PDR MEMBER LOGIN:
  • PDR Search

    Required field
  • Advertisement
  • CLASSES

    Yellow Fever Vaccines

    DEA CLASS

    Rx

    DESCRIPTION

    Vaccine composed of live, attenuated yellow fever virus
    Approved to prevent yellow fever infection
    Routine vaccination not recommended in US; recommended for travelers to endemic/epidemic areas and laboratory workers with possibility of exposure

    COMMON BRAND NAMES

    YF-Vax

    HOW SUPPLIED

    YF-Vax Subcutaneous Inj Pwd F/Susp: 0.5mL, 4.74pfu

    DOSAGE & INDICATIONS

    For yellow fever prophylaxis.
    NOTE: Routine vaccination against yellow fever is not recommended in the US.
    NOTE: Vaccination against yellow fever is recommended for persons living or traveling to known endemic or epidemic areas (i.e., Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Peru, Venezuela and sub-Saharan Africa), traveler to rural areas of countries that do not report the disease but that lie in the yellow fever endemic zone, and microbiology laboratory employees with exposure to yellow fever virus or to concentrated preparations of the yellow fever vaccine strain.
    Subcutaneous dosage
    Adults, Adolescents, Children, and Infants >= 9 months of age

    A single 0.5 ml subcutaneous injection administered at least 10 days prior to potential exposure. Re-immunization with a 0.5 ml SC dose is recommended every 10 years for persons who are at continued risk of exposure and is required by International Health Regulations.
    NOTE: Desensitization protocol- If immunization is imperative and the individual has a history of severe egg sensitivity and has a positive skin test to the vaccine, the below desensitization procedure may be used to administer the vaccine. The patient needs to be under the direct supervision of a physician experienced in the management of anaphylaxis; immediate availability of emergency equipment is needed. Administer the following successive doses at 15 to 20 minute intervals:
    -0.05 ml SC of 1:10 dilution
    -0.05 ml SC of full strength
    -0.10 ml SC of full strength
    -0.15 ml SC of full strength
    -0.20 ml SC of full strength

    MAXIMUM DOSAGE

    Adults

    0.5 ml/dose SC.

    Geriatric

    0.5 ml/dose SC.

    Adolescents

    0.5 ml/dose SC.

    Children

    0.5 ml/dose SC.

    Infants

    >= 9 months: 0.5 ml/dose SC.
    < 9 months: Use is contraindicated.

    Neonates

    Use is contraindicated.

    DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

    Hepatic Impairment

    Specific guidelines for dosage adjustments in hepatic impairment are not available; it appears that no dosage adjustments are needed.

    Renal Impairment

    Specific guidelines for dosage adjustments in renal impairment are not available; it appears that no dosage adjustments are needed.

    ADMINISTRATION

     
    NOTE: An International Certificate of Vaccination must be completed, signed, and validated with the center's stamp when the vaccine is administered. This certificate must be provided to all vaccinees.
    The US vaccination certificate is valid for a period of 10 years commencing 10 days after initial vaccination or revaccination.
    Instruct travelers to consult the latest published version of Heath Information for International Travel to determine vaccination requirements and regulations. Information may also be obtained from local health departments, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the World Health Organization (WHO).
     
    NOTE: According to U.S. federal laws, the health care provider must record in the patient's permanent record the manufacturer, lot number, administration date, and the name and address of the person administering the vaccine.
    Inform the patient, parent, guardian, or responsible adult of the benefits and risks of the vaccine. Provide the Vaccine Information Statements from the manufacturer to the patient, parent, or guardian before each immunization. The action is required by the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986.
    If the yellow fever vaccine has been previously given, question the patient, parent, or guardian about any symptoms or signs of an adverse reaction.
    Complete a Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) report form if adverse events have been identified. The reporting of events is required by the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986. The toll-free number for VAERS is 1—800—822—7967. Also, report an adverse event to the manufacturer of the specific agent administered. Depending on the adverse reaction, a subsequent dose may be contraindicated (see Contraindications).
    Health care professionals administering vaccines should take appropriate precautions to prevent allergic reactions in vaccine recipients (see Contraindications). The health care professional should have immediate availability of epinephrine (1:1000) injection and other agents used in the treatment of severe anaphylaxis in the event of a serious allergic reaction.

