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  • CLASSES

    Other Drugs for the Treatment of Tuberculosis

    DEA CLASS

    Rx

    DESCRIPTION

    Oral antituberculosis agent that may inhibit folic acid synthesis and/or inhibit synthesis of a cell wall component 
    Use second-line to treat tuberculosis infection; often used for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis
    Must be used as part of a multi-drug treatment regimen

    COMMON BRAND NAMES

    PASER

    HOW SUPPLIED

    Aminosalicylic Acid/PASER Oral Gran: 4g

    DOSAGE & INDICATIONS

    For the treatment of tuberculosis infection in combination with other agents as second line therapy.
    NOTE: Aminosalicylic acid is most commonly used in the treatment of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis or when isoniazid and rifampin therapy is not possible due to resistance and/or intolerance.
    NOTE: The American Thoracic Society (ATS), Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend short-course regimens (e.g., at least 6 months) for uncomplicated pulmonary tuberculosis and most cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in adults. According to the ATS, CDC, and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), short-course regimens are also suitable in children. The initial regimen for the treatment of tuberculosis should include four drugs unless the likelihood of INH or rifampin resistance is low (i.e., < 4%), in which case an initial regimen of INH, rifampin, and pyrazinamide may be considered. HIV positive patients should always receive induction therapy with four drugs by DOT. When drug susceptibility results are available, the regimen should be altered as appropriate. For multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), drug therapy choice should be based on specific resistance patterns. For pediatrics, the CDC recommends treatment for 18—24 months after culture conversion in patients with bacteriologic confirmation and for at least 12 months in patients who are culture-negative. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends at least 8 months of an intensive phase of treatment with a total treatment duration of 20 months in MDR-TB.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    The manufacturer recommends administering 4 g PO 3 times daily for the oral granules. The ATS, IDSA, CDC, and WHO recommend 8—12 g/day PO in 2—3 doses. With weight-based dosing, the WHO suggests daily doses of 150 mg/kg PO in patients < 33 kg; 8 g PO in patients 33 kg to < 70 kg; and 8—12 g PO in patients > 70 kg. Tablets (500 mg) are still available in some countries, but not in the United States.

    Adolescents

    The manufacturer of the oral granules does not give a specific dose for the use in pediatric patients. The ATS, IDSA, CDC, AAP, and WHO recommend 200—300 mg/kg/day (maximum 10 g) PO in 2—4 doses. However, in patients > 40 kg, the adult dose of 8—12 g/day PO in 2—3 doses should be applied. Tablets (500 mg) are still available in some countries, but not in the United States.

    Infants and Children

    The manufacturer of the oral granules does not give a specific dose for the use in pediatric patients. The ATS, IDSA, CDC, AAP, and WHO recommend 200—300 mg/kg/day (maximum 10 g) PO in 2—4 doses. Tablets (500 mg) are still available in some countries, but not in the United States.

    For aminosalicylic acid desensitization.
    Oral dosage
    Adults, Adolescents, and Children

    Start with 10 mg as a single dose. Double dose every 2 days until reaching a total of 1 gram, then divide the dose to maintain the regular specified dosage regimen. Desensitization with this method has been successful in 15 of 17 patients. If there is mild temperature increase or a skin reaction develops, drop the increment back one level or hold the cycle progression for one cycle. Reactions are rare after a total dosage of 1.5 grams.

    MAXIMUM DOSAGE

    Adults

    12 g/day PO.

    Geriatric

    12 g/day PO.

    Adolescents

    12 g/day PO.

    Children

    12 g/day PO.

    Infants

    Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    Neonates

    Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

    Hepatic Impairment

    The manufacturer states that patients with hepatic disease may not tolerate aminosalicylic acid as well as those without hepatic disease; however, the metabolism between the two groups should be similar. No dosage adjustments are necessary.

    Renal Impairment

    Aminosalicylic acid is excreted by glomerular filtration. In patients with renal dysfunction, the half-life of the parent product does not vary significantly from healthy volunteers; however, the half-life of the metabolite is increased. The manufacturer does not give any dosing adjustment recommendations for patients with renal dysfunction; however, the manufacturer states that patients with end stage renal disease should not receive aminosalicylic acid. The American Thoracic Society (ATS), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the World Health Organization (WHO) recommend decreasing the dose in adults to 4 g PO bid for patients with a CrCl < 30 mL/min or for patients receiving hemodialysis.
     
    Intermittent Hemodialysis
    The manufacturer states that patients with end stage renal disease should not receive aminosalicylic acid. The ATS, IDSA, CDC, and WHO recommend decreasing the dose in adults to 4 g PO bid for patients receiving hemodialysis.  

    ADMINISTRATION

    Oral Administration
    Other Oral Formulations

    Oral Granule Administration
    Administer granules by suspension in an acidic drink or food with a pH of less than 5 (i.e., apple sauce, yogurt, tomato juice, orange juice) without chewing.
    Do not administer in neutral foods as this will dissolve the acid-resistant coating of the granules.
    Patients who have neutralized gastric acid with antacids will not need to protect the acid-resistant coating with an acidic food as the neutralized gastric acid will not render the drug ineffective.

    STORAGE

    PASER:
    - Avoid excessive heat (above 104 degrees F)
    - Product may be stored at room temperature for short periods of time
    - Store below 59 degrees F in a refrigerator or freezer

    CONTRAINDICATIONS / PRECAUTIONS

    Renal disease, renal failure

    Patients with end stage renal disease or renal failure should not receive aminosalicylic acid. Patients with severe renal disease will accumulate aminosalicylic acid and its acetyl metabolite, but will continue to acetylate, thereby leading exclusively to the inactive acetylated form of the drug.
     

    Hepatitis, jaundice

    Drug-induced hepatitis may rarely occur in patient taking aminosalicylic acid. Symptoms usually occurred within 3 months of the start of therapy. Rash is often the most common event, then fever. Gastrointestinal disturbances including anorexia, nausea, or diarrhea occur much less frequently. Premonitory symptoms in the majority of patients preceded jaundice by a few days to several weeks (mean onset time 33 days, range 7 to 90 days). When drug-induced hepatitis was diagnosed, hepatomegaly was often present with lymphadenopathy, leucocytosis, and eosinophilia. If hepatitis is recognized in the premonitory phase, jaundice may not occur. Prompt recognition and discontinuation of aminosalicylic acid often resulted in patient recovery; however, some studies showed that failure to recognize the reaction resulted in a mortality of up to 21%. Patients should be carefully monitored during the first 3 months of therapy with treatment discontinued at the first signs of intolerance. Most combination therapy for active TB disease includes more than 1 agent that may contribute to hepatotoxicity. Any adverse event leading to hospitalization or death should be reported to local or state health departments as well as the FDA MedWatch program.

