PDR MEMBER LOGIN:
  • PDR Search

    Required field
  • Advertisement
  • CLASSES

    Progestogen Only Contraceptives
    Progestogens

    DEA CLASS

    Rx

    DESCRIPTION

    Oral synthetic progestin of low progestational, moderate androgenic, and slight estrogenic activity
    Progestin-only ("mini pill") contraceptive (norethindrone)
    Norethindrone acetate used in females as hormonal therapy of secondary amenorrhea, dysfunctional uterine bleeding or endometriosis, or to reduce endometrial overgrowth in women with an intact uterus receiving estrogen replacement therapy.

    COMMON BRAND NAMES

    Aygestin, Camila, Deblitane 28-Day, Errin, Heather, Jencycla, Jolivette, Lyza, Nor-QD, Nora-BE, Norlyroc, Ortho Micronor, Sharobel 28-Day

    HOW SUPPLIED

    Aygestin/Camila/Deblitane 28-Day/Errin/Heather/Jencycla/Jolivette/Lyza/Nora-BE/Norethindrone/Norethindrone Acetate/Norlyroc/Nor-QD/Ortho Micronor/Sharobel 28-Day Oral Tab: 0.35mg, 5mg

    DOSAGE & INDICATIONS

    For the treatment of secondary amenorrhea or dysfunctional uterine bleeding due to hormonal imbalance in the absence of organic pathology such as submucous fibroids or uterine cancer.
    Oral dosage (norethindrone acetate only)
    Adults and Adolescents

    2.5—10 mg PO once daily for 5—10 days. Withdrawal bleeding usually occurs within 3—7 days after discontinuing norethindrone acetate. The endometrium should be adequately primed with either endogenous or exogenous estrogen. Patients with a past history of recurrent episodes of abnormal uterine bleeding may benefit from planned menstrual cycling with norethindrone acetate.

    For routine contraception.
    NOTE: Ortho-Micronor and NOR-QD are not considered bioequivalent and are not substitutable for each other.
    NOTE: These products have not been studied for and are not indicated for use in emergency contraception.
    Oral dosage (Ortho-Micronor, Errin, Jencycla, or Jolivette norethindrone contraceptive tablets only)
    Adults and Adolescents

    Therapy is usually initiated on day 1 of menses. Take 0.35 mg (1 tablet) PO once daily, beginning on the first day of menses and continuing every day of the year, as indicated by the pack, without interruption. The interval between doses should not exceed 24 hours; missed doses greatly increase the risk of pregnancy. When 1 pill is missed (even if only 3 hours late), the patient should take the missed pill as soon as possible and continue taking a pill each day at the regular time (a backup method of birth control, like a condom or spermicide, should be used for the next 48 hours). Whenever more than 1 dose is missed, additional contraception should adopted for the rest of the cycle, until menses occurs. NOTE: If switching from combined oral contraceptive (OC), initiate norethindrone the day after the last active combined OC pill. Progestin-only pills can be started the day after a miscarriage or abortion. Women who are partially breastfeeding can initiate norethindrone as early as 3 weeks postpartum. If fully breastfeeding, may initiate at 6 weeks postpartum.

    Oral dosage (NOR-QD, Camila, Nora-BE, or Heather norethindrone contraceptive tablets only)
    Adults and Adolescents

    Therapy is usually initiated on day 1 of menses. Take 0.35 mg (1 tablet) PO once daily, beginning on the first day of menses and continuing every day of the year, as indicated by the pack, without interruption. The interval between doses should not exceed 24 hours; missed doses greatly increase the risk of pregnancy. When 1 pill is missed (even if only 3 hours late), the patient should take the missed pill as soon as possible and continue taking a pill each day at the regular time (a backup method of birth control, like a condom or spermicide, should be used for the next 48 hours). Whenever more than 1 dose is missed, additional contraception should adopted for the rest of the cycle, until menses occurs. NOTE: If switching from combined OCs, initiate norethindrone the day after the last active combined OC pill. Progestin-only pills can be started the day after a miscarriage or abortion. Women who are partially breastfeeding can initiate norethindrone as early as 3 weeks postpartum. If fully breastfeeding, may initiate at 6 weeks postpartum.

    For the treatment of endometriosis.
    In combination with leuprolide.
    Oral dosage (norethindrone acetate only)
    Adult females

    5 mg/day PO plus leuprolide 3.75 mg IM once monthly or 11.25 mg IM once every 3 months for 6 months for either initial treatment or retreatment for symptom recurrence. Greater than 1 retreatment period is not recommended and assessment of bone density is recommended before making the decision to re-treat.

    Oral dosage (norethindrone acetate only)
    Adults and Adolescent females

    Initially, 5 mg/day PO for 14 consecutive days then increase dose by 2.5 mg/day every 2 weeks until a maximum dose of 15 mg/day is reached. Continue for 6—9 months or until annoying breakthrough bleeding demands temporary termination.

    For the prevention of endometrial changes associated with estrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal women.
    Oral dosage (norethindrone or norethindrone acetate)
    Adult females with an intact uterus

    2.5 mg PO once daily for regimens where estrogen is administered continuously (withdrawal bleeding not desired) or sequentially (withdrawal bleeding expected).

    MAXIMUM DOSAGE

    Adults

    Dependent on product used and indication for therapy.

    Elderly

    Dependent on product used and indication for therapy.

    Adolescents

    Dependent on product used and indication for therapy.

    Children

    Not indicated in prepubescent females.

    DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

    Hepatic Impairment

    Norethindrone should generally be avoided in patients with hepatic dysfunction.

    Renal Impairment

    Specific guidelines for dosage adjustments in renal impairment are not available; it appears that no dosage adjustments are needed.

    ADMINISTRATION

     
    Instruct patient on risks and warnings associated with hormonal agents (see Patient Information).

    Oral Administration

    Norethindrone may be administered without regard to meals.
    Administer at roughly the same time daily. With progestin-only methods, one pill should be taken every day (without breaks and even throughout menses) for maximum contraceptive efficacy.

    STORAGE

    Aygestin:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Camila:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Deblitane 28-Day:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Errin :
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Heather:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Jencycla:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Jolivette :
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Lyza:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Nora-BE:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Norlyroc:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Nor-QD:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Ortho Micronor:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Sharobel 28-Day:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)

    CONTRAINDICATIONS / PRECAUTIONS

    General Information

    Norethindrone is contraindicated for use in patients with a known norethindrone hypersensitivity or hypersensitivity to any of the components within the drug product.

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection

    Like all hormonal contraceptives, norethindrone use does not protect against the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or other sexually transmitted diseases.

    Hepatic disease

    Hormonal contraceptives have been associated with the development of hepatic tumors. Although this is believed to be an estrogen-mediated effect, progestins such as norethindrone are contraindicated in patients with hepatic disease or hepatic dysfunction.

    Incomplete abortion, vaginal bleeding

    Norethindrone is absolutely contraindicated in undiagnosed abnormal vaginal bleeding or incomplete abortion. Hormonal contraceptives can cause irregular menstrual bleeding in most women. In general, these irregularities diminish with continuing use. Women should be counseled regarding irregular menstrual bleeding.

    Breast cancer

    Norethindrone is contraindicated in patients with pre-existing breast cancer, except as palliative therapy in selected patients. Although progestins reduce the risk of endometrial cancer in patients receiving estrogen replacement therapy, it is unclear whether progestins added to estrogen therapy reduce the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

    Ectopic pregnancy, pregnancy

    Norethindrone is absolutely contraindicated for use during pregnancy or suspected pregnancy. There is no known indication for hormone replacement therapy with norethindrone during pregnancy. Several reports suggest an association between intrauterine exposure to progestational drugs in the first trimester of pregnancy and congenital abnormalities in male and female fetuses. Some progestational drugs induce mild virilization of the external genitalia of female fetuses. In studies of hormonal contraceptives, the continued use of the contraceptive inadvertently for a limited time in the early part of pregnancy prior to detection of the pregnancy has failed to find significant adverse effects on fetal or infant growth and development. No norethindrone product should be used in diagnostic tests for pregnancy. The incidence of ectopic pregnancy during use of progestin-only oral contraceptives is 5 per 1,000 woman-years. Up to 10% of pregnancies reported in clinical studies of progestin-only oral contraceptive users are extrauterine. Although symptoms of ectopic pregnancy should be watched for, a history of ectopic pregnancy need not be considered a contraindication to use of this contraceptive method. Health providers should be alert to the possibility of an ectopic pregnancy in women who become pregnant or complain of lower abdominal pain while taking norethindrone contraception.

    Breast-feeding

    Caution should be exercised when using norethindrone acetate for hormone replacement or other hormonal treatment in lactating women. Progestin-only contraceptives, including norethindrone, are generally considered to be compatible with breast-feeding; available evidence suggests that progestin-only contraceptives pills (POPs) are preferable to other hormonal contraceptives during lactation. Very rarely, adverse effects in the infant have been reported, including jaundice. In general, no adverse effects on breast-feeding performance or on the health, growth, or development of the infant have occurred with norethindrone POPs. Only rarely have there been isolated reports of decreased lactation. Progestins pass into breast milk in low amounts, resulting in steroid levels in infant plasma of 1% to 6% of the levels of maternal plasma. Monitoring of infant weight gain and growth can occur as per usual practices during maternal POP use. Medroxyprogesterone depot contraceptive injection is considered another acceptable progestin-only contraceptive option during lactation.

    Diabetes mellitus

    Norethindrone should be used cautiously in patients with diabetes mellitus. Although the effects appear to be minimal during therapy with progestins, altered glucose tolerance secondary to decreased insulin sensitivity has been reported during hormonal contraceptive therapy. In addition, diabetes mellitus, a risk factor for arterial disease, should be managed appropriately in patients taking norethindrone.

    Hyperlipidemia

    Norethindrone should be used cautiously in patients with hyperlipidemia. Although hyperlipidemia is associated with estrogen-progestin combinations, the effects of progestin-only oral contraceptives on serum lipids have not been studied. Serum lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) should be monitored during therapy with norethindrone. In addition, hyperlipidemia, a risk factor for arterial disease, should be managed appropriately in patients taking norethindrone.

    Cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, thromboembolic disease, thrombophlebitis, tobacco smoking

    Norethindrone progestin-only contraception products should be used cautiously in patients with active or a history of thrombophlebitis or thromboembolic disease. Norethindrone acetate, used for hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) and for non-contraceptive hormonal indications, is contraindicated in patients with active or a history of thromboembolic disease, including cerebrovascular disease or stroke. Although thromboembolic disease is believed to be an estrogen-related effect, studies have shown that patients receiving combined hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) regimens containing progestins may have a higher risk of venous thromboembolic (VTE) disease. Patients with existing coronary artery disease or risk factors for arterial disease including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and obesity should be managed appropriately. Because of the higher risk of thromboembolic disease in tobacco smoking women, women should be advised not to smoke, particularly if they are over the age of 35 years. Despite the caution against use in patients with known thrombotic disease, progestin-only contraceptives are generally the hormonal contraceptives of choice in patients with a potential risk for thrombosis when reliable contraception must be ensured and the risks of hormonal therapy are acceptable; advantages of these methods usually outweigh proven or theoretical risks. When multiple thrombosis risk factors exist, the risk of thromboembolic disease may increase; determine risk vs. benefit for use of the progestin-only contraceptive. The increase in the risk of thrombosis from newer progestin-only contraceptives (e.g., etonogestrel implants) is still substantially less than with combined oral contraceptives containing both estrogen and progestin. For women who are at an increased risk of thromboembolism and have multiple-risk factors for thrombosis (e.g., tobacco smoking woman age 35 and older, diabetes, hypercoagulopathy, severe hypertension, etc.), consider an intrauterine device (IUD) or other estrogen-free contraceptive if appropriate. During use of norethindrone or norethindrone acetate in patients without a history of thrombosis, the provider should be alert to the earliest manifestations of thrombotic disorder (thrombophlebitis, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular disorder such as stroke or focal headache with symptoms consistent with cerebral ischemia, pulmonary embolism, and retinal thrombosis). Should any of these occur or be suspected, norethindrone therapy should be discontinued immediately.

    Asthma, renal disease

    Norethindrone should be prescribed cautiously in patients with asthma and nephrotic syndrome or other renal disease. Hormonal contraceptives can cause fluid retention and may exacerbate any of the above conditions.

    Depression, migraine, seizure disorder

    Norethindrone and norethindrone acetate should be used cautiously in patients with a history of major depression, migraine, or seizure disorder. Progestins may exacerbate these conditions in some patients. If a patient develops focal migraine with symptoms consistent with cerebral ischemia, or, severe headache that may be due to cerebrovascular disease, consider discontinuing the drug.

    Ovarian cyst

    Patients receiving norethindrone may develop an ovarian cyst if follicular development occurs; atresia of the follicle is sometimes delayed and the follicle may continue to grow beyond the size it would attain in a normal cycle. Generally these enlarged follicles disappear spontaneously. Often they are asymptomatic; in some cases patients may experience mild abdominal pain. Rarely, they may twist or rupture, requiring surgical intervention.

    Children

    The safety and efficacy of norethindrone has only been established in females of reproductive age. Safety and efficacy of hormonal birth control is expected to be the same for postpubertal children under the age of 16 and for users 16 years of age and older. Use of hormonal contraceptive products in female children before menarche is not indicated.

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Severe

    optic neuritis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    biliary obstruction / Delayed / Incidence not known
    thromboembolism / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hepatoma / Delayed / Incidence not known
    thrombosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    pulmonary embolism / Delayed / Incidence not known
    retinal thrombosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    anaphylactoid reactions / Rapid / Incidence not known
    anaphylactic shock / Rapid / Incidence not known

    Moderate

    lactation suppression / Early / Incidence not known
    galactorrhea / Delayed / Incidence not known
    vaginitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    cervicitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypercholesterolemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    fluid retention / Delayed / Incidence not known
    edema / Delayed / Incidence not known
    depression / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypertension / Early / Incidence not known
    hepatitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hyperglycemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    elevated hepatic enzymes / Delayed / Incidence not known
    jaundice / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Mild

    insomnia / Early / Incidence not known
    dizziness / Early / Incidence not known
    acne vulgaris / Delayed / Incidence not known
    libido increase / Delayed / Incidence not known
    weight loss / Delayed / Incidence not known
    menstrual irregularity / Delayed / Incidence not known
    musculoskeletal pain / Early / Incidence not known
    alopecia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    appetite stimulation / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hirsutism / Delayed / Incidence not known
    libido decrease / Delayed / Incidence not known
    leukorrhea / Delayed / Incidence not known
    vomiting / Early / Incidence not known
    breakthrough bleeding / Delayed / Incidence not known
    nausea / Early / Incidence not known
    anorexia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    headache / Early / Incidence not known
    mastalgia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    abdominal pain / Early / Incidence not known
    fatigue / Early / Incidence not known
    weight gain / Delayed / Incidence not known
    menorrhagia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    anxiety / Delayed / Incidence not known
    emotional lability / Early / Incidence not known
    rash (unspecified) / Early / Incidence not known
    melasma / Delayed / Incidence not known
    pruritus / Rapid / Incidence not known
    urticaria / Rapid / Incidence not known