    Injectable Administration

    Administer only via the subcutaneous (SC) route; do not inject intravenously, intramuscularly, or intradermally.
    Visually inspect parenteral products for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration. The reconstituted yellow fever vaccine is a slightly pink-brown suspension. If the suspension is discolored or particulate matter is present, discard the vaccine vial.
    Do not mix yellow fever vaccine with any other vaccine or product in the same syringe.

    Subcutaneous Administration

    Reconstitution:
    Reconstitute using the manufacturer supplied Sodium Chloride Injection USP diluent. The diluent is available as a 0.6 ml vial (for the single dose vaccine vial) and a 3 ml vial (for the 5 dose vaccine vial).
    Withdrawal the diluent into a suitably sized syringe and inject into the corresponding vaccine vial.
    After allowing the reconstituted vaccine to sit for one or two minutes, gently swirl until a uniformed suspension is achieved. Do not vigorously shake.
    Do not further dilute the reconstituted vaccine.
    Administer the reconstituted vaccine within one hour of reconstitution. Dispose of any unused reconstituted vaccine.
     
    Subcutaneous (SC) injection:
    Prior to administration, clean skin over the injection site with a suitable cleansing agent.
    Swirl the reconstituted vaccine vial well before withdrawing each dose.
    Using a sterile syringe and 5/8th to 3/4th-inch long, 23- to 25-gauge needle, inject 0.5 ml of the vaccine subcutaneously.
    A separate syringe and needle MUST be used for each vaccination.

    STORAGE

    YF-Vax:
    - Protect from freezing
    - Refrigerate (between 36 and 46 degrees F)

    CONTRAINDICATIONS / PRECAUTIONS

    Fever

    Use of the yellow fever vaccine, live is contraindicated in persons with an acute illness resulting in fever. Health care providers are advised to withhold the vaccine until such illnesses have resolved. A disease that results in a low-grade fever is usually not a reason to postpone vaccination.

    Egg hypersensitivity

    The yellow fever vaccine, live is contraindicated for use in any person with a previous hypersensitivity to the vaccine or any of the vaccine components. Chicken embryos are used in the production of the yellow fever vaccine. Individuals with a history of acute egg hypersensitivity may develop an anaphylactic reaction after administration of the vaccine; avoid use of the vaccine in these people. If an egg-hypersensitive person must receive the yellow fever vaccine, perform one of the following skin tests prior to vaccine administration: (1) scratch, prick, or puncture test: a 1:10 dilution of the vaccine in saline is placed on a superficial scratch, prick, or puncture on the volar surface of the forearm. Positive (histamine) and negative (saline) controls should also be used. Read the test after 15 to 20 minutes. A wheal of >= 3 mm larger than the saline control is considered a positive test. The histamine control must also be positive for valid interpretation. If the test is negative, perform an intradermal test. (2) intradermal test: Intradermally inject 0.02 mL of a 1:100 dilution of vaccine in saline. Positive and negative controls must also be performed. A wheal of >= 5 mm larger than the negative control, surrounded by erythema, is considered a positive reaction. Desensitization may be considered in those individuals where vaccination is essential despite a positive skin test. Administration of the yellow fever vaccine is not contraindicated, and a skin test is not required, in persons with less severe or local allergies to eggs or feathers or in persons able to eat egg-containing products. With any biologic product, the prescriber or health care professional should take precautions to prevent allergic reactions. The health care professional should have immediate availability of epinephrine (1:1000) injection and other agents used in the treatment of severe anaphylaxis in the event of a serious allergic reaction to the vaccine. Prior to the administration of the vaccine, the health care personnel should inform the patient, parent, guardian, or responsible adult of the benefits and risks to the patient. This should include the provision of the vaccine information statement from the manufacturer. The patient or responsible adult should report any adverse reaction following vaccine administration to the health care professional. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has established a Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) to accept all reports of suspected adverse events after the administration of any vaccine. This includes, but is not limited to, the reporting of events required by the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986. The toll-free number for VAERS is 800-822-7967.