    Hepatic disease

    Patients with hepatic disease may not tolerate aminosalicylic acid as well as patients without hepatic disease even though the metabolism is comparable between these patient types.

    Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in patients receiving aminosalicylic acid. As a result of competition, vitamin B12 absorption may be reduced by 55%. Supplementation should be considered.

    Malabsorption syndrome

    Malabsorption syndrome can occur in patients receiving aminosalicylic acid, but it is usually not complete. Complete syndrome symptoms include steatorrhea, an abnormal small bowel pattern on x-ray, villus atrophy, depressed cholesterol, and reduced D-xylose and iron absorption. Triglyceride absorption is always normal.

    Pregnancy

    Aminosalicylic acid is designated as pregnancy category C. There has been potential occipital malformation in animal studies; however, since literature reports in humans have always reported coadministration with other medications, there have been no adequate studies in humans. The manufacturer recommends that aminosalicylic acid should only be given during pregnancy in the benefits to the mother outweighs the risk to the fetus.

    Breast-feeding

    Small amounts of aminosalicylic acid may be excreted in breast milk and the manufacturer recommends caution with use in breast-feeding women. After administration of a different preparation of aminosalicylic acid to one patient, the maximum concentration in the milk was 1 mcg/mL at 3 hours with a half-life of 2.5 hours; the maximum maternal plasma concentration was 70 mcg/mL at two hours. Aminosalicylic acid was used as part of multidrug regimens to treat two pregnant women with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, one throughout pregnancy and postpartum and the other postpartum only. The infants were breastfed (extent and duration not stated) and the children were developing normally except for a mild speech delay in one and hyperactivity in the other. Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential infant drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding infant experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally administered drug, healthcare providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Severe

    exfoliative dermatitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    pericarditis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    agranulocytosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hemolytic anemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    optic neuritis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    vasculitis / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Moderate

    leukopenia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypoglycemia / Early / Incidence not known
    encephalopathy / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hepatitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    thrombocytopenia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    jaundice / Delayed / Incidence not known
    crystalluria / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Mild

    vomiting / Early / Incidence not known
    nausea / Early / Incidence not known
    diarrhea / Early / Incidence not known
    abdominal pain / Early / Incidence not known
    fever / Early / Incidence not known