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Acetaminophen; Butalbital: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Acetaminophen; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Acetaminophen; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Acetohexamide: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Acitretin: (Major) Acitretin reduces the efficacy of oral progestin only contraceptives. Since Acitretin may cause serious birth defects, the patient should use 2 forms of reliable contraception at the same time for at least 1 month before beginning acitretin therapy, during acitretin therapy, and must continue to use them for at least 3 years after acitretin treatment has stopped. It is recommended that the patient either abstain from sexual intercourse or use 2 reliable kinds of birth control at the same time to prevent unwanted pregnancy.
    Alogliptin: (Minor) Estrogens, progestins, or oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    Alogliptin; Metformin: (Minor) Estrogens, progestins, or oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents like metformin should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. Progestins can impair glucose tolerance.
    Alogliptin; Pioglitazone: (Major) Coadministration of pioglitazone with oral contraceptives can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormonal contraceptives. Higher-dosage oral contraceptive formulations may be needed to increase contraceptive efficacy during pioglitazone use or the use of an alternative or additional method of contraception can be considered. In addition, estrogens, progestins, and oral contraceptives may alter glucose tolerance, necessitating monitoring of blood glucose on hormone initiation. (Minor) Estrogens, progestins, or oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    Alpha-glucosidase Inhibitors: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Amikacin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Aminoglycosides: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Amobarbital: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Amoxicillin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Amoxicillin; Clarithromycin; Lansoprazole: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available. (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available. In addition, drospirenone has antimineralocorticoid effects; the progestin may increase serum potassium. Consider monitoring serum potassium concentrations during the first month of dosing in high-risk patients who take strong CYP3A4 inhibitors long-term and concomitantly. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors include clarithromycin.
    Amoxicillin; Clarithromycin; Omeprazole: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available. (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available. In addition, drospirenone has antimineralocorticoid effects; the progestin may increase serum potassium. Consider monitoring serum potassium concentrations during the first month of dosing in high-risk patients who take strong CYP3A4 inhibitors long-term and concomitantly. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors include clarithromycin.
    Amoxicillin; Clavulanic Acid: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ampicillin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ampicillin; Sulbactam: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Amprenavir: (Major) Progestins may decrease the serum concentrations of amprenavir, which could lead to loss of virologic response and possible viral resistance. Oral contraceptives and non-oral combination contraceptives should not be administered with amprenavir. Alternative methods of non-hormonal contraception are recommended if amprenavir is prescribed. Additionally, data on the effects that other protease inhibitors have on the serum concentrations of estrogens and progestins are complex; some protease inhibitors increase and others decrease the metabolism of hormonal contraceptives. It is not known if amprenavir alters the metabolism of hormonal contraceptives or other estrogen or progestin products. Because hormonal contraceptives do not protect against the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, women who receive hormonal contraceptives concurrently with protease inhibitors should use an additional barrier method of contraception such as condoms.
    Aprepitant, Fosaprepitant: (Major) If aprepitant, fosaprepitant is coadministered with hormonal contraceptives, including hormonal contraceptive devices (skin patches, implants, and hormonal IUDs), use an alternative or back-up non-hormonal method of contraception (e.g., condoms, spermicides) during treatment and for at least 1 month following the last dose of aprepitant, fosaprepitant. The efficacy of progestins may be reduced when coadministered with aprepitant, fosaprepitant and for 28 days after the last dose. The exact mechanism for this interaction has not been described. Progestins are CYP3A4 substrates and aprepitant, fosaprepitant is a CYP3A4 inducer; however, aprepitant, fosaprepitant is also a dose-dependent weak-to-moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor. When administered as an oral 3-day regimen (125mg/80mg/80mg) in combination with ondansetron and dexamethasone, aprepitant decreased trough concentrations of ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone by up to 64% for 3 weeks post-treatment. When ethinyl estradiol and norgestimate were administered on days 1 to 21 and aprepitant (40mg) give as a single dose on day 8, the AUC of ethinyl estradiol decreased by 4% on day 8 and by 29% on day 12; the AUC of norelgestromin increased by 18% on day 8, and decreased by 10% on day 12. Trough concentrations of both ethinyl estradiol and norelgestromin were generally lower after coadministration of aprepitant (40mg) on day 8 compared to administration without aprepitant. Specific studies have not been done with other hormonal contraceptives (e.g., progestins, non-oral combination contraceptives), an alternative or additional non-hormonal method of birth control during treatment and for 28 days after treatment is prudent to avoid potential for contraceptive failure. The clinical significance of this is not known since aprepitant, fosaprepitant is only used intermittently.
    Armodafinil: (Major) Armodafinil may cause failure of oral contraceptives or hormonal contraceptive-containing implants or devices due to induction of CYP3A4 isoenzyme metabolism of estrogens and/or the progestins in these products. Female patients of child-bearing potential should be advised to discuss contraceptive options with their health care provider to prevent unintended pregnancies. An alternative method or an additional method of contraception should be utilized during armodafinil therapy and continued for one month after armodafinil discontinuation.
    Artemether; Lumefantrine: (Major) Although no formal drug interaction studies have been performed, the manufacturer states that artemether; lumefantrine may reduce the effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives, including non-oral combination contraceptives, oral contraceptives, and progestin contraceptives (i.e. norethindrone). This may be due to a CYP3A4 interaction. Artemether; lumefantrine is a substrate and ethinyl estradiol is a substrate/inhibitor of the CYP3A4 isoenzyme. Additional use of a non-hormonal method of birth control is recommended. (Major) Although no formal drug interaction studies have been performed, the manufacturer states that artemether; lumefantrine may reduce the effectiveness of hormonal treatments, including progestin-only contraceptives (e.g., norethindrone). This may be due to a CYP3A4 interaction. Additional use of a non-hormonal method of birth control is recommended when norethindrone is used for birth control. Women receiving norethindrone hormone replacement or contraceptives with artemether; lumefantrine should be instructed to report any breakthrough bleeding or other adverse effects to their prescribers.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Atazanavir: (Major) Atazanavir may decrease the metabolism of oral contraceptives and non-oral combination contraceptives; the mean exposure and minimum serum concentrations of ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone are increased when administered with atazanavir 400 mg daily. However, if atazanavir is boosted with ritonavir, mean exposure of ethinyl estradiol will be decreased; data are limited regarding use of atazanavir with cobicistat. Instruct women to report any breakthrough bleeding or other adverse effects (e.g., insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and acne) to their prescribers. It may be prudent for women who receive hormonal contraceptives with atazanavir boosted with ritonavir or cobicistat to use an additional method of contraception to protect against unwanted pregnancy. Further, because hormonal contraceptives do not protect against the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, HIV-infected women should use an additional barrier method of contraception such as condoms.
    Atazanavir; Cobicistat: (Major) Atazanavir may decrease the metabolism of oral contraceptives and non-oral combination contraceptives; the mean exposure and minimum serum concentrations of ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone are increased when administered with atazanavir 400 mg daily. However, if atazanavir is boosted with ritonavir, mean exposure of ethinyl estradiol will be decreased; data are limited regarding use of atazanavir with cobicistat. Instruct women to report any breakthrough bleeding or other adverse effects (e.g., insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and acne) to their prescribers. It may be prudent for women who receive hormonal contraceptives with atazanavir boosted with ritonavir or cobicistat to use an additional method of contraception to protect against unwanted pregnancy. Further, because hormonal contraceptives do not protect against the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, HIV-infected women should use an additional barrier method of contraception such as condoms. (Major) Consider the benefits and risk of administering antiretroviral regimens containing cobicistat with norethindrone. Insufficient data are available to make dosage recommendations, particularly when cobicistat is combined in other antiviral regimens. It is not clear how cobicistat alters various progestin-only agents used for contraception, fertility or luteal support, or for hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Instruct women to report any breakthrough bleeding or other adverse effects (e.g., insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and acne) to their prescribers. There is a potential for altered efficacy for combined hormonal contraceptives. Consider alternative methods of contraception, such as condoms, to prevent unwanted pregnancy and transmission of HIV/AIDS. When progestins are used for other purposes, monitor for altered clinical response to hormonal therapy.
    Atropine; Hyoscyamine; Phenobarbital; Scopolamine: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Azithromycin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Aztreonam: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Bacitracin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Barbiturates: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Belladonna Alkaloids; Ergotamine; Phenobarbital: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Bexarotene: (Major) Bexarotene capsules may theoretically increase the rate of metabolism and reduce plasma concentrations of substrates metabolized by CYP3A4, including oral contraceptives. It is recommended that two reliable forms of contraception be used simultaneously during oral bexarotene therapy. It is strongly recommended that one of the forms of contraception be non-hormonal. Additionally, because of possible CYP3A4 induction, bexarotene may also decrease the efficacy of hormones used for hormone replacement therapy.
    Bismuth Subcitrate Potassium; Metronidazole; Tetracycline: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Bismuth Subsalicylate; Metronidazole; Tetracycline: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Boceprevir: (Major) Boceprevir reduces the Cmax of norethindrone by 17%, which may be sufficient to decrease the effectiveness of combined oral contraceptives containing less than 1 mg of norethindrone (ethinyl estradiol; norethindrone, ethinyl estradiol; norethindrone acetate, mestranol; norethindrone); concurrent use of these products are contraindicated. Instead, the manufacturer recommends use of contraceptives that contain ethinyl estradiol and at least 1 mg of norethindrone. Boceprevir recipients and their partners are also required to use a second, non-hormonal, form of birth control while on therapy and for at least 6 months after treatment.
    Bosentan: (Severe) Bosentan is a significant inducer of CYP3A hepatic enzymes. Hormonal contraceptives, including oral contraceptives or non-oral combination contraceptives (injectable, transdermal, and implantable contraceptives) may not be reliably effective in the presence of bosentan, since many contraceptive drugs are metabolized by CYP3A4 isoenzymes. There is a possibility of contraceptive failure when bosentan is coadministered with products containing estrogens and/or progestins. In addition, bosentan is teratogenic and is contraindicated during pregnancy. An interaction study has demonstrated that coadministration of bosentan and an oral contraceptive product (ethinyl estradiol; norethindrone) produced average decreases in norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol serum concentrations of 14% and 31%, respectively; however, decreases in drug exposure were are as high as 56% and 66%, respectively, in individual subjects. Hormonal contraceptives should not be used as the sole method to prevent pregnancy in patients receiving bosentan. Effective contraception through additional forms of contraception must be practiced. The manufacturer recommends that follow-up pregnancy tests be obtained monthly for women of childbearing potential taking bosentan. Additionally, estrogens and progestins used for hormone replacement therapy may also be less effective; patients should be monitored for changes in efficacy such as breakthrough bleeding or an increase in hot flashes. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Bromocriptine: (Minor) Bromocriptine is used to restore ovulation and ovarian function in amenorrheic women. Progestins can cause amenorrhea and, therefore, counteract the desired effects of bromocriptine. Concurrent use is not recommended; an alternate form of contraception is recommended during bromocriptine therapy.
    Butabarbital: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Canagliflozin: (Minor) Oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    Canagliflozin; Metformin: (Minor) Oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents like metformin should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. Progestins can impair glucose tolerance.
    Carbamazepine: (Major) Concomitant use of carbamazepine with hormonal products may render the hormonal product less effective. The plasma concentrations of the hormones may be decreased because carbamazepine induces the activity of hepatic metabolic enzymes. Women taking both hormones and hepatic enzyme-inducing drugs should report breakthrough bleeding to their prescribers. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs, or higher-dose hormonal regimens may be indicated where acceptable or applicable as pregnancy has been reported in patients taking the hepatic enzyme inducing drug phenytoin concurrently with hormonal contraceptives. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; if oral contraceptive failure occurs, the additive effects could potentially heighten the risk of neural tube defects in pregnancy. Patients taking progestins for other indications may need to be monitored for reductions in clinical effect of the progestin.
    Carbapenems: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Carbenicillin: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cefaclor: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cefadroxil: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cefazolin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cefdinir: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cefditoren: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cefepime: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cefixime: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cefotaxime: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cefotetan: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cefoxitin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cefpodoxime: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cefprozil: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ceftaroline: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ceftazidime: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ceftazidime; Avibactam: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ceftibuten: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ceftizoxime: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ceftriaxone: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cefuroxime: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Cephalexin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ceritinib: (Moderate) Use caution when combining ceritinib, a time-dependent inhibitor of CYP3A4, with substrates that are primarily metabolized by CYP3A4, such as oral contraceptives, as ethinyl estradiol, mestranol, or progestin exposure may be increased. Females of reproductive potential should avoid becoming pregnant and are instructed to utilize effective contraceptive methods during ceritinib therapy and for at least 2 weeks following completion of therapy. Monitor for hormonal side effects if co-use is necessary to fulfill contraceptive requirements.