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), agammaglobulinemia, corticosteroid therapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, hypogammaglobulinemia, immunosuppression, leukemia, lymphoma, neoplastic disease, radiation therapy, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)

    Patients suffering significant immunosuppression may be at risk of encephalitis or other serious adverse events following administration of the yellow fever vaccine, live; thus, use of this product is contraindicated in these individuals. The manufacturer recommends immunosuppressed persons avoid travel to yellow fever endemic areas. If travel is unavoidable, these individuals should be advised of the risk, educated on methods for avoiding vector mosquitoes, and supplied a physician vaccination waiver letter. Immunosuppressed persons may include patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID); hypogammaglobulinemia; agammaglobulinemia; altered immune states due to diseases such as leukemia, lymphoma, or generalized neoplastic disease; or an immune system compromised by corticosteroid therapy with greater than physiologic doses, alkylating drugs, antimetabolites, or radiation therapy. Short-term (< 2 weeks) corticosteroid therapy or intra-articular, bursal, or tendon injections with corticosteroids should not be immunosuppressive and, thus, are not contraindicated in yellow fever vaccine recipients. Asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals with recent laboratory verification of immunocompetence, should be offered the vaccine if travel to a yellow fever endemic area cannot be avoided. The seroconversion rate is likely to be reduced in HIV-infected individuals; therefore, documentation of a protective antibody response is recommended prior to travel.

    Myasthenia gravis

    According to the manufacturer, evidence suggests that persons with thymus disorders (i.e., myasthenia gravis, thymoma, or prior thymectomy) are at increased risk for developing yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease; thus, use of the yellow fever vaccine, live in these individuals is contraindicated. Viscerotropic disease is a rapidly progressing, non-specific, febrile illness resulting in multiple organ system failure (see Adverse Drug Reactions). Health care providers are advised to obtain a thorough medical history, including questions regarding thymus disorder, prior to vaccine administration.

    Geriatric

    Based on data from the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS), geriatric patients, ages 65—75 years, are 2.5 times more likely to experience a systemic adverse event following administration of the yellow fever vaccine, live than patients age 25—44 years; therefore, it is recommended to limit vaccination of persons over 65 years to those who are traveling to or residing in known yellow fever endemic or epidemic areas. Furthermore, when vaccinating the elderly, health care providers are advised to evaluate the recipient's health status prior to vaccination and closely monitor for adverse events for up to 10 day after vaccination.

    Infants, neonates

    Use of the yellow fever vaccine, live is contraindicated in neonates and infants less than 9 months of age because of the risk of post-vaccinal encephalitis or vaccine-associated neurotropic disease. The manufacturer recommends these individuals avoid or postpone travel to rural areas in yellow fever endemic zones or to countries experiencing a yellow fever endemic.

    Pregnancy

    The yellow fever vaccine, live is classified as FDA pregnancy risk category C. Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted and it is not known if administration of the vaccine can cause fetal harm or affect the reproductive system. In general, live, attenuated viral vaccines are avoided during pregnancy whenever possible. In two small safety studies involving pregnant women, administration of the yellow fever vaccine was not associated with adverse events affecting the mother or the fetus; however, one study did suggest that transplacental infection with the yellow fever vaccine viruses may occur. Furthermore, pregnant women who received the yellow fever vaccine experienced a significantly lower seroconversion rate when compared against a non-pregnant control group. The yellow fever vaccine, live should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit to the mother justifies the potential risk to the fetus. For advise and for documentation of a protective immune response to the vaccine, contact the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at 970—221—6400.