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Acetazolamide: (Major) Avoid the coadministration of high-dose salicylates and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors whenever possible. There were reports of anorexia, tachypnea, lethargy, metabolic acidosis, coma, and death with high-dose aspirin and acetazolamide. Two mechanisms could cause increased acetazolamide concentrations, resulting in CNS depression and metabolic acidosis: first, competition with aspirin for renal tubular secretion and, second, displacement by salicylates from plasma protein binding sites. Additionally, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors alkalinize urine and increase the excretion of normal doses of salicylates; decreased plasma salicylate concentrations may or may not be clinically significant.
    Aliskiren; Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Aliskiren; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Alogliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Alogliptin; Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Alogliptin; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Alpha-glucosidase Inhibitors: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Amiloride: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia.
    Amiloride; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Aminobenzoate Potassium: (Moderate) Aminobenzoate potassium should not be administered to patients taking sulfonamides or aminosalicylate sodium, aminosalicylic acid. Bacteria preferentially absorb aminobenzoate potassium instead of the antibacterial agents, decreasing their efficacy.
    Aminoglycosides: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like the aminoglycosides may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Amlodipine; Benazepril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Olmesartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Valsartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Amphotericin B cholesteryl sulfate complex (ABCD): (Minor) Concurrent use of amphotericin B and other potentially nephrotoxic medications, like the salicylates, may enhance the potential for drug-induced renal toxicity.
    Amphotericin B lipid complex (ABLC): (Minor) Concurrent use of amphotericin B and other potentially nephrotoxic medications, like the salicylates, may enhance the potential for drug-induced renal toxicity.
    Amphotericin B liposomal (LAmB): (Minor) Concurrent use of amphotericin B and other potentially nephrotoxic medications, like the salicylates, may enhance the potential for drug-induced renal toxicity.
    Amphotericin B: (Minor) Concurrent use of amphotericin B and other potentially nephrotoxic medications, like the salicylates, may enhance the potential for drug-induced renal toxicity.
    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Antithrombin III: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates (more than 3 to 4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding. Patients taking large doses of salicylates and antithrombin III should be monitored closely for bleeding.
    Antithymocyte Globulin: (Moderate) An increased risk of bleeding may occur when salicylates are used with agents that cause clinically significant thrombocytopenia due to decreases in platelet aggregation, such as anti-thymocyte immune globulin.
    Apixaban: (Major) Large doses of salicylates (>= 3-4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding. Patients taking large doses of salicylates and apixaban should be monitored closely for bleeding.
    Ardeparin: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving a low molecular weight heparin in combination with other agents known to increase the risk of bleeding such as salicylates. Monitor clinical and laboratory response closely during concurrent use.
    Atenolol; Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Azilsartan; Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Bacitracin: (Minor) Additive nephrotoxicity may occur with concurrent use of systemic bacitracin and other nephrotoxic agents, including salicylates. Topical administration of any preparation containing bacitracin, especially when applied to large surface areas, also should not be given with other drugs that have a nephrotoxic potential.
    Barbiturates: (Moderate) Due to high protein binding, salicylates could be displaced from binding sites, or could displace other highly protein-bound drugs such as barbiturates. An enhanced effect of the displaced drug may occur.
    Benazepril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Benazepril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Bendroflumethiazide; Nadolol: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Bisoprolol; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Bromocriptine: (Moderate) Bromocriptine is highly bound to serum proteins. Therefore, it may increase the unbound fraction of other highly protein-bound medications (e.g., salicylates), which may alter their effectiveness and risk for side effects.
    Bumetanide: (Moderate) Salicylates may decrease the diuretic, natriuretic, and antihypertensive actions of diuretics, possibly through inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. Patients receiving loop diuretics and salicylates should be monitored for changes in the effectiveness of their diuretic therapy.
    Calcium Carbonate: (Minor) By increasing urinary pH, calcium carbonate can increase the urinary excretion of salicylates.
    Calcium Carbonate; Magnesium Hydroxide: (Minor) By increasing urinary pH, calcium carbonate can increase the urinary excretion of salicylates.
    Calcium Carbonate; Risedronate: (Minor) By increasing urinary pH, calcium carbonate can increase the urinary excretion of salicylates.
    Calcium; Vitamin D: (Minor) By increasing urinary pH, calcium carbonate can increase the urinary excretion of salicylates.
    Canagliflozin: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Canagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Candesartan; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Capreomycin: (Major) Since capreomycin is eliminated by the kidney, coadministration with other potentially nephrotoxic drugs, including salicylates, may increase serum concentrations of either drug. Theoretically, the chronic coadministration of these drugs may increase the risk of developing nephrotoxicity, even in patients who have normal renal function. Monitor patients for changes in renal function if these drugs are coadministered.
    Captopril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Captopril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Cefixime: (Minor) In vitro, salicylates have displaced cefixime from its protein-binding sites, resulting in a 50% increase in free cefixime levels. The clinical significance of this effect is unclear at this time.
    Cefotetan: (Minor) Cefotetan has been associated with hypoprothrombinemia and may cause additive effects when given concurrently with salicylates.
    Celecoxib: (Major) Use celecoxib and salicylates in combination with caution. Analgesic doses of salicylates with celecoxib is not recommended due to additive gastrointestinal toxicity without additional analgesic benefit. Furthermore, cardioprotective doses of aspirin in combination with celecoxib are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal toxicity. In patients receiving low-dose aspirin with celecoxib over a 9-month period, GI bleeding, perforation, or obstruction was higher compared to patients taking celecoxib only (2.19% for combination vs. 0.78% for celecoxib only). Celecoxib does not exhibit antiplatelet effects and is not a substitute for aspirin when used for cardiovascular prophylaxis. However, there is no consistent evidence that concurrent use of aspirin with celecoxib mitigates the increased risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events associated with NSAID use.
    Chlorothiazide: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Chlorthalidone; Clonidine: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Citric Acid; Potassium Citrate: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents, like potassium citrate, increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Citric Acid; Potassium Citrate; Sodium Citrate: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents, like potassium citrate, increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Cobicistat; Elvitegravir; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate: (Major) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents, like salicylates should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Colistimethate, Colistin, Polymyxin E: (Major) Theoretically, the chronic coadministration of these drugs may increase the risk of developing nephrotoxicity, even in patients who have normal renal function. Monitor patients for changes in renal function if these drugs are coadministered. Since colistimethate sodium is eliminated by the kidney, coadministration with other potentially nephrotoxic drugs, including salicylates, may increase serum concentrations of either drug.