    Charcoal: (Major) Note that charcoal exerts a nonspecific effect, and many medications can be adsorbed by activated charcoal; repeat doses may decrease the enterohepatic recycling of some drugs. Activated charcoal dietary supplements may have the potential to reduce the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. Data clearly demonstrating this interaction are not available. Ovulatory potential was studied during the use of two monophasic oral contraceptive pill preparations, after repeated mid-cycle administration of activated charcoal to treat diarrhea in women. None of eleven women ovulated. Repeated charcoal treatment, when administered 3 hours after but at least 12 hours before pill intake, did not alter oral contraceptive efficacy.
    Chenodiol: (Minor) Estrogens and combination hormonal oral contraceptives increase hepatic cholesterol secretion, and encourage cholesterol gallstone formation and hence may theoretically counteract the effectiveness of chenodiol.
    Chloramphenicol: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available. In addition, drospirenone has antimineralocorticoid effects; the progestin may increase serum potassium. Consider monitoring serum potassium concentrations during the first month of dosing in high-risk patients who take strong CYP3A4 inhibitors long-term and concomitantly. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors include chloramphenicol.
    Chlorpropamide: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Ciprofloxacin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Clarithromycin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available. In addition, drospirenone has antimineralocorticoid effects; the progestin may increase serum potassium. Consider monitoring serum potassium concentrations during the first month of dosing in high-risk patients who take strong CYP3A4 inhibitors long-term and concomitantly. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors include clarithromycin.
    Clindamycin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Clobazam: (Major) The addition of non-hormonal forms of contraception are recommended during concurrent use of clobazam and hormonal contraceptives. Concurrent administration of clobazam, a weak CYP3A4 inducer, with estrogens, oral contraceptives (OCs), non-oral combination contraceptives, or progestins may increase the elimination of these hormones. The additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Patients taking these hormones for indications other than contraception may need to be monitored for reduced clinical effect while on clobazam, with dose adjustments made based on clinical efficacy.
    Cobicistat: (Major) Consider the benefits and risk of administering antiretroviral regimens containing cobicistat with norethindrone. Insufficient data are available to make dosage recommendations, particularly when cobicistat is combined in other antiviral regimens. It is not clear how cobicistat alters various progestin-only agents used for contraception, fertility or luteal support, or for hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Instruct women to report any breakthrough bleeding or other adverse effects (e.g., insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and acne) to their prescribers. There is a potential for altered efficacy for combined hormonal contraceptives. Consider alternative methods of contraception, such as condoms, to prevent unwanted pregnancy and transmission of HIV/AIDS. When progestins are used for other purposes, monitor for altered clinical response to hormonal therapy.
    Cobicistat; Elvitegravir; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir Alafenamide: (Major) Consider the benefits and risk of administering antiretroviral regimens containing cobicistat with norethindrone. Insufficient data are available to make dosage recommendations, particularly when cobicistat is combined in other antiviral regimens. It is not clear how cobicistat alters various progestin-only agents used for contraception, fertility or luteal support, or for hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Instruct women to report any breakthrough bleeding or other adverse effects (e.g., insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and acne) to their prescribers. There is a potential for altered efficacy for combined hormonal contraceptives. Consider alternative methods of contraception, such as condoms, to prevent unwanted pregnancy and transmission of HIV/AIDS. When progestins are used for other purposes, monitor for altered clinical response to hormonal therapy. (Moderate) Consider the benefits and risk of administering elvitegravir with ethinyl estradiol; norgestimate and other combination oral contraceptives. Concurrent use may result in elevated norgestimate and reduced ethinyl estradiol serum concentrations. Risk associated with these altered concentrations may include increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, acne, and venous thrombosis. Consider alternative non-hormonal methods of contraception, such as condoms, to prevent unwanted pregnancy and transmission of HIV/AIDS.
    Cobicistat; Elvitegravir; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate: (Major) Consider the benefits and risk of administering antiretroviral regimens containing cobicistat with norethindrone. Insufficient data are available to make dosage recommendations, particularly when cobicistat is combined in other antiviral regimens. It is not clear how cobicistat alters various progestin-only agents used for contraception, fertility or luteal support, or for hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Instruct women to report any breakthrough bleeding or other adverse effects (e.g., insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and acne) to their prescribers. There is a potential for altered efficacy for combined hormonal contraceptives. Consider alternative methods of contraception, such as condoms, to prevent unwanted pregnancy and transmission of HIV/AIDS. When progestins are used for other purposes, monitor for altered clinical response to hormonal therapy. (Moderate) Consider the benefits and risk of administering elvitegravir with ethinyl estradiol; norgestimate and other combination oral contraceptives. Concurrent use may result in elevated norgestimate and reduced ethinyl estradiol serum concentrations. Risk associated with these altered concentrations may include increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, acne, and venous thrombosis. Consider alternative non-hormonal methods of contraception, such as condoms, to prevent unwanted pregnancy and transmission of HIV/AIDS.
    Colistimethate, Colistin, Polymyxin E: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Dabrafenib: (Major) Avoid concomitant use of dabrafenib and hormonal contraceptives; decreased hormonal contraceptive concentrations and loss of efficacy may occur. Use of an alternative non-hormonal contraceptive method of birth control is recommended during treatment for 2 weeks after the last dose of dabrafenib. Dabrafenib is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer and many hormonal contraceptive are CYP3A4 substrates.
    Dalbavancin: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Dapagliflozin: (Minor) Estrogens, progestins, or oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    Dapagliflozin; Metformin: (Minor) Estrogens, progestins, or oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents like metformin should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. Progestins can impair glucose tolerance.
    Dapagliflozin; Saxagliptin: (Minor) Estrogens, progestins, or oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. (Minor) Progestins can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    Daptomycin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Darunavir: (Major) Studies evaluating use of darunavir (boosted with either ritonavir or cobicistat) with norethindrone have not been conducted; therefore, an alternative (non-hormonal) method of contraception is recommended. Taking these drugs together may alter the exposure and serum concentrations of norethindrone. If the drugs must be used together, instruct women to report any breakthrough bleeding or other adverse effects (e.g., insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and acne) to their prescribers. It may be prudent for women who receive hormonal contraceptives with darunavir boosted with ritonavir or cobicistat to use an additional method of contraception to protect against unwanted pregnancy. Further, because hormonal contraceptives do not protect against the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, HIV-infected women should use an additional barrier method of contraception such as condoms.
    Darunavir; Cobicistat: (Major) Consider the benefits and risk of administering antiretroviral regimens containing cobicistat with norethindrone. Insufficient data are available to make dosage recommendations, particularly when cobicistat is combined in other antiviral regimens. It is not clear how cobicistat alters various progestin-only agents used for contraception, fertility or luteal support, or for hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Instruct women to report any breakthrough bleeding or other adverse effects (e.g., insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and acne) to their prescribers. There is a potential for altered efficacy for combined hormonal contraceptives. Consider alternative methods of contraception, such as condoms, to prevent unwanted pregnancy and transmission of HIV/AIDS. When progestins are used for other purposes, monitor for altered clinical response to hormonal therapy. (Major) Studies evaluating use of darunavir (boosted with either ritonavir or cobicistat) with norethindrone have not been conducted; therefore, an alternative (non-hormonal) method of contraception is recommended. Taking these drugs together may alter the exposure and serum concentrations of norethindrone. If the drugs must be used together, instruct women to report any breakthrough bleeding or other adverse effects (e.g., insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and acne) to their prescribers. It may be prudent for women who receive hormonal contraceptives with darunavir boosted with ritonavir or cobicistat to use an additional method of contraception to protect against unwanted pregnancy. Further, because hormonal contraceptives do not protect against the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, HIV-infected women should use an additional barrier method of contraception such as condoms.
    Dasabuvir; Ombitasvir; Paritaprevir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) Many anti-retroviral protease inhibitors may interact with hormonal agents like norethindrone, due to their actions on CYP metabolism, particularly CYP3A4. Data on the effects that protease inhibitors have on the serum concentrations of norethindrone are complex and are based mostly off of data with norethindrone-containing contraceptives. For example, ritonavir (also found in combinations like lopinavir; ritonavir, and used as a booster in many HIV treatment regimens) may decrease the metabolism of norethindrone, raising norethindrone concentrations. Women receiving norethindrone for hormone replacement or contraception should report potential hormonal adverse effects (e.g., bleeding pattern changes, acne, emotional lability) or any changes in efficacy (e.g., noted changes in bleeding patterns) to their prescribers. Because norethindrone-containing contraceptives do not protect against the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, women who receive norethindrone contraception concurrently with ritonavir should use an additional barrier method of contraception such as condoms.
    Deferasirox: (Moderate) The concomitant administratin of midazolam, a CYP3A4 substrate, and deferasirox resulted in a decrease in the peak serum concentration of midazolam by 23% and midazolam exposure by 17% in healthy volunteers. This effect may be even more pronounced in patients. Although not specifically studied, reduced serum concentrations may also occur in patients taking other CYP3A4 substrates such as hormonal combination contraceptives (i.e., oral contraceptives and non-oral combination contraceptives).
    Delafloxacin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Demeclocycline: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Dicloxacillin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Doripenem: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Doxycycline: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Efavirenz: (Major) Patients should be advised to use a reliable method of barrier contraception in addition to oral contraceptives or non-oral combination contraceptives, including implantable etonogestrel, while using efavirenz. Efavirenz has no effect on ethinyl estradiol concentrations, but levels of progestins (norelgestromin and levonorgestrel) can be markedly decreased. Norelgestromin Cmax and AUC decreased by 46% and 64%, respectively. Levonorgestrel Cmax and AUC decreased bu 80% and 83%, respectively. There have been post-marketing reports of contraceptive failure with implantable etonogestrel in efavirenz-exposed patients. Decreased exposure of etonogestrel may be expected. There are no effects of ethinyl estradiol/norgestimate on efavirenz plasma concentrations.
    Efavirenz; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir: (Major) Patients should be advised to use a reliable method of barrier contraception in addition to oral contraceptives or non-oral combination contraceptives, including implantable etonogestrel, while using efavirenz. Efavirenz has no effect on ethinyl estradiol concentrations, but levels of progestins (norelgestromin and levonorgestrel) can be markedly decreased. Norelgestromin Cmax and AUC decreased by 46% and 64%, respectively. Levonorgestrel Cmax and AUC decreased bu 80% and 83%, respectively. There have been post-marketing reports of contraceptive failure with implantable etonogestrel in efavirenz-exposed patients. Decreased exposure of etonogestrel may be expected. There are no effects of ethinyl estradiol/norgestimate on efavirenz plasma concentrations.
    Elvitegravir: (Moderate) Consider the benefits and risk of administering elvitegravir with ethinyl estradiol; norgestimate and other combination oral contraceptives. Concurrent use may result in elevated norgestimate and reduced ethinyl estradiol serum concentrations. Risk associated with these altered concentrations may include increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, acne, and venous thrombosis. Consider alternative non-hormonal methods of contraception, such as condoms, to prevent unwanted pregnancy and transmission of HIV/AIDS.
    Empagliflozin: (Minor) Estrogens, progestins, or oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    Empagliflozin; Linagliptin: (Minor) Estrogens, progestins, or oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. (Minor) Estrogens, progestins, or oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents, such as linagliptin, should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    Empagliflozin; Metformin: (Minor) Estrogens, progestins, or oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents like metformin should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. Progestins can impair glucose tolerance.
    Enasidenib: (Major) Use enasidenib and hormonal contraceptives together with caution; concomitant use may alter hormone contraceptive levels resulting in contraceptive failure. Females of reproductive potential should avoid pregnancy during and for at least 1 month after treatment with enasidenib. Enasidenib is a CYP3A4 inducer and inhibitor in vitro and many oral hormonal contraceptives are metabolized by CYP3A4. Coadministration may result in increased or decreased hormonal contraceptive levels; however, the clinical significance of this potential drug interaction is unknown
    Ertapenem: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Erythromycin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Erythromycin; Sulfisoxazole: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Eslicarbazepine: (Major) Coadministration of eslicarbazepine with oral contraceptives may result in contraceptive failure. Coadministration of eslicarbazepine and ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel has resulted in decreased plasma concentrations of these hormones. Instruct females of child-bearing potential to use additional or non-hormonal contraception during therapy with eslicarbazepine and after treatment has been discontinued for at least one menstrual cycle.