    Breast-feeding

    According to the manufacturer, there is a theoretical risk of transmitting yellow fever vaccine, live components from the mother to a nursing infant; therefore, breast-feeding is considered a contraindication because of the risk of vaccine-associated encephalitis in infants less than 9 months of age. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) also advises against use of the vaccine in nursing mothers; however, the ACIP does support vaccination of mothers at high risk for acquisition as a result of unavoidable or un-postponable travel to yellow fever endemic areas. Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential infant drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding infant experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally ingested drug, health care providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

    Intramuscular administration, intravenous administration

    The yellow fever vaccine, live is only indicated for subcutaneous administration; do not give via intravenous administration or intramuscular administration. Intradermal use is only for administration of skin test to gauge hypersensitivity. Prior to administration, health care personnel should inform the patient, parent, guardian, or responsible adult of the vaccine's benefits and risks. This should include the provision of the vaccine information statement from the manufacturer. The patient or responsible adult should report any adverse reaction following vaccine administration to the health care provider. The US Department of Health and Human Services has established a Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) to accept all reports of suspected adverse events after the administration of any vaccine. This includes, but is not limited to, the reporting of events required by the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986. The toll-free number for VAERS is 800—822—7967.

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Severe

    anaphylactoid reactions / Rapid / Incidence not known
    bronchospasm / Rapid / Incidence not known
    seizures / Delayed / Incidence not known
    Guillain-Barre syndrome / Delayed / Incidence not known
    rhabdomyolysis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hepatic failure / Delayed / Incidence not known
    renal failure (unspecified) / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Moderate

    erythema / Early / 10.0
    edema / Delayed / 10.0
    paresis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    aphasia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    elevated hepatic enzymes / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hyperbilirubinemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    respiratory depression / Rapid / Incidence not known
    thrombocytopenia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    lymphopenia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    steatosis / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Mild

    asthenia / Delayed / 10.0-30.0
    myalgia / Early / 10.0-30.0
    malaise / Early / 10.0-30.0
    headache / Early / 5.0-30.0
    fever / Early / 0-5.0
    rash (unspecified) / Early / 3.2-3.2
    injection site reaction / Rapid / 10.0
    urticaria / Rapid / Incidence not known

