory effects of salicylates lead to acid/base changes and alterations in electrolyte and water balance. Salicylates stimulate respiration directly and indirectly resulting in respiratory alkalosis. This is caused by a salicylate-induced increase in oxygen consumption, primarily in skeletal muscle, leading to increased carbon dioxide production and respiratory stimulation. Increased alveolar ventilation balances the increased carbon dioxide production; therefore, plasma carbon dioxide (PaCO2) does not change. Salicylate-induced respiratory alkalosis is compensated for by increasing renal excretion of bicarbonate, which is accompanied by increased sodium and potassium excretion. The serum bicarbonate level is then lowered and the serum pH returns to normal (i.e., compensated respiratory alkalosis). However, if the respiratory response to hypercapnia has been depressed (e.g., administration of a barbiturate or opiate agonist), salicylates will cause a significant increase in PaCO2 and respiratory acidosis. Hyperventilation also occurs due to direct stimulation of the respiratory center in the medulla. At high salicylate plasma concentrations (>= 350 mcg/ml), marked hyperventilation will occur, and at serum concentrations of about 500 mcg/ml, hyperpnea will be seen. Finally, at high-therapeutic and at toxic doses, aspirin can affect oxidative phosphorylation, however, this action is insignificant at lower doses. Other changes in acid-base status (e.g., metabolic and respiratory acidosis) and electrolyte and water balance (hypokalemia, hypernatremia, dehydration) may be seen during salicylate intoxication (see Adverse Reactions).•Renal Effects: In addition to changes in sodium and fluid status secondary to acid/base changes, salicylates may decrease renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate, which may be accompanied by water and potassium retention, in sodium-restricted patients and patients with impaired renal function or hypovolemic states. Changes in renal function are due to inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis, which increase renal blood flow and maintain normal renal function. Salicylate-induced renal effects are uncommon in patients with normal renal function.•Uricosuric Effects: Salicylates act on the renal tubules to affect uric acid excretion. Lower doses (e.g., 1—2 g/day) of salicylates inhibit the active secretion of uric acid into the urine via the proximal tubules. However, high doses (> 5 g/day) of salicylates inhibit the tubular reabsorption of uric acid, resulting in a uricosuric effect. Uric acid secretion is not changed at intermediate dosages. While once used for their uricosuric properties, other agents have replaced salicylates for this purpose.•Uterine Effects: Salicylates produce various effects on the uterus due to inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Alleviation of dysmenorrhea may be due to inhibition of prostaglandins of the E and F series. Administration of salicylates late in pregnancy may prolong gestation and labor.•Other Actions: Salicylates have complex actions on carbohydrate and cholesterol metabolism. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. By inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion.

    PHARMACOKINETICS

    Salsalate is given orally.  Salicylic acid crosses the placenta and is excreted in breast milk; it is unknown if unhydrolyzed salsalate is excreted in breast milk. During chronic administration, salicylate concentrations in the fetus may be higher than those in the mother. Protein binding of salicylates to albumin varies with serum salicylic acid and albumin concentrations. At salicylate levels of <= 100 mcg/ml, salicylic acid is 90—95% protein bound; approximately 70—85% protein bound at 100—400 mcg/ml; and only 20—60% protein bound at salicylic acid serum concentrations of > 400 mcg/ml.
     
    Approximately 90% of the circulating salsalate is hydrolyzed to two salicylic acid molecules by esterases present in liver, plasma, intestine, and several other tissues. Salsalate is hydrolyzed more slowly than aspirin. Unlike other salicylates, metabolism of unhydrolyzed salsalate is not capacity-limited; multiple doses are hydrolyzed as extensively as single doses. About 7—13% of a single dose is conjugated to a glucuronide without hydrolysis to salicylic acid; therefore, salsalate provides about 15% less salicylic acid than an equivalent dose of aspirin. The half-life of salsalate is about 1 hour in patients with normal renal and hepatic function. Salsalate is almost completely eliminated in the urine, with < 1% as unchanged drug, 7—13% as salsalate glucuronide, and the remainder as salicylic acid and its metabolites. The excretion of free salicylic acid is variable and depends upon the dose and the urinary pH. In alkaline urine, > 30% of the dose may be eliminated as free salicylic acid, but in acidic urine, only about 2% is eliminated as free salicylic acid.

    Oral Route

    Salsalate is absorbed primarily from the small intestine; it is insoluble in acidic gastric fluid. Food delays the rate of absorption of salsalate. In the small intestine, it is partially hydrolyzed to two molecules of salicylic acid by GI mucosa esterases; although, most salsalate is absorbed unchanged. The amount of unchanged salsalate that reaches the systemic circulation is unknown. In fasting healthy adults receiving a single 1 g oral dose of salsalate tablets, an average peak plasma salicylate concentration of 108 mcg/ml occurred in 3 hours in fasting conditions and an average peak plasma salicylate concentration of 75 mcg/ml occurred within 5 hours in nonfasted conditions. Therapeutic effects may not be observed for 3—4 days when salicylate concentrations reach steady state.