    Felbamate: (Major) Based on very limited data, it appears felbamate can accelerate the clearance of the estrogen component of some oral contraceptives. Patients who experience breakthrough bleeding while receiving these drugs together should notify their prescribers. An alternate or additional form of contraception should be used during concomitant treatment. Additionally, patients taking non-oral combination contraceptives or estrogens or progestins for hormone replacement therapy may also experience reduced clinical efficacy; dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Fidaxomicin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Flibanserin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of flibanserin and multiple weak CYP3A4 inhibitors, including oral contraceptives, may increase flibanserin concentrations, which may increase the risk of flibanserin-induced adverse reactions. Therefore, patients should be monitored for hypotension, syncope, somnolence, or other adverse reactions, and the risks of combination therapy with multiple weak CYP3A4 inhibitors and flibanserin should be discussed with the patient. In one study of 24 healthy women, the effect of 100 mg flibanserin once daily for 2 weeks on the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg/levonorgestrel 150 mcg was evaluated. Flibanserin increased the AUC and Cmax of ethinyl estradiol by 1.09-fold and 1.1-fold, respectively. Flibanserin decreased the levonorgestrel AUC by 1.06-fold. During pre-marketing evaluation of flibanserin, patients who reported using oral contraceptives had a greater incidence of CNS effects than flibenserin-treated patients who did not report oral contraceptive use, including dizziness (13.4% vs. 9.9%), somnolence (12.3% vs. 10.6%), and fatigue (11.4% vs. 7.5%).
    Fosamprenavir: (Major) Clinically significant hepatic transaminase elevations may occur with concomitant use of fosamprenavir, boosted with ritonavir, and oral contraceptives; fosamprenavir should not be coadministered with oral contraceptives. Additionally, hormonal contraceptives, estrogens, and progestins may decrease the serum concentrations of fosamprenavir's active metabolite, amprenavir, which could lead to loss of virologic response and possible viral resistance. Oral contraceptives and non-oral combination contraceptives should not be administered with fosamprenavir. Alternative methods of non-hormonal contraception are recommended. Additionally, data on the effects that other protease inhibitors have on the serum concentrations of estrogens and progestins are complex; some protease inhibitors increase and others decrease the metabolism of hormonal contraceptives. Coadministration of medroxyprogesterone, a CYP3A substrate with fosamprenavir, a strong CYP3A inhibitor should be avoided since it is expected to increase concentrations of medroxyprogesterone acetate. Formal drug interaction studies have not been conducted; however, medroxyprogesterone is metabolized primarily by hydroxylation via the CYP3A4 in vitro. It is not known if fosamprenavir alters the metabolism of other hormonal contraceptives or other estrogen or progestin products. Because hormonal contraceptives do not protect against the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, women who receive hormonal contraceptives concurrently with protease inhibitors should use an additional barrier method of contraception such as condoms. In women receiving oral contraceptives containing drospirenone, consider monitoring serum potassium concentrations during the first month of dosing in high-risk patients who take strong CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as atazanavir, long-term and concomitantly. Drospirenone has antimineralocorticoid effects; the progestin may increase serum potassium.
    Gemifloxacin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used with antibiotics. Oral contraceptives (estrogen/progesterone) reduced the AUC and Cmax of gemifloxacin by 19% and 12%, respectively. These reductions are considered to be clinically insignificant. Gemifloxacin did not affect the pharmacokinetics of an ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel oral contraceptive product in healthy females. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Gentamicin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Glimepiride: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Glimepiride; Pioglitazone: (Major) Coadministration of pioglitazone with oral contraceptives can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormonal contraceptives. Higher-dosage oral contraceptive formulations may be needed to increase contraceptive efficacy during pioglitazone use or the use of an alternative or additional method of contraception can be considered. In addition, estrogens, progestins, and oral contraceptives may alter glucose tolerance, necessitating monitoring of blood glucose on hormone initiation. (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Glimepiride; Rosiglitazone: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Glipizide: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Glipizide; Metformin: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents like metformin should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Glyburide: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Glyburide; Metformin: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents like metformin should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Glycylcyclines: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Griseofulvin: (Major) The concurrent use of griseofulvin and oral contraceptives can reduce contraceptive efficacy and result in an unintended pregnancy and/or breakthrough bleeding. This risk is particularly serious because griseofulvin is contraindicated during pregnancy due to the risk of teratogenic and abortifacient effects. An alternate or additional form of contraception should be used during concomitant treatment and continued for 1 month after griseofulvin discontinuation. If these drugs are used together, counsel the patient about the risk of pregnancy and teratogenic effects, and instruct the patient to notify the prescriber if they experience breakthrough bleeding while receiving these drugs together. Additionally, patients taking non-oral combination contraceptives or progestins for hormone replacement therapy may also experience reduced clinical efficacy.
    Guarana: (Minor) Use guarana cautiously in female patients who use oral contraceptives as serum concentrations of caffeine may be increased during concurrent administration with ethinyl estradiol or combined hormonal oral contraceptives. This interaction occurs from the inhibition of methylxanthine oxidation in the liver. Patients should be informed of increased side effects associated with the caffeine component of guarana, such as nausea or tremors.
    Hydantoins: (Major) Drugs that can induce hepatic enzymes can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormonal contraceptives. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with progestin contraceptives in patients receiving hydantoins. Women taking both hormones and hepatic enzyme-inducing drugs should report breakthrough bleeding to their prescribers. An alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed concomitant therapy with enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants, or higher-dose hormonal regimens may be indicated where acceptable or applicable. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for one month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; if oral contraceptive failure occurs, the additive effects could potentially heighten the risk of neural tube defects in pregnancy.
    Idelalisib: (Moderate) Idelalisib is a strong CYP3A inhibitor, and ethinyl estradiol (EE) is a CYP3A substrate. Use caution in dose selection, as the hormonal side effects of ethinyl estradiol may be increased. The AUC of a sensitive CYP3A substrate was increased 5.4-fold when coadministered with idelalisib. Females of reproductive potential should avoid becoming pregnant during idelalisib therapy, using effective contraception during treatment and for at least 1 month after the last dose. Thus, use idelalisib with caution in combination with any combination oral contraceptives, most of which contain EE or mestranol (which is converted to EE). In addiiton, drospirenone has antimineralocorticoid effects; the progestin may increase serum potassium. Consider monitoring serum potassium concentrations during the first month of dosing in high-risk patients who take strong CYP3A4 inhibitors long-term and concomitantly.
    Imipenem; Cilastatin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Incretin Mimetics: (Moderate) Incretin mimetics slow gastric emptying and should be used with caution in patients receiving oral medications that require minimum threshold concentrations for efficacy, such as progestin-only oral contraceptives. Some incretin mimetics make specific recommendations to reduce the risk for interaction. Taking an oral contraceptive (OC) at least 1 hour before an incretin mimetic injection should reduce the risk of an effect on contraceptive or hormonal absorption. For Lixisenatide, the manufacturer recommends taking the OC 1 hour before injection or 11 hours after injection to reduce the effect on absorption. Additionally, progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Monitor blood glucose more carefully during initiation or discontinuation of hormone replacement or hormonal contraceptive treatment. Patients receiving incretin mimetics should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Indinavir: (Moderate) Many anti-retroviral protease inhibitors may interact with hormonal agents like norethindrone, due to their actions on CYP metabolism, particularly CYP3A4. Data on the effects that protease inhibitors have on the serum concentrations of norethindrone are complex and are based mostly off of data with norethindrone-containing contraceptives. The AUC for norethindrone increased by 26+/-14%, respectively, when a combined oral contraceptive was coadministered with indinavir. Women receiving hormonal contraceptives and anti-retroviral protease inhibitors (PIs), such as indinavir, should be instructed to report any breakthrough bleeding or other adverse effects to their prescribers. Because hormonal contraceptives do not protect against the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, women who receive hormonal contraceptives with indinavir should use an additional barrier method of contraception such as condoms.
    Insulins: (Minor) Progestins can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    Isoniazid, INH; Pyrazinamide, PZA; Rifampin: (Major) Drugs that can induce hepatic enzymes can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormonal contraceptives, including progestins. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with progestin contraceptives in patients receiving rifampin concurrently. other rifamycins (e.g., rifabutin and rifapentine), may also induce hepatic enzymes. Since the dosage of norethindrone for contraception cannot be modified, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients requiring therapy with rifamycins. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for one month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Patients taking norethindrone for other indications may need to be monitored for reductions in clinical effect of the progestin.
    Isoniazid, INH; Rifampin: (Major) Drugs that can induce hepatic enzymes can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormonal contraceptives, including progestins. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with progestin contraceptives in patients receiving rifampin concurrently. other rifamycins (e.g., rifabutin and rifapentine), may also induce hepatic enzymes. Since the dosage of norethindrone for contraception cannot be modified, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients requiring therapy with rifamycins. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for one month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Patients taking norethindrone for other indications may need to be monitored for reductions in clinical effect of the progestin.
    Isotretinoin: (Major) Although other hormonal contraceptives are highly effective during isotretinoin therapy, there have been reports of pregnancy in women who have used combination oral contraceptives or injectable/implantable contraceptive products. Therefore, it is critically important for women of childbearing potential to select and commit to use 2 forms of contraception simultaneously, at least 1 of which must be a primary form, unless absolute abstinence is the chosen method or the patient has undergone a hysterectomy.
    Kanamycin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Lamotrigine: (Major) Adult and adolescent women receiving combination oral contraceptives with lamotrigine may require close clinical monitoring and lamotrigine dosage adjustments as there is potential for decreased efficacy of both lamotrigine and the oral contraceptive. Estrogen-containing hormonal contraceptives may increase lamotrigine clearance during coadministration; in addition, side effects from lamotrigine such as dizziness, ataxia, and diplopia may occur during the placebo/off week, when lamotrigine clearance decreases. It is unknown if an interaction exists with non-oral combination contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy; however, it is possible that similar interactions could occur. Progestin-only products are not thought to change lamotrigine plasma levels. The specific dosage adjustment recommendations vary according to the type of hormonal contraception used and the presence or absence of other enzyme-inducing drug therapy. In one study, an oral contraceptive containing ethinyl estradiol; levonorgestrel 30 mcg/150 mcg administered for approximately 4.6 cycles (21 days of ethinyl estradiol (EE); levonorgestrel followed by 7 days of placebo) increased the clearance of lamotrigine 2-fold with mean decreases in AUC and Cmax of 52% and 39%, respectively. Trough lamotrigine concentrations increased an average of 2-fold by the end of the placebo week. Administration of lamotrigine 300 mg/day did not affect the kinetics of the EE component in a small group of female subjects. However, the AUC and Cmax of levonorgestrel decreased by 19% and 12%, respectively. The clinical outcome of these changes has not been studied. It is possible that EE; levonorgestrel efficacy could be reduced. Although not specifically recommended by the manufacturer, consideration should be given to prescribing progestin-only contraceptives or extended cycle combined hormonal contraceptives (e.g., Seasonale, Seasonique) to minimize lamotrigine serum concentration fluctuations). No adjustments to the initial lamotrigine dosing titration schedule are needed in women starting estrogen-containing contraceptives other than those recommended for initiation of lamotrigine in patients receiving other selected AEDs. The maintenance dose of lamotrigine following the initial titration or in those already stable on the drug will likely need to be increased 2-fold more than the usual recommended target dose to maintain consistent plasma levels in those not receiving enzyme-inducing medications (e.g., carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital, primidone, rifampin or other drugs, like rifampin, that increase lamotrigine glucuronidation, like ritonavir). Dose increases should begin when the oral contraceptive is started, and continue based upon response, not to exceed 50 to 100 mg/day per week unless lamotrigine plasma levels or response warrant otherwise. Gradual transient increases in lamotrigine plasma levels may occur during the placebo week, and may be larger if dose changes are made just prior to this phase in the hormone cycle, possibly resulting in lamotrigine toxicity. Therefore dose changes limited to the pill-free week are not recommended; if adverse effects continue to occur during the pill-free week, the overall maintenance dose may need adjustment. No dose adjustments should be needed in those stable on lamotrigine while starting or stopping estrogen-containing contraceptives and receiving enzyme-inducing medications. The lamotrigine maintenance dose will likely need to be decreased as much as 50% to maintain a consistent lamotrigine plasma level in those stopping estrogen-containing contraceptives and not receiving enzyme-inducing medications. Dosage decreases should not exceed 25% of the total daily dose per week over 2 weeks, unless lamotrigine plasma levels or response warrant otherwise. Until further data becomes available, close monitoring of lamotrigine for efficacy and toxicity is warranted in all situations.
    Lesinurad: (Major) Hormonal contraceptives, including combination oral contraceptives, non-oral combination contraceptives, and contraceptives containing only progestins. This includes injectable, transdermal, and implantable forms. Hormonal contraceptives may not be reliable when coadministered with lesinurad. Females should use additional, non-hormonal methods of contraception and not rely solely on hormonal contraceptive methods when taking lesinurad.