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Abatacept: If possible, administer all needed vaccines before abatacept initiation. Live vaccines should not be given concurrently with abatacept or within 3 months of its discontinuation. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased and adjusted doses or boosters that are more frequent may be required. The immune response to an inactive vaccine may still be suboptimal. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Abciximab: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Adalimumab: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Aldesleukin, IL-2: Aldesleukin, IL-2 is associated with impaired neutrophil function. Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Alefacept: The safety and efficacy of administering attenuated virus vaccines or live vaccines to patients receiving alefacept have not been studied. Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Alemtuzumab: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Alkylating agents: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Alpha interferons: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient, including those receiving Interferon therapy. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Altretamine: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Anakinra: No data are available on the effects of vaccination with live virus vaccines in patients receiving anakinra. Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Anthracyclines: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Antimetabolites: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Antithymocyte Globulin: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Antitumor antibiotics: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Arsenic Trioxide: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Azathioprine: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Basiliximab: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Belatacept: Avoid the use of live vaccines such as the intranasal influenza vaccine; measles/mumps/rubella vaccines, MMR; Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Live, BCG; yellow fever vaccine; oral polio vaccine; varicella virus vaccine live; and TY21a typhoid vaccine during belatacept treatment. Further, inactive vaccine receipt may not illicit an acceptable response; belatacept may blunt the effectiveness of some immunizations. Consult the most current CDC guidances for vaccination recommendations.
    Belimumab: Live vaccines should not be given for 30 days before or concurrently with belimumab, as clinical safety has not been established. No data are available on the secondary transmission of infection from persons receiving live vaccines. Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Bevacizumab: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Bexarotene: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Bortezomib: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Brodalumab: Avoid administration of live vaccines to brodalumab recipients. Before initiation of brodalumab therapy, consider completion of all age appropriate vaccinations per current immunization guidelines. No data are available on the response to live or inactive vaccines in patients receiving brodalumab therapy.
    Busulfan: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Canakinumab: Do not administer live vaccines to a patient who is receiving canakinumab; other vaccination schedules should be complete as recommended prior to initiating canakinumab treatment. No data are available regarding the risk of secondary transmission of infection by live vaccines, and the efficacy and safety of live vaccines have not been established in patients receiving canakinumab. The immune response to vaccines or toxoids may be decreased, as canakinumab may interfere with normal immune response to new antigens. Limited data are available on the effectiveness of vaccination with inactivated antigens in patients receiving canakinumab. Because interleukin-1 blockade may interfere with immune response to infections, it is recommended that prior to initiation of therapy with canakinumab, adult and pediatric patients receive any recommended vaccination (including pneumococcal vaccine and inactivated influenza vaccines).
    Carmustine, BCNU: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Certolizumab pegol: Do not administer live vaccines concurrently with certolizumab. No data are available on the response to vaccinations or to the secondary transmission of infection by live vaccines in patients receiving certolizumab. Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Chlorambucil: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Chloroquine: According to the manufacturer, the yellow fever vaccine, live has been administered concurrently with the antimalarial drug chloroquine. Health care provider should monitor for any impairment in the immunologic response to the yellow fever vaccine when these medications are given concurrently.
    Clofarabine: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system
    Corticosteroids: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system. Children who are receiving high doses of systemic corticosteroids (i.e., greater than or equal to 2 mg/kg prednisone orally per day) for 2 weeks or more may be vaccinated after steroid therapy has been discontinued for at least 3 months in accordance with general recommendations for the use of live-virus vaccines. The CDC has stated that discontinuation of steroids for 1 month prior to varicella virus vaccine live administration may be sufficient. Budesonide may affect the immunogenicity of live vaccines. An open-label study examined the immune responsiveness to varicella vaccine in 243 pediatric asthma patients who were treated with budesonide inhalation suspension 0.251 mg daily (n = 151) or non-corticosteroid asthma therapy (n = 92). The percentage of patients developing a seroprotective antibody titer of at least 5 (gpELISA value) in response to the vaccination was slightly lower in patients treated with budesonide compared to patients treated with non-corticosteroid asthma therapy (85% vs. 90%). Even though no patient treated with budesonide inhalation suspension developed chicken pox because of vaccination, live-virus vaccines should not be given to individuals who are considered to be immunocompromised until more information is available.
    Cyclophosphamide: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Cyclosporine: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Dacarbazine, DTIC: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Dasatinib: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Denileukin Diftitox: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Efalizumab: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Estramustine: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Etanercept: Etanercept has not been found to act as a general immunosuppressant; however, the patient's underlying disease state may result in the immunosuppression. Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune syste
    Fingolimod: Do not administer live vaccines to a patient who is receiving fingolimod or has discontinued the drug in the last 2 months because of the risk of infection. No data are available regarding the risk of secondary transmission of infection by live vaccines, and the efficacy and safety of live vaccines have not been established in patients receiving fingolimod. Before fingolimod initiation, test patients without a history of chickenpox or without vaccination against varicella zoster virus (VZV) for antibodies to VZV. Consider VZV vaccination of antibody-negative patients before fingolimod initiation, and do not start fingolimod for 1 month to allow the full effect of vaccination to occur. In addition to the concerns with live virus vaccines, the immune response to inactive vaccines or toxoids may be decreased, as fingolimod may interfere with normal immune response to new antigens. No data are available on the effectiveness of vaccination with inactivated antigens in patients receiving fingolimod. Vaccination may be less effective during and for up to 2 months after fingolimod discontinuation. For example, as compared with the response of placebo recipients, the capacity to mount a skin delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to Candida and to tetanus toxoid was decreased by approximately 30% among fingolimod 0.5 mg daily recipients. Further, in healthy patients, antigen-specific IgM titers were decreased by 25% in response to pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV-23) immunization as compared with the response by placebo recipients. Similarly, IgG titers were decreased by 50% among fingolimod recipients as compared with placebo.