    Corticosteroids: (Moderate) Salicylates or NSAIDs should be used cautiously in patients receiving corticosteroids. While there is controversy regarding the ulcerogenic potential of corticosteroids alone, concomitant administration of corticosteroids with aspirin may increase the GI toxicity of aspirin and other non-acetylated salicylates. Withdrawal of corticosteroids can result in increased plasma concentrations of salicylate and possible toxicity. Concomitant use of corticosteroids may increase the risk of adverse GI events due to NSAIDs. Although some patients may need to be given corticosteroids and NSAIDs concomitantly, which can be done successfully for short periods of time without sequelae, prolonged coadministration should be avoided.
    Cyclosporine: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents like cyclosporine may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Dalteparin: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving a low molecular weight heparin in combination with other agents known to increase the risk of bleeding such as salicylates. Monitor clinical and laboratory response closely during concurrent use.
    Dapagliflozin: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Dapagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Dapagliflozin; Saxagliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, decreasing blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving saxagliptin. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Deferasirox: (Moderate) Because gastric ulceration and GI bleeding have been reported in patients taking deferasirox, use caution when coadministering with other drugs known to increase the risk of peptic ulcers or gastric hemorrhage including salicylates.
    Diclofenac: (Major) Increased adverse gastrointestinal effects, including gastric ulceration or blood loss, are possible if diclofenac is used with salicylates. The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function.
    Diclofenac; Misoprostol: (Major) Increased adverse gastrointestinal effects, including gastric ulceration or blood loss, are possible if diclofenac is used with salicylates. The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function.
    Diflunisal: (Major) The concurrent use of diflunisal and salicylates is not recommended due to the increased risk of gastrointestinal toxicity with little or no increase in anti-inflammatory efficacy.
    Diphenhydramine; Ibuprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity. The FDA issued an advisory that 400 mg of ibuprofen can interfere with the antiplatelet effects of low dose aspirin (81 mg per day). Routine use of ibuprofen is likely to have the most significant effect. The FDA recommends administering ibuprofen 8 hours before or 30 minutes after aspirin if concurrent therapy is needed. Interactions have been noted between ibuprofen and aspirin, ASA. Concurrent use of chronic ibuprofen therapy (800 mg three times daily) seems to antagonize the inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity and impairment of platelet aggregation by low-dose aspirin (81 mg once daily) per an ex vivo analysis. In this study, diclofenac or rofecoxib therapy, agents with less activity at COX-1 than ibuprofen, did not affect inhibition of platelet aggregation by aspirin. An in vitro study has shown that the antagonism of aspirin platelet inhibition probably involves competition at platelet-derived COX-1 and is related to the NSAIDs' ability to inhibit COX-1 mediated thromboxane B2 production in platelets. Clinically, the interaction may be more dramatic with regular as compared with intermittent ibuprofen usage. Quantification of the risk was determined by the analysis of retrospective data, which may be inaccurate and incomplete. However, a trend towards a greater risk of a second myocardial infarction in the year after the initial event among adults taking daily aspirin was associated with a greater length of ibuprofen exposure.
    Diphenhydramine; Naproxen: (Major) Aspirin, ASA displaces naproxen from binding to albumin and increases naproxen excretion. Due to an increased free fraction of naproxen, increased adverse gastrointestinal effects are possible if naproxen is used with aspirin. In addition, further benefit with use of the two drugs as compared with aspirin monotherapy is not apparent, and antagonism of the irreversible platelet effect of aspirin occurs with concurrent use. The interaction appears to be due to competition at the enzyme active site. Patients who take low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular health may have the beneficial effects of aspirin on platelet function counteracted by naproxen. Concomitant aspirin and naproxen use is not recommended. The use of Naproxen with other salicylates can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Drotrecogin Alfa: (Major) Treatment with drotrecogin alfa should be carefully considered in patients who are receiving or have received salicylates within 7 days. These patients are at increased risk of bleeding during drotrecogin alfa therapy. Caution should be used when drotrecogin alfa is used with any other drugs that affect hemostasis.
    Edoxaban: (Major) Large doses of salicylates (>= 3-4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding. Patients taking large doses of salicylates and edoxaban should be monitored closely for bleeding.
    Efavirenz; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir: (Major) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents, like salicylates should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Empagliflozin: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Empagliflozin; Linagliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents, such as linagliptin. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Empagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Emtricitabine; Rilpivirine; Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate: (Major) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents, like salicylates should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Emtricitabine; Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate: (Major) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents, like salicylates should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Enalapril, Enalaprilat: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Enalapril; Felodipine: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Enalapril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Enoxaparin: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving a low molecular weight heparin in combination with other agents known to increase the risk of bleeding such as salicylates. Monitor clinical and laboratory response closely during concurrent use.
    Eprosartan; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Esomeprazole; Naproxen: (Major) Aspirin, ASA displaces naproxen from binding to albumin and increases naproxen excretion. Due to an increased free fraction of naproxen, increased adverse gastrointestinal effects are possible if naproxen is used with aspirin. In addition, further benefit with use of the two drugs as compared with aspirin monotherapy is not apparent, and antagonism of the irreversible platelet effect of aspirin occurs with concurrent use. The interaction appears to be due to competition at the enzyme active site. Patients who take low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular health may have the beneficial effects of aspirin on platelet function counteracted by naproxen. Concomitant aspirin and naproxen use is not recommended. The use of Naproxen with other salicylates can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Ethacrynic Acid: (Moderate) Salicylates may decrease the diuretic, natriuretic, and antihypertensive actions of diuretics, possibly through inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. Patients receiving loop diuretics and salicylates should be monitored for changes in the effectiveness of their diuretic therapy.
    Ethambutol: (Moderate) Careful monitoring of hepatic function is recommended with the concurrent use of aminosalicylate sodium, aminosalicylic acid and ethambutol. Each drug has the potential to cause hepatotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity risk may be increased with concomitant use. These drugs may be used together for the treatment of active tuberculosis (TB) infection, and patients should also be assessed for additional risk factors for hepatotoxicity, such as other hepatotoxic drugs, alcohol use, and underlying hepatic disease. Any adverse event leading to hospitalization or death should be reported to local or state health departments as well as the FDA MedWatch program.
    Ethanol: (Major) Concomitant ingestion of ethanol with salicylates, especially aspirin, ASA, increases the risk of developing gastric irritation and GI mucosal bleeding. Ethanol and salicylates are mucosal irritants and aspirin decreases platelet aggregation. Routine ingestion of ethanol and aspirin can cause significant GI bleeding, which may or may not be overt. Even occasional concomitant use of salicylates and ethanol should be avoided. Chronic alcoholism is often associated with hypoprothrombinemia and this condition increases the risk of salicylate-induced bleeding. Patients should be warned regarding the potential for increased risk of GI bleeding if alcohol-containing beverages are taken concurrently with salicylates