    Lesinurad; Allopurinol: (Major) Hormonal contraceptives, including combination oral contraceptives, non-oral combination contraceptives, and contraceptives containing only progestins. This includes injectable, transdermal, and implantable forms. Hormonal contraceptives may not be reliable when coadministered with lesinurad. Females should use additional, non-hormonal methods of contraception and not rely solely on hormonal contraceptive methods when taking lesinurad.
    Levofloxacin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Linagliptin: (Minor) Estrogens, progestins, or oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents, such as linagliptin, should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    Linagliptin; Metformin: (Minor) Estrogens, progestins, or oral contraceptives can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving > 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol per day. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of this effect. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents, such as linagliptin, should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents like metformin should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. Progestins can impair glucose tolerance.
    Lincomycin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Lincosamides: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Linezolid: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Lomitapide: (Major) Concomitant use of lomitapide and oral contraceptives may significantly increase the serum concentration of lomitapide. Therefore, the lomitapide dose should not exceed 30 mg/day PO during concurrent use. Oral Contraceptives are weak CYP3A4 inhibitors; the exposure to lomitapide is increased by approximately 2-fold in the presence of weak CYP3A4 inhibitors. In addition, females of reproductive potential must use effective contraception during lomitapide therapy. Because vomiting and diarrhea have been frequently reported during lomitapide therapy and hormone absorption from oral contraceptives may be incomplete in the presence of vomiting or diarrhea, warn patients that the use of additional contraceptive methods is warranted if vomiting or diarrhea occur.
    Lopinavir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) Many anti-retroviral protease inhibitors may interact with hormonal agents like norethindrone, due to their actions on CYP metabolism, particularly CYP3A4. Data on the effects that protease inhibitors have on the serum concentrations of norethindrone are complex and are based mostly off of data with norethindrone-containing contraceptives. For example, ritonavir (also found in combinations like lopinavir; ritonavir, and used as a booster in many HIV treatment regimens) may decrease the metabolism of norethindrone, raising norethindrone concentrations. Women receiving norethindrone for hormone replacement or contraception should report potential hormonal adverse effects (e.g., bleeding pattern changes, acne, emotional lability) or any changes in efficacy (e.g., noted changes in bleeding patterns) to their prescribers. Because norethindrone-containing contraceptives do not protect against the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, women who receive norethindrone contraception concurrently with ritonavir should use an additional barrier method of contraception such as condoms.
    Lumacaftor; Ivacaftor: (Major) Avoid concomitant use of hormonal contraceptives and lumacaftor; ivacaftor, unless the benefits outweigh the risks. Lumacaftor; ivacaftor may decrease hormonal contraceptive exposure, reducing efficacy. When coadministered with lumacaftor; ivacaftor, hormonal contraceptives are not a reliable method of effective contraception; instruct patients on alternative methods of birth control. In addition, concomitant use may increase the incidence of menstruation-associated adverse reactions (e.g., amenorrhea, dysmenorrhea, menorrhagia).
    Meglitinides: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Mephobarbital: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Meropenem: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Meropenem; Vaborbactam: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Metformin: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents like metformin should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. Progestins can impair glucose tolerance.
    Metformin; Pioglitazone: (Major) Coadministration of pioglitazone with oral contraceptives can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormonal contraceptives. Higher-dosage oral contraceptive formulations may be needed to increase contraceptive efficacy during pioglitazone use or the use of an alternative or additional method of contraception can be considered. In addition, estrogens, progestins, and oral contraceptives may alter glucose tolerance, necessitating monitoring of blood glucose on hormone initiation. (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents like metformin should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. Progestins can impair glucose tolerance.
    Metformin; Repaglinide: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents like metformin should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. Progestins can impair glucose tolerance.
    Metformin; Rosiglitazone: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents like metformin should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Metformin; Saxagliptin: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents like metformin should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. (Minor) Progestins can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    Metformin; Sitagliptin: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents like metformin should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued. Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. (Minor) Progestins can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    Methohexital: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Metronidazole: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Mifepristone, RU-486: (Severe) Mifepristone,RU-486 is a progesterone-receptor antagonist and will interfere with the effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives. Therefore, non-hormonal contraceptive methods should be used in Cushing's patients taking mifepristone.
    Miltefosine: (Moderate) Miltefosine induced vomiting and/or diarrhea may affect absorption of oral contraceptives; therefore, females who experience such reactions should be instructed to use additional/alternative non-hormonal methods of contraception.
    Minocycline: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Modafinil: (Major) Modafinil may cause failure of oral contraceptives or hormonal contraceptive-containing implants or devices due to induction of CYP3A4 isoenzyme metabolism of the progestins in these products. An alternative method or an additional method of contraception should be utilized during modafinil therapy and continued for one month after modafinil discontinuation. If these drugs are used together, monitor patients for a decrease in clinical effects; patients should report breakthrough bleeding to their prescriber. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Morphine: (Moderate) Combination oral contraceptives have been shown to decrease plasma concentrations of morphine, due to induction of conjugation. Monitor for decreased efficacy of morphine.
    Morphine; Naltrexone: (Moderate) Combination oral contraceptives have been shown to decrease plasma concentrations of morphine, due to induction of conjugation. Monitor for decreased efficacy of morphine.
    Moxifloxacin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Nafcillin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Nelfinavir: (Major) Many anti-retroviral protease inhibitors may interact with hormonal agents like norethindrone, due to their actions on CYP metabolism, particularly CYP3A4. Data on the effects that protease inhibitors have on the serum concentrations of norethindrone are complex and are based mostly off of data with norethindrone-containing contraceptives. Nelfinavir increases the metabolism of hormonal contraception; coadministration with a combined oral contraceptive containing norethindrone results in an 18% decrease in norethindrone plasma concentrations. Women receiving hormonal contraceptives or hormone replacement with norethindrone while receiving nelfinavir should be instructed to report any breakthrough bleeding or other adverse effects to their prescribers. It may be prudent for women who receive norethindrone-containing contraceptives concurrently with nelfinavir to use an additional method of contraception to protect against unwanted pregnancy. Additionally, because hormonal contraceptives do not protect against the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, women who receive hormonal contraceptives concurrently with PIs should use an additional barrier method of contraception such as condoms.
    Neomycin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Nevirapine: (Moderate) Nevirapine may decrease plasma concentrations of oral contraceptives and non-oral combination contraceptives (i.e., ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone). However despite lower exposures, literature suggests that use of nevirapine has no effect on pregnancy rates among HIV-infected women on combined oral contraceptives. Thus, the manufacturer states that no dose adjustments are needed when these drugs are used for contraception in combination with nevirapine. When these oral contraceptives are used for hormone replacement and given with nevirapine, the therapeutic effect of the hormonal therapy should be monitored.
    Nintedanib: (Moderate) In vitro, ethinyl estradiol (EE) is a mild inhibitor of CYP3A4; nintedanib is a minor CYP3A4 substrate. Coadministration may increase the concentration and clinical effect of nintedanib. If concomitant use of oral contraceptives containing EE, including mestranol, and the ethinyl estradiol; etonogestrel vaginal ring, and nintedanib is necessary, closely monitor for increased nintedanib side effects including gastrointestinal toxicity, elevated liver enzymes, and hypertension. A dose reduction of nintedanib, interruption of therapy, or discontinuation of therapy may be necessary in rare cases. Mestranol rapidly metabolized by demethylation to ethinyl estradiol upon absorption.
    Nitrofurantoin: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Norfloxacin: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ofloxacin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ombitasvir; Paritaprevir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) Many anti-retroviral protease inhibitors may interact with hormonal agents like norethindrone, due to their actions on CYP metabolism, particularly CYP3A4. Data on the effects that protease inhibitors have on the serum concentrations of norethindrone are complex and are based mostly off of data with norethindrone-containing contraceptives. For example, ritonavir (also found in combinations like lopinavir; ritonavir, and used as a booster in many HIV treatment regimens) may decrease the metabolism of norethindrone, raising norethindrone concentrations. Women receiving norethindrone for hormone replacement or contraception should report potential hormonal adverse effects (e.g., bleeding pattern changes, acne, emotional lability) or any changes in efficacy (e.g., noted changes in bleeding patterns) to their prescribers. Because norethindrone-containing contraceptives do not protect against the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, women who receive norethindrone contraception concurrently with ritonavir should use an additional barrier method of contraception such as condoms.
    Oritavancin: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Oxacillin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Oxcarbazepine: (Major) Progestins are susceptible to drug interactions with hepatic enzyme inducing drugs such as oxcarbazepine. Concurrent administration of oxcarbazepine progestins may increase the hormone's elimination. A high percentage of breakthrough bleeding has been reported in the literature from the combined use of oxcarbazepine and oral contraceptives; the results of one study demonstrated that the mean AUC of ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel was decreased by 52% when coadministered with oxcarbazepine. Women taking both hormones and hepatic enzyme-inducing drugs should report breakthrough bleeding to their prescribers. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs, or higher-dose hormonal regimens may be indicated where acceptable or applicable as pregnancy has been reported in patients taking the hepatic enzyme inducing drug phenytoin concurrently with hormonal contraceptives. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; if oral contraceptive failure occurs, the additive effects could potentially heighten the risk of neural tube defects in pregnancy. Patients taking these hormones for other indications may need to be monitored for reduced clinical effect while on oxcarbazepine, with dose adjustments made based on clinical efficacy.
    Paromomycin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Penicillin G Benzathine: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Penicillin G Benzathine; Penicillin G Procaine: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Penicillin G Procaine: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Penicillin G: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Penicillin V: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Pentobarbital: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Phenobarbital: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Phentermine; Topiramate: (Major) Topiramate may increase the clearance and compromise the efficacy of progestins used in contraception or hormone replacement therapies. In a pharmacokinetic interaction study, a combination oral contraceptive (containing norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol) administered with only topiramate at doses of 50 to 200 mg/day did not result in clinically significant alterations of AUC for either component of the oral contraceptive. Norethindrone pharmacokinetics were not significantly affected. However, pregnancy has been reported in patients who are using hormonal-containing contraceptives and taking hepatic enzyme inducers like topiramate. Patients taking progestin-containing contraceptives or patients taking progestins for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) should report changes in their bleeding patterns to their prescribers. Reduced contraceptive efficacy can occur even in the absence of breakthrough bleeding. Dosages of hormone replacement products may need adjustment. Different or additional forms of contraception may also be needed.
    Pioglitazone: (Major) Coadministration of pioglitazone with oral contraceptives can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormonal contraceptives. Higher-dosage oral contraceptive formulations may be needed to increase contraceptive efficacy during pioglitazone use or the use of an alternative or additional method of contraception can be considered. In addition, estrogens, progestins, and oral contraceptives may alter glucose tolerance, necessitating monitoring of blood glucose on hormone initiation.
    Piperacillin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Piperacillin; Tazobactam: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Polymyxin B: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Polymyxins: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Pramlintide: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Prasterone, Dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA (Dietary Supplements): (Moderate) Either additive or antagonistic effects could potentially occur if prasterone is combined with progestins.
    Prasterone, Dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA (FDA-approved): (Moderate) Either additive or antagonistic effects could potentially occur if prasterone is combined with progestins.
    Primidone: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Pyrimethamine; Sulfadoxine: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Rifabutin: (Major) Drugs that can induce hepatic enzymes can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormonal contraceptives, including progestins. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with progestin contraceptives in patients receiving rifampin concurrently. other rifamycins (e.g., rifabutin and rifapentine), may also induce hepatic enzymes. Since the dosage of norethindrone for contraception cannot be modified, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients requiring therapy with rifamycins. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for one month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Patients taking norethindrone for other indications may need to be monitored for reductions in clinical effect of the progestin.