    Folate analogs: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Gefitinib: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Golimumab: Do not administer live vaccines to golimumab recipients. No data are available on the response to live vaccination or on the risk of infection or infection transmission after the administration. Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Hydroxychloroquine: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Ibritumomab Tiuxetan: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Ifosfamide: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Imatinib, STI-571: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    immunosuppressives: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Infliximab: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Ixabepilone: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Ixekizumab: Do not administer live vaccines to ixekizumab recipients. Before initiation of ixekizumab therapy, consider completion of all age appropriate vaccinations per current immunization guidelines. No data are available on the response to live or inactive vaccines in patients receiving Ixekizumab therapy.
    Lapatinib: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Leflunomide: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Lenalidomide: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Lomustine, CCNU: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Mechlorethamine, Nitrogen Mustard: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Mitotane: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Monoclonal antibodies: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Muromonab-CD3: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Natalizumab: The immune response to vaccines or toxoids may be decreased in patients who receive natalizumab; however, no data are available. Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Natural Antineoplastics: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Nelarabine: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Nilotinib: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Ofatumumab: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Palivizumab: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Panitumumab: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Procarbazine: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Purine analogs: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Rilonacept: Do not administer live vaccines to a patient who is receiving rilonacept. No data are available regarding the use of live vaccines during rilonacept treatment. Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Rituximab: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Secukinumab: Do not administer live vaccines to secukinumab recipients; no data are available regarding the risk of secondary transmission of infection by live vaccines in patients receiving secukinumab. Before initiation of secukinumab therapy, consider completion of all age appropriate vaccinations per current immunization guidelines. Secukinumab recipients may receive inactivated vaccines, but the immune response to vaccines or toxoids may be decreased. Similar antibody responses were seen when healthy individuals who received a single 150 mg dose of secukinumab 2 weeks before vaccination with a non-US approved group C meningococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine and a non-US approved inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine. The efficacy of meningococcal and influenza vaccines has not been evaluated in patients undergoing treatment with secukinumab.
    Sorafenib: Concomitant administration of immunosuppressives such as antineoplastic agents can decrease an individual's immunological response to live vaccines or can result in more extensive vaccine-associated adverse events. Refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of immunosuppressed patients.
    Streptozocin: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Sunitinib: Concomitant administration of immunosuppressives such as antineoplastic agents can decrease an individual's immunological response to live vaccines or can result in more extensive vaccine-associated adverse events. Refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of immunosuppressed patients.
    Taxanes: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Temozolomide: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Temsirolimus: The use of live vaccines should be avoided during treatment with temsirolimus. Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Teriflunomide: Due to the lack of clinical information related to the safety and efficacy of vaccine administration during teriflunomide use, concomitant vaccination with live vaccines is not recommended. The long half-life of teriflunomide should be considered when contemplating administration of a live vaccine after stopping the medication if the teriflunomide drug elimination procedure has not been performed.
    Thalidomide: No data are available on the response to vaccination with live vaccines or on the secondary transmission of infection by live vaccines in patients receiving thalidomide. Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Thiotepa: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Tocilizumab: Do not administer live virus vaccines, as clinical safety has not been established. The safety and efficacy of immunization with any vaccine during tocilizuimab receipt has not been studied. Interleukin-6 inhibition by tocilizumab may interfere with the normal immune response to new antigens.
    Tofacitinib: Do not administer live virus vaccines to patients taking tofacitinib, as no data are available on the secondary transmission of infection by live vaccines. Also, no data are available on the response to vaccination with any vaccine during tofacitinib receipt. Before tofacitinib initiation, review the vaccination status of patients, and update immunizations in agreement with current immunization guidelines.
    Tositumomab: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Trastuzumab: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Tretinoin, ATRA: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Ustekinumab: If possible, administer all recommended vaccines before ustekinumab initiation. Ustekinumab recipients may receive inactive vaccines, but the elicited immune response may be insufficient to prevent disease. Do not administer live vaccines to a ustekinumab recipient. Furthermore, do not administer BCG live vaccines for either 1 year before or 1 year after ustekinumab receipt, due to the infectious risk for Mycobacteria. No data are available on the response to live vaccination or on the risk of infection or infection transmission after the administration of other live vaccines to ustekinumab recipients. Cautious administration of ustekinumab to household contacts of ustekinumab recipients may be warranted due to the potential risk for shedding from the household contact and transmission to the patient. Practitioners should also refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.
    Vorinostat: Live virus vaccines should generally not be administered to an immunosuppressed patient. Live virus vaccines may induce the illness they are intended to prevent and are generally contraindicated for use during immunosuppressive treatment. The immune response of the immunocompromised patient to vaccines may be decreased, even despite alternate vaccination schedules or more frequent booster doses. If immunization is necessary, choose an alternative to live vaccination, or, consider a delay or change in the immunization schedule. Practitioners should refer to the most recent CDC guidelines regarding vaccination of patients who are receiving drugs that adversely affect the immune system.

    PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

    Pregnancy

    The yellow fever vaccine, live is classified as FDA pregnancy risk category C. Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted and it is not known if administration of the vaccine can cause fetal harm or affect the reproductive system. In general, live, attenuated viral vaccines are avoided during pregnancy whenever possible. In two small safety studies involving pregnant women, administration of the yellow fever vaccine was not associated with adverse events affecting the mother or the fetus; however, one study did suggest that transplacental infection with the yellow fever vaccine viruses may occur. Furthermore, pregnant women who received the yellow fever vaccine experienced a significantly lower seroconversion rate when compared against a non-pregnant control group. The yellow fever vaccine, live should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit to the mother justifies the potential risk to the fetus. For advise and for documentation of a protective immune response to the vaccine, contact the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at 970—221—6400.

    According to the manufacturer, there is a theoretical risk of transmitting yellow fever vaccine, live components from the mother to a nursing infant; therefore, breast-feeding is considered a contraindication because of the risk of vaccine-associated encephalitis in infants less than 9 months of age. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) also advises against use of the vaccine in nursing mothers; however, the ACIP does support vaccination of mothers at high risk for acquisition as a result of unavoidable or un-postponable travel to yellow fever endemic areas. Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential infant drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding infant experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally ingested drug, health care providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

    MECHANISM OF ACTION

    The mechanism by which the yellow fever vaccine, live provides protection is not completely understood; however, it is presumed to result from an infection of dermal and subcutaneous tissues near the injection site by live, attenuated viruses. During the vaccine-induced infection, a limited quantity of the attenuated viruses replicate and spread. This limited infection exposes viral antigens to the immune system resulting in rapid and specific humoral immunity against the viral structural proteins. The immune response resulting from vaccination with the yellow fever vaccine is predicted to be identical in quality to that induced by the wild-type infection.
     
    A low viremia is detected in approximately 50% of vaccinees following immunization, and IgM antibodies are detected between 3 to 7 days post-vaccination, reach a peak by 2 weeks postvaccination, and then decline over several months. The neutralizing antibody response is rapid, detected by 7 days postvaccination. The immunity produced is long-lasting. Limited studies indicate immunity may persist for at least 45 years. However, the World Health Organization (WHO) requires booster immunizations every 10 years to maintain protective immunity.

    PHARMACOKINETICS

    The yellow fever vaccine, live is administered subcutaneously. Vaccination does not ensure immunity. The World Health Organization (WHO) considers seroconversion as a log10 neutralization index (LNI) of >= 0.7 as determined by a plaque reduction assay. The plaque reduction assay measures the ability of antibodies with activity against yellow fever to reduce plaque formation in tissue culture cells. During clinical studies, 90% of yellow fever vaccine recipients achieved >= 0.7 LNI titers within 10 days of immunization. In a 2001 study conducted in the US, 99.3% of adults administered the yellow fever vaccine (n = 312) seroconverted with a mean LNI titer of 2.21. The duration of protection is undefined; however, studies suggest immunity persists for at least 30—45 years. Re-immunization is recommended every 10 years for those at continued risk of exposure (see Indications).