    Ethionamide: (Moderate) Careful monitoring of hepatic function is recommended with the concurrent use of ethionamide and aminosalicylate sodium, aminosalicylic acid. Each drug has the potential to cause hepatotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity risk may be increased with concomitant use. These drugs may be used together for the treatment of active tuberculosis (TB) infection, and patients should also be assessed for additional risk factors for hepatotoxicity, such as other hepatotoxic drugs, alcohol use, and underlying hepatic disease. Any adverse event leading to hospitalization or death should be reported to local or state health departments as well as the FDA MedWatch program.
    Ethotoin: (Minor) Large doses of salicylates can displace hydantoins from plasma protein-binding sites. Although increased serum concentrations of unbound phenytoin may lead to phenytoin toxicity, the liver may also more rapidly clear unbound drug.
    Etodolac: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Famotidine; Ibuprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity. The FDA issued an advisory that 400 mg of ibuprofen can interfere with the antiplatelet effects of low dose aspirin (81 mg per day). Routine use of ibuprofen is likely to have the most significant effect. The FDA recommends administering ibuprofen 8 hours before or 30 minutes after aspirin if concurrent therapy is needed. Interactions have been noted between ibuprofen and aspirin, ASA. Concurrent use of chronic ibuprofen therapy (800 mg three times daily) seems to antagonize the inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity and impairment of platelet aggregation by low-dose aspirin (81 mg once daily) per an ex vivo analysis. In this study, diclofenac or rofecoxib therapy, agents with less activity at COX-1 than ibuprofen, did not affect inhibition of platelet aggregation by aspirin. An in vitro study has shown that the antagonism of aspirin platelet inhibition probably involves competition at platelet-derived COX-1 and is related to the NSAIDs' ability to inhibit COX-1 mediated thromboxane B2 production in platelets. Clinically, the interaction may be more dramatic with regular as compared with intermittent ibuprofen usage. Quantification of the risk was determined by the analysis of retrospective data, which may be inaccurate and incomplete. However, a trend towards a greater risk of a second myocardial infarction in the year after the initial event among adults taking daily aspirin was associated with a greater length of ibuprofen exposure.
    Fenoprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Flurbiprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Fondaparinux: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving platelet inhibitors (e.g. aspirin, ASA) in combination with fondaparinux. Data on the concomitant use of fondaparinux with aspirin are lacking; however, large doses of salicylates (>= 3-4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding.
    Foscarnet: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents, such as foscarnet, may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Fosinopril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Fosinopril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Fosphenytoin: (Minor) Large doses of salicylates can displace phenytoin from plasma protein-binding sites. Although increased serum concentrations of unbound phenytoin may lead to phenytoin toxicity, the liver may also more rapidly clear unbound drug. Fosphenytoin is converted to phenytoin in vivo, so this interaction may also occur with fosphenytoin.
    Furosemide: (Moderate) Salicylates may decrease the diuretic, natriuretic, and antihypertensive actions of diuretics, possibly through inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. Patients receiving loop diuretics and salicylates should be monitored for changes in the effectiveness of their diuretic therapy.
    Gallium Ga 68 Dotatate: (Minor) Mannitol promotes the urinary excretion of salicylates, barbiturates, imipramine, and bromides, and it may be used as an adjunct in patients with severe intoxication of these substances. In addition, salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics because salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance.
    Glimepiride; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Glimepiride; Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Glipizide; Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control.
    Glyburide; Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control.
    Griseofulvin: (Moderate) Concurrent administration of griseofulvin with salicylates may result in decreased salicylate serum concentrations. Caution and close monitoring for changes in the effectiveness of the salicylate are recommended.
    Heparin: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving platelet inhibitors (e.g. aspirin, ASA). Despite the potential drug-drug interaction between aspirin and heparin, heparin is frequently administered in combination with low-dose aspirin therapy to patients who have had an acute myocardial infarction and in other disease states. In addition, large doses of salicylates (>= 3-4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding.
    Hyaluronidase, Recombinant; Immune Globulin: (Minor) Salicylates, when given in large systemic doses, may render tissues partially resistant to the action of hyaluronidase. Patients receiving these medications may require larger amounts of hyaluronidase for equivalent dispersing effect.
    Hyaluronidase: (Minor) Salicylates, when given in large systemic doses, may render tissues partially resistant to the action of hyaluronidase. Patients receiving these medications may require larger amounts of hyaluronidase for equivalent dispersing effect.
    Hydralazine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Irbesartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Lisinopril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Losartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Methyldopa: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Metoprolol: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Moexipril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Olmesartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Propranolol: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Quinapril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Spironolactone: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Telmisartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Triamterene: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia. (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Valsartan: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Hydrocodone; Ibuprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity. The FDA issued an advisory that 400 mg of ibuprofen can interfere with the antiplatelet effects of low dose aspirin (81 mg per day). Routine use of ibuprofen is likely to have the most significant effect. The FDA recommends administering ibuprofen 8 hours before or 30 minutes after aspirin if concurrent therapy is needed. Interactions have been noted between ibuprofen and aspirin, ASA. Concurrent use of chronic ibuprofen therapy (800 mg three times daily) seems to antagonize the inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity and impairment of platelet aggregation by low-dose aspirin (81 mg once daily) per an ex vivo analysis. In this study, diclofenac or rofecoxib therapy, agents with less activity at COX-1 than ibuprofen, did not affect inhibition of platelet aggregation by aspirin. An in vitro study has shown that the antagonism of aspirin platelet inhibition probably involves competition at platelet-derived COX-1 and is related to the NSAIDs' ability to inhibit COX-1 mediated thromboxane B2 production in platelets. Clinically, the interaction may be more dramatic with regular as compared with intermittent ibuprofen usage. Quantification of the risk was determined by the analysis of retrospective data, which may be inaccurate and incomplete. However, a trend towards a greater risk of a second myocardial infarction in the year after the initial event among adults taking daily aspirin was associated with a greater length of ibuprofen exposure.
    Ibuprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity. The FDA issued an advisory that 400 mg of ibuprofen can interfere with the antiplatelet effects of low dose aspirin (81 mg per day). Routine use of ibuprofen is likely to have the most significant effect. The FDA recommends administering ibuprofen 8 hours before or 30 minutes after aspirin if concurrent therapy is needed. Interactions have been noted between ibuprofen and aspirin, ASA. Concurrent use of chronic ibuprofen therapy (800 mg three times daily) seems to antagonize the inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity and impairment of platelet aggregation by low-dose aspirin (81 mg once daily) per an ex vivo analysis. In this study, diclofenac or rofecoxib therapy, agents with less activity at COX-1 than ibuprofen, did not affect inhibition of platelet aggregation by aspirin. An in vitro study has shown that the antagonism of aspirin platelet inhibition probably involves competition at platelet-derived COX-1 and is related to the NSAIDs' ability to inhibit COX-1 mediated thromboxane B2 production in platelets. Clinically, the interaction may be more dramatic with regular as compared with intermittent ibuprofen usage. Quantification of the risk was determined by the analysis of retrospective data, which may be inaccurate and incomplete. However, a trend towards a greater risk of a second myocardial infarction in the year after the initial event among adults taking daily aspirin was associated with a greater length of ibuprofen exposure.
    Ibuprofen; Oxycodone: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity. The FDA issued an advisory that 400 mg of ibuprofen can interfere with the antiplatelet effects of low dose aspirin (81 mg per day). Routine use of ibuprofen is likely to have the most significant effect. The FDA recommends administering ibuprofen 8 hours before or 30 minutes after aspirin if concurrent therapy is needed. Interactions have been noted between ibuprofen and aspirin, ASA. Concurrent use of chronic ibuprofen therapy (800 mg three times daily) seems to antagonize the inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity and impairment of platelet aggregation by low-dose aspirin (81 mg once daily) per an ex vivo analysis. In this study, diclofenac or rofecoxib therapy, agents with less activity at COX-1 than ibuprofen, did not affect inhibition of platelet aggregation by aspirin. An in vitro study has shown that the antagonism of aspirin platelet inhibition probably involves competition at platelet-derived COX-1 and is related to the NSAIDs' ability to inhibit COX-1 mediated thromboxane B2 production in platelets. Clinically, the interaction may be more dramatic with regular as compared with intermittent ibuprofen usage. Quantification of the risk was determined by the analysis of retrospective data, which may be inaccurate and incomplete. However, a trend towards a greater risk of a second myocardial infarction in the year after the initial event among adults taking daily aspirin was associated with a greater length of ibuprofen exposure.
    Ibuprofen; Pseudoephedrine: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity. The FDA issued an advisory that 400 mg of ibuprofen can interfere with the antiplatelet effects of low dose aspirin (81 mg per day). Routine use of ibuprofen is likely to have the most significant effect. The FDA recommends administering ibuprofen 8 hours before or 30 minutes after aspirin if concurrent therapy is needed. Interactions have been noted between ibuprofen and aspirin, ASA. Concurrent use of chronic ibuprofen therapy (800 mg three times daily) seems to antagonize the inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity and impairment of platelet aggregation by low-dose aspirin (81 mg once daily) per an ex vivo analysis. In this study, diclofenac or rofecoxib therapy, agents with less activity at COX-1 than ibuprofen, did not affect inhibition of platelet aggregation by aspirin. An in vitro study has shown that the antagonism of aspirin platelet inhibition probably involves competition at platelet-derived COX-1 and is related to the NSAIDs' ability to inhibit COX-1 mediated thromboxane B2 production in platelets. Clinically, the interaction may be more dramatic with regular as compared with intermittent ibuprofen usage. Quantification of the risk was determined by the analysis of retrospective data, which may be inaccurate and incomplete. However, a trend towards a greater risk of a second myocardial infarction in the year after the initial event among adults taking daily aspirin was associated with a greater length of ibuprofen exposure.
    Incretin Mimetics: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents. Monitor blood glucose closely during coadministration.
    Indapamide: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics because salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance.
    Insulins: (Moderate) Use large doses of aspirin cautiously in patients receiving insulin. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia.
    Isoniazid, INH: (Moderate) Careful monitoring of hepatic function is recommended with the concurrent use of aminosalicylate sodium, aminosalicylic acid and isoniazid, INH. Each drug has the potential to cause hepatotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity risk may be increased with concomitant use. These drugs may be used together for the treatment of active tuberculosis (TB) infection, and patients should also be assessed for additional risk factors for hepatotoxicity, such as other hepatotoxic drugs, alcohol use, and underlying hepatic disease. When administered as a rapidly available formulation at a dose of 12 g, aminosalicylic acid has been reported to produce a 20% reduction in the acetylation of isoniazid, INH, especially in rapid acetylators. However, the INH serum concentrations, half-lives, and excretion in fast acetylators still remained half of those noted in slow acetylators, with or without aminosalicylic acid. The effect is dose related and has not been studied in the delayed-release preparation (i.e. delayed-release granules) of aminosalicylic acid. Lower serum concentrations observed with the delayed release aminosalicylic acid products should result in a reduced effect on the acetylation of INH. Any adverse event leading to hospitalization or death should be reported to local or state health departments as well as the FDA MedWatch program.
    Isoniazid, INH; Pyrazinamide, PZA; Rifampin: (Moderate) Careful monitoring of hepatic function is recommended with the concurrent use of aminosalicylate sodium, aminosalicylic acid and isoniazid, INH. Each drug has the potential to cause hepatotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity risk may be increased with concomitant use. These drugs may be used together for the treatment of active tuberculosis (TB) infection, and patients should also be assessed for additional risk factors for hepatotoxicity, such as other hepatotoxic drugs, alcohol use, and underlying hepatic disease. When administered as a rapidly available formulation at a dose of 12 g, aminosalicylic acid has been reported to produce a 20% reduction in the acetylation of isoniazid, INH, especially in rapid acetylators. However, the INH serum concentrations, half-lives, and excretion in fast acetylators still remained half of those noted in slow acetylators, with or without aminosalicylic acid. The effect is dose related and has not been studied in the delayed-release preparation (i.e. delayed-release granules) of aminosalicylic acid. Lower serum concentrations observed with the delayed release aminosalicylic acid products should result in a reduced effect on the acetylation of INH. Any adverse event leading to hospitalization or death should be reported to local or state health departments as well as the FDA MedWatch program. (Moderate) Careful monitoring of hepatic function is recommended with the concurrent use of pyrazinamide, PZA and aminosalicylate sodium, aminosalicylic acid. Each drug has the potential to cause hepatotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity risk may be increased with concomitant use. These drugs may be used together for the treatment of active tuberculosis (TB) infection, and patients should also be assessed for additional risk factors for hepatotoxicity, such as other hepatotoxic drugs, alcohol use, and underlying hepatic disease. Any adverse event leading to hospitalization or death should be reported to local or state health departments as well as the FDA MedWatch program. (Moderate) Careful monitoring of hepatic function is recommended with the concurrent use of rifampin and aminosalicylate sodium, aminosalicylic acid. Each drug has the potential to cause hepatotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity risk may be increased with concomitant use. These drugs may be used together for the treatment of active tuberculosis (TB) infection, and patients should also be assessed for additional risk factors for hepatotoxicity, such as other hepatotoxic drugs, alcohol use, and underlying hepatic disease. Aminosalicylic acid has previously been reported to block the absorption of rifampin; however, this was due to an excipient not included in the aminosalicylic acid granules. Oral administration of a solution of both agents showed full absorption of each product. Any adverse event leading to hospitalization or death should be reported to local or state health departments as well as the FDA MedWatch program.