    Rifampin: (Major) Drugs that can induce hepatic enzymes can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormonal contraceptives, including progestins. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with progestin contraceptives in patients receiving rifampin concurrently. other rifamycins (e.g., rifabutin and rifapentine), may also induce hepatic enzymes. Since the dosage of norethindrone for contraception cannot be modified, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients requiring therapy with rifamycins. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for one month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Patients taking norethindrone for other indications may need to be monitored for reductions in clinical effect of the progestin.
    Rifamycins: (Major) Drugs that can induce hepatic enzymes can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormonal contraceptives, including progestins. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with progestin contraceptives in patients receiving rifampin concurrently. other rifamycins (e.g., rifabutin and rifapentine), may also induce hepatic enzymes. Since the dosage of norethindrone for contraception cannot be modified, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients requiring therapy with rifamycins. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for one month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Patients taking norethindrone for other indications may need to be monitored for reductions in clinical effect of the progestin.
    Rifapentine: (Major) Drugs that can induce hepatic enzymes can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormonal contraceptives, including progestins. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with progestin contraceptives in patients receiving rifampin concurrently. other rifamycins (e.g., rifabutin and rifapentine), may also induce hepatic enzymes. Since the dosage of norethindrone for contraception cannot be modified, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients requiring therapy with rifamycins. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for one month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Patients taking norethindrone for other indications may need to be monitored for reductions in clinical effect of the progestin.
    Rifaximin: (Minor) Studies have shown rifaximin to be largely unabsorbed following oral administration with most of the drug recovered in feces. A study using rifaximin 200 mg PO tid for 3 days showed no alteration of presystemic metabolism of oral contraceptives containing 0.07 mg ethinyl estradiol and 0.50 mg norgestimate. No studies have been conducted with oral contraceptives and the 550 mg rifaximin dose used in hepatic encephalopathy.
    Ritonavir: (Moderate) Many anti-retroviral protease inhibitors may interact with hormonal agents like norethindrone, due to their actions on CYP metabolism, particularly CYP3A4. Data on the effects that protease inhibitors have on the serum concentrations of norethindrone are complex and are based mostly off of data with norethindrone-containing contraceptives. For example, ritonavir (also found in combinations like lopinavir; ritonavir, and used as a booster in many HIV treatment regimens) may decrease the metabolism of norethindrone, raising norethindrone concentrations. Women receiving norethindrone for hormone replacement or contraception should report potential hormonal adverse effects (e.g., bleeding pattern changes, acne, emotional lability) or any changes in efficacy (e.g., noted changes in bleeding patterns) to their prescribers. Because norethindrone-containing contraceptives do not protect against the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, women who receive norethindrone contraception concurrently with ritonavir should use an additional barrier method of contraception such as condoms.
    Roflumilast: (Moderate) Coadminister oral contraceptives containing gestodene and ethinyl estradiol and roflumilast cautiously, as the combination has resulted in increased drug exposure to roflumilast in pharmacokinetic study. In an open-label crossover study in 20 healthy adult volunteers, coadministration of a single dose of oral roflumilast 500 mcg with repeated doses of a fixed combination oral contraceptive containing 0.075 mg gestodene and 0.03 mg ethinyl estradiol to steady state resulted in a 38% increase in Cmax of roflumilast and a 12% decrease in Cmax of the active metabolite roflumilast N-oxide. Roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide AUCs were increased by 51% and 14%, respectively. A similar interaction is expected with oral contraceptives and ethinyl estradiol; etonogestrel.
    Rosiglitazone: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Rufinamide: (Major) Coadministration of hormonal contraceptives with rufinamide may reduce hormone concentrations and therefore reduce the clinical efficacy of hormonal contraceptives. If coadministration is necessary, recommend patients use additional non-hormonal forms of contraception. Hormonal contraceptives are metabolized by CYP3A4 and rufinamide is a weak CYP3A4 inducer.
    Sarilumab: (Moderate) Exercise caution when coadministering sarilumab with CYP3A4 substrate drugs where decrease in effectiveness is undesirable, such as with combined hormonal oral contraceptives. The effect of sarilumab on CYP450 enzyme activity may persist for several weeks after stopping therapy In vitro, sarilumab has the potential to affect expression of multiple CYP enzymes, including CYP3A4. A 45% decrease in exposure of a CYP3A4 substrate was noted 1 week after a single sarilumab dose.
    Saxagliptin: (Minor) Progestins can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    Secobarbital: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Siltuximab: (Moderate) Caution is warranted in patients with co-administered CYP3A4 substrates, such as oral contraceptives, in which a decreased effect would be undesirable. Cytochrome P450s in the liver are down regulated by infection and inflammation stimuli, including cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6). Inhibition of IL-6 signaling by siltuximab may restore CYP450 activities to higher levels leading to increased metabolism of drugs that are CYP450 substrates as compared to metabolism prior to treatment. The effect of siltuximab on CYP450 enzyme activity can persist for several weeks after stopping therapy.
    Simvastatin; Sitagliptin: (Minor) Progestins can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    Sitagliptin: (Minor) Progestins can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in diabetic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued.
    St. John's Wort, Hypericum perforatum: (Major) It is possible that, as with other CYP3A4 inducers, St. John's Wort could reduce the therapeutic efficacy of progestin-only contraceptives. Women should report irregular menstrual bleeding or other hormone-related symptoms to their health care providers if they are taking St. John's Wort concurrently with their hormones. Avoidance of these combinations is recommended.
    Streptogramins: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available. Additionally, dalfopristin; quinupristin is a major inhibitor of cytochrome P450 3A4 and may decrease the elimination of drugs metabolized by this enzyme including ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone. In addition, drospirenone has antimineralocorticoid effects; the progestin may increase serum potassium. Consider monitoring serum potassium concentrations during the first month of dosing in high-risk patients who take strong CYP3A4 inhibitors long-term and concomitantly.
    Streptomycin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Sugammadex: (Major) If an oral contraceptive is taken the same day sugammadex is administered, the patient must use an additional, non-hormonal contraceptive method or back-up method of contraception for the next 7 days. Sugammadex may bind to progestogen, resulting in a decrease in progestogen exposure. The administration of a bolus dose of sugammadex results in actions that are essentially equivalent to missing one or more doses of contraceptives containing estrogen or progestogen, including combination oral contraceptives, non-oral combination contraceptives, or progestins.
    Sulfadiazine: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Sulfamethoxazole; Trimethoprim, SMX-TMP, Cotrimoxazole: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Sulfasalazine: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Sulfisoxazole: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Sulfonamides: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Sulfonylureas: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Tedizolid: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances.Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Telaprevir: (Major) Close clinical monitoring for contraception failure is advised when coadministering norethindrone with telaprevir. It is not known if telaprevir reduces the efffectiveness of progestin-only contraception.Two effective non-hormonal methods of contraception should be used during treatment with telaprevir.
    Telavancin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Telithromycin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available. The pharmacokinetics of ethinyl estradiol were not altered when low dose triphasic oral contraceptives containing ethinyl estradiol; levonorgestrel were administered to women of child-bearing potential also receiving telithromycin. Plasma concentrations of levonorgestrel were increased by telithromycin. Drospirenone has antimineralocorticoid effects; the progestin may increase serum potassium. Consider monitoring serum potassium concentrations during the first month of dosing in high-risk patients who take strong CYP3A4 inhibitors long-term and concomitantly. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors include telithromycin.
    Teriflunomide: (Moderate) Teriflunomide may increase the effects of oral contraceptives. Following consecutive teriflunomide doses, mean ethinyl estradiol Cmax and AUC increased 1.58- and 1.54-fold, respectively, during coadministration. Levonorgestrel Cmax increased 1.33-fold and AUC 1.41-fold during coadministration. Use caution when selecting the type and dose of oral contraceptives in patients taking teriflunomide.
    Tetracycline: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Tetracyclines: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Thalidomide: (Moderate) Thalidomide and hormone contraceptives should be used cautiously due an increased risk of thromboembolism. The pharmacokinetic parameters of norethindrone/estradiol were not affected when a single dose of norethindrone 1 mg/estradiol 75 micrograms was administered in 10 healthy women who were receiving thalidomide 200 mg/day (at steady state levels).
    Thiopental: (Major) Avoid coadministration. Barbiturates induce hepatic enzymes and can accelerate the rate of metabolism of hormones, including progestins. For patients on hormone replacement treatments (HRT) with progestins, monitor for altered clinical response, such as increased hot flashes, vaginal dryness, changes in withdrawal bleeding, or other signs of decreased hormonal efficacy. For women taking hormonal contraception for birth control, loss of efficacy may lead to breakthrough bleeding and an increased risk for pregnancy. Pregnancy has been reported during therapy with hormonal contraceptives in patients receiving barbiturates. If used for contraception, an alternate or additional form of contraception should be considered in patients prescribed hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. The alternative or additional contraceptive agent may need to be continued for 1 month after discontinuation of the interacting medication. Additionally, epileptic women taking both anticonvulsants and OCs may be at higher risk of folate deficiency secondary to additive effects on folate metabolism; these women should ensure adequate folate supplementation.
    Ticarcillin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ticarcillin; Clavulanic Acid: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Tigecycline: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Tinidazole: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Tipranavir: (Major) It is not known if tipranavir alters the metabolism of norethindrone-only contraception; tipranavir has been reported to reduce efficacy of other hormonal contraceptives. Data on the effects that protease inhibitors have on the serum concentrations of norethindrone are complex and are based mostly off of data with norethindrone-containing contraceptives. Women receiving norethindrone hormone replacement or contraceptives with tipranavir should be instructed to report any breakthrough bleeding or other adverse effects to their prescribers. Alternate methods of non-hormonal contraception are recommended in patients receiving tipranavir. Because hormonal contraceptives do not protect against the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, women who receive hormonal contraceptives concurrently with tipranavir should use an additional barrier method of contraception such as condoms.
    Tizanidine: (Major) If possible, avoid the concurrent use of tizanidine with oral contraceptives (OC), as concurrent use could lead to substantial increases in tizanidine blood concentrations. A retrospective analysis of population pharmacokinetic data indicates that the clearance of tizanidine may be 50% lower in women who take combined hormonal OCs concurrently with tizanidine. Combined OCs increased tizanidine AUC by 4-fold and the mean Cmax by 3-fold in a parallel-group study in healthy women. Increased hypotensive effects were also noted in women taking tizanidine and OCs. If concurrent use cannot be avoided, initiate tizanidine therapy with the 2 mg dose and increase in 2 to 4 mg increments daily based on patient response to therapy. Discontinue tizanidine if hypotension, bradycardia, or excessive drowsiness occur.
    Tobramycin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Tocilizumab: (Moderate) Exercise caution when coadministering tocilizumab with CYP3A4 substrate drugs where decrease in effectiveness is undesirable, such as with combined hormonal oral contraceptives. The effect of tocilizumab on CYP450 enzyme activity may persist for several weeks after stopping therapy In vitro, tocilizumab has the potential to affect expression of multiple CYP enzymes, including CYP3A4. A 57% decrease in exposure of a CYP3A4 substrate was noted 1 week after a single tocilizumab dose.
    Tolazamide: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Tolbutamide: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Topiramate: (Major) Topiramate may increase the clearance and compromise the efficacy of progestins used in contraception or hormone replacement therapies. In a pharmacokinetic interaction study, a combination oral contraceptive (containing norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol) administered with only topiramate at doses of 50 to 200 mg/day did not result in clinically significant alterations of AUC for either component of the oral contraceptive. Norethindrone pharmacokinetics were not significantly affected. However, pregnancy has been reported in patients who are using hormonal-containing contraceptives and taking hepatic enzyme inducers like topiramate. Patients taking progestin-containing contraceptives or patients taking progestins for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) should report changes in their bleeding patterns to their prescribers. Reduced contraceptive efficacy can occur even in the absence of breakthrough bleeding. Dosages of hormone replacement products may need adjustment. Different or additional forms of contraception may also be needed.
    Trimethoprim: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ulipristal: (Major) Avoid concurrent use of ulipristal and hormonal contraceptives. Hormonal contraceptives may be started or resumed no sooner than 5 days after ulipristal treatment. A barrier method of contraception should be used during the same menstrual cycle in which ulipristal was administered. Progestins and progestin-containing oral contraceptives may impair the ability of ulipristal to delay ovulation by competitively binding at the progesterone receptor. The concurrent use of emergency contraceptives containing levonorgestrel is not recommended, for similar reason.
    Vancomycin: (Moderate) It would be prudent to recommend alternative or additional contraception when oral contraceptives (OCs) are used in conjunction with antibiotics. It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of OCs containing estrogens due to stimulation of metabolism or a reduction in enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with OCs and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma concentrations of OCs. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillin derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Voriconazole: (Moderate) Ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone increases the Cmax and AUC of voriconazole and voriconazole increases the Cmax and AUC of both ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone.

    PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

    Pregnancy

    Caution should be exercised when using norethindrone acetate for hormone replacement or other hormonal treatment in lactating women. Progestin-only contraceptives, including norethindrone, are generally considered to be compatible with breast-feeding; available evidence suggests that progestin-only contraceptives pills (POPs) are preferable to other hormonal contraceptives during lactation. Very rarely, adverse effects in the infant have been reported, including jaundice. In general, no adverse effects on breast-feeding performance or on the health, growth, or development of the infant have occurred with norethindrone POPs. Only rarely have there been isolated reports of decreased lactation. Progestins pass into breast milk in low amounts, resulting in steroid levels in infant plasma of 1% to 6% of the levels of maternal plasma. Monitoring of infant weight gain and growth can occur as per usual practices during maternal POP use. Medroxyprogesterone depot contraceptive injection is considered another acceptable progestin-only contraceptive option during lactation.

    MECHANISM OF ACTION

    The primary contraceptive effect of progestins involves the suppression of the midcycle surge of luteinizing hormone (LH). The exact mechanism of action, however, is unknown. At the cellular level, progestins diffuse freely into target cells and bind to the progesterone receptor. Target cells include the female reproductive tract, the mammary gland, the hypothalamus, and the pituitary. Once bound to the receptor, progestins slow the frequency of release of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus and blunt the pre-ovulatory LH surge, thereby preventing follicular maturation and ovulation. Additional mechanisms may be involved. Other actions of norethindrone include alterations in the endometrium that can impair implantation and an increase in cervical mucus viscosity which inhibits sperm migration into the uterus. The administration of norethindrone to women with adequate estrogen production transforms the uterus from a proliferative to a secretory phase. Norethindrone has minimal estrogenic, androgenic, and anabolic activity. When there is perfect adherence to proper oral dosing, the first-year failure rate for progestin-only oral contraceptives is 0.5%. However, the typical failure rate is estimated to be closer to 5%, due to late or omitted pills.

    PHARMACOKINETICS

    Norethindrone is administered orally. Pharmacokinetic parameters for norethindrone are poorly understood. Norethindrone is moderately bound to plasma proteins. It is hepatically metabolized and eliminated in both the urine and the feces. The elimination half-life of norethindrone is about 10 hours.