    Isoniazid, INH; Rifampin: (Moderate) Careful monitoring of hepatic function is recommended with the concurrent use of aminosalicylate sodium, aminosalicylic acid and isoniazid, INH. Each drug has the potential to cause hepatotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity risk may be increased with concomitant use. These drugs may be used together for the treatment of active tuberculosis (TB) infection, and patients should also be assessed for additional risk factors for hepatotoxicity, such as other hepatotoxic drugs, alcohol use, and underlying hepatic disease. When administered as a rapidly available formulation at a dose of 12 g, aminosalicylic acid has been reported to produce a 20% reduction in the acetylation of isoniazid, INH, especially in rapid acetylators. However, the INH serum concentrations, half-lives, and excretion in fast acetylators still remained half of those noted in slow acetylators, with or without aminosalicylic acid. The effect is dose related and has not been studied in the delayed-release preparation (i.e. delayed-release granules) of aminosalicylic acid. Lower serum concentrations observed with the delayed release aminosalicylic acid products should result in a reduced effect on the acetylation of INH. Any adverse event leading to hospitalization or death should be reported to local or state health departments as well as the FDA MedWatch program. (Moderate) Careful monitoring of hepatic function is recommended with the concurrent use of rifampin and aminosalicylate sodium, aminosalicylic acid. Each drug has the potential to cause hepatotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity risk may be increased with concomitant use. These drugs may be used together for the treatment of active tuberculosis (TB) infection, and patients should also be assessed for additional risk factors for hepatotoxicity, such as other hepatotoxic drugs, alcohol use, and underlying hepatic disease. Aminosalicylic acid has previously been reported to block the absorption of rifampin; however, this was due to an excipient not included in the aminosalicylic acid granules. Oral administration of a solution of both agents showed full absorption of each product. Any adverse event leading to hospitalization or death should be reported to local or state health departments as well as the FDA MedWatch program.
    Ketoprofen: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Ketorolac: (Severe) Increased adverse gastrointestinal and other effects are possible if ketorolac is used with salicylates. In addition, concomitant administration of salicylates and ketorolac has resulted in a reduction in protein binding and a two-fold increase in unbound plasma concentrations of ketorolac. As a result, concomitant use of ketorolac and aspirin or any other NSAID is contraindicated. Because ketorolac can cause GI bleeding, inhibit platelet aggregation, and may prolong bleeding time, additive effects may be seen in patients receiving platelet inhibitors (e.g., aspirin), anticoagulants, or thrombolytic agents.
    Lansoprazole; Naproxen: (Major) Aspirin, ASA displaces naproxen from binding to albumin and increases naproxen excretion. Due to an increased free fraction of naproxen, increased adverse gastrointestinal effects are possible if naproxen is used with aspirin. In addition, further benefit with use of the two drugs as compared with aspirin monotherapy is not apparent, and antagonism of the irreversible platelet effect of aspirin occurs with concurrent use. The interaction appears to be due to competition at the enzyme active site. Patients who take low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular health may have the beneficial effects of aspirin on platelet function counteracted by naproxen. Concomitant aspirin and naproxen use is not recommended. The use of Naproxen with other salicylates can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Linagliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents, such as linagliptin.
    Linagliptin; Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents, such as linagliptin.
    Lisinopril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Loop diuretics: (Moderate) Salicylates may decrease the diuretic, natriuretic, and antihypertensive actions of diuretics, possibly through inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. Patients receiving loop diuretics and salicylates should be monitored for changes in the effectiveness of their diuretic therapy.
    Low Molecular Weight Heparins: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving a low molecular weight heparin in combination with other agents known to increase the risk of bleeding such as salicylates. Monitor clinical and laboratory response closely during concurrent use.
    Mannitol: (Minor) Mannitol promotes the urinary excretion of salicylates, barbiturates, imipramine, and bromides, and it may be used as an adjunct in patients with severe intoxication of these substances. In addition, salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics because salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance.
    Measles Virus; Mumps Virus; Rubella Virus; Varicella Virus Vaccine, Live: (Major) No adverse events associated with the use of salicylates after varicella vaccination have been reported. However, the manufacturer of varicella virus vaccine live recommends the avoidance of salicylates or aspirin, ASA use for 6 weeks after vaccination. Reye's syndrome, which exclusively affects children under 15 years old, has been associated with aspirin use following active varicella infection. Vaccination with close clinical monitoring is recommended for children who require therapeutic aspirin, ASA therapy; according to the CDC the use of attenuated, live varicella virus vaccine is thought to present less risk than natural varicella disease to such children.
    Meclofenamate Sodium: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Mefenamic Acid: (Major) Increased adverse gastrointestinal (GI) effects are possible if mefenamic acid is used with salicylates. In addition, concomitant administration of salicylates and mefenamic acid may result in an increase in unbound plasma concentrations of either drug, which could result in greater adverse effects. In general, concomitant use of aspirin and mefenamic acid is not recommended.
    Meglitinides: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of antidiabetic agents. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose or use of greater than maximum recommended daily dosages, salicylates can cause either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients who receive antidiabetic agents.
    Meloxicam: (Major) Additive adverse gastrointestinal (GI) effects are possible if meloxicam is used with salicylates (e.g., aspirin). The concurrent use of aspirin and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) does increase the risk of serious gastrointestinal events. Concomitant administration of aspirin, ASA (3000 mg/day) to healthy volunteers increased the meloxicam AUC by 10% and increased the meloxicam peak plasma concentrations by 24%. Because of its lack of platelet effects, meloxicam is not a substitute for aspirin for cardiovascular prophylaxis.
    Metformin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control.
    Metformin; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Metformin; Repaglinide: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of antidiabetic agents. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose or use of greater than maximum recommended daily dosages, salicylates can cause either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients who receive antidiabetic agents.
    Metformin; Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Metformin; Saxagliptin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, decreasing blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving saxagliptin.
    Metformin; Sitagliptin: (Moderate) Large doses of salicylates may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. If these agents are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, decreasing blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Methazolamide: (Major) Avoid the coadministration of high-dose salicylates and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, like methazolamide, whenever possible. The combination yielded reports of anorexia, tachypnea, lethargy, metabolic acidosis, coma, and death. The mechanism appears to be accumulation of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, resulting in increased CNS depression and metabolic acidosis. The acidosis may allow greater CNS penetration of the salicylate.
    Methotrexate: (Severe) Caution should be exercised when salicylates are given in combination with methotrexate. Since both are weak acids, salicylates can impair the renal secretion of methotrexate and increase the risk of methotrexate toxicity. Salicylates can also displace methotrexate from protein-binding sites. Although the risk for drug interactions with methotrexate is greatest during high-dose methotrexate therapy, it has been recommended that any of these drugs be used cautiously with methotrexate even when methotrexate is used in low doses for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. A significantly higher incidence of leukopenia has been reported in patients taking aspirin during methotrexate therapy. In addition, large doses of salicylates (>= 3 to 4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding.
    Methyclothiazide: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Metolazone: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Moexipril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Mycophenolate: (Moderate) Mycophenolic acid is more than 98% bound to albumin. Concurrent use of mycophenolate with salicylates can decrease the protein binding of mycophenolic acid resulting in an increase in the free fraction of MPA. Patients should be observed for increased clinical effects from mycophenolate as well as additive adverse effects.
    Nabumetone: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Naproxen: (Major) Aspirin, ASA displaces naproxen from binding to albumin and increases naproxen excretion. Due to an increased free fraction of naproxen, increased adverse gastrointestinal effects are possible if naproxen is used with aspirin. In addition, further benefit with use of the two drugs as compared with aspirin monotherapy is not apparent, and antagonism of the irreversible platelet effect of aspirin occurs with concurrent use. The interaction appears to be due to competition at the enzyme active site. Patients who take low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular health may have the beneficial effects of aspirin on platelet function counteracted by naproxen. Concomitant aspirin and naproxen use is not recommended. The use of Naproxen with other salicylates can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Naproxen; Pseudoephedrine: (Major) Aspirin, ASA displaces naproxen from binding to albumin and increases naproxen excretion. Due to an increased free fraction of naproxen, increased adverse gastrointestinal effects are possible if naproxen is used with aspirin. In addition, further benefit with use of the two drugs as compared with aspirin monotherapy is not apparent, and antagonism of the irreversible platelet effect of aspirin occurs with concurrent use. The interaction appears to be due to competition at the enzyme active site. Patients who take low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular health may have the beneficial effects of aspirin on platelet function counteracted by naproxen. Concomitant aspirin and naproxen use is not recommended. The use of Naproxen with other salicylates can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Naproxen; Sumatriptan: (Major) Aspirin, ASA displaces naproxen from binding to albumin and increases naproxen excretion. Due to an increased free fraction of naproxen, increased adverse gastrointestinal effects are possible if naproxen is used with aspirin. In addition, further benefit with use of the two drugs as compared with aspirin monotherapy is not apparent, and antagonism of the irreversible platelet effect of aspirin occurs with concurrent use. The interaction appears to be due to competition at the enzyme active site. Patients who take low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular health may have the beneficial effects of aspirin on platelet function counteracted by naproxen. Concomitant aspirin and naproxen use is not recommended. The use of Naproxen with other salicylates can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Nateglinide: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of antidiabetic agents. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose or use of greater than maximum recommended daily dosages, salicylates can cause either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients who receive antidiabetic agents.
    Nilotinib: (Moderate) Nilotinib can cause thrombocytopenia. Large doses of salicylates (3 to 4 g/day or higher) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding.
    Nitazoxanide: (Moderate) The active metabolite of nitazoxanide, tizoxanide, is highly bound to plasma proteins. Caution should be exercised when administering nitazoxanide concurrently with other highly plasma protein-bound drugs with narrow therapeutic indices because competition for binding sites may occur.
    Oxaprozin: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Pentosan: (Moderate) Pentosan is a weak anticoagulant. Pentosan has 1/15 the anticoagulant activity of heparin. An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving other platelet inhibitors (e.g. aspirin, ASA) in combination with pentosan. Also, large doses of salicylates (>= 3-4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding.
    Perindopril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Perindopril; Amlodipine: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Phentermine; Topiramate: (Moderate) Concurrent use of topiramate and drugs that affect platelet function such as aspirin, ASA and other salicylates may increase the risk of bleeding. In a pooled analysis of placebo-controlled trials, bleeding was more frequently reported in patients receiving topiramate (4.5%) compared to placebo (2 to 3%). In those with severe bleeding events, patients were often taking drugs that cause thrombocytopenia or affect platelet function or coagulation.
    Phenytoin: (Minor) Large doses of salicylates can displace phenytoin from plasma protein-binding sites. Although increased serum concentrations of unbound phenytoin may lead to phenytoin toxicity, the liver may also more rapidly clear unbound drug. Displacement of phenytoin from binding sites can lead to a decrease in the total phenytoin serum concentration. Close monitoring for excessive phenytoin toxicity or decreased phenytoin efficacy is recommended.
    Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Piroxicam: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Polymyxins: (Major) Theoretically, the chronic coadministration of these drugs may increase the risk of developing nephrotoxicity, even in patients who have normal renal function. Monitor patients for changes in renal function if these drugs are coadministered. Since colistimethate sodium is eliminated by the kidney, coadministration with other potentially nephrotoxic drugs, including salicylates, may increase serum concentrations of either drug.
    Potassium Citrate: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents, like potassium citrate, increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Potassium Salts: (Moderate) Urinary alkalinizing agents, like potassium citrate, increase the excretion of salicylates by increasing renal clearance.
    Potassium-sparing diuretics: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia.
    Pramlintide: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, and thus decrease blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Probenecid: (Severe) Concurrent use of probenecid and salicylates is contraindicated. The uricosuric actions of probenecid are inhibited by salicylates. When probenecid is used to treat hyperuricemia or gout, do not administer with salicylates.
    Psyllium: (Moderate) Psyllium can interfere with the absorption of certain oral drugs if administered concomitantly. For example, psyllium fiber can adsorb salicylates. Per the psyllium manufacturers, administration of other prescribed oral drugs should be separated from the administration of psyllium by at least 2 hours.
    Pyrazinamide, PZA: (Moderate) Careful monitoring of hepatic function is recommended with the concurrent use of pyrazinamide, PZA and aminosalicylate sodium, aminosalicylic acid. Each drug has the potential to cause hepatotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity risk may be increased with concomitant use. These drugs may be used together for the treatment of active tuberculosis (TB) infection, and patients should also be assessed for additional risk factors for hepatotoxicity, such as other hepatotoxic drugs, alcohol use, and underlying hepatic disease. Any adverse event leading to hospitalization or death should be reported to local or state health departments as well as the FDA MedWatch program.
    Quinapril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Ramipril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Repaglinide: (Moderate) Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of antidiabetic agents. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose or use of greater than maximum recommended daily dosages, salicylates can cause either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients who receive antidiabetic agents.
    Rifabutin: (Moderate) Careful monitoring of hepatic function is recommended with the concurrent use of rifabutin and aminosalicylate sodium, aminosalicylic acid. Each drug has the potential to cause hepatotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity risk may be increased with concomitant use. These drugs may be used together for the treatment of active tuberculosis (TB) infection, and patients should also be assessed for additional risk factors for hepatotoxicity, such as other hepatotoxic drugs, alcohol use, and underlying hepatic disease. Any adverse event leading to hospitalization or death should be reported to local or state health departments as well as the FDA MedWatch program.
    Rifampin: (Moderate) Careful monitoring of hepatic function is recommended with the concurrent use of rifampin and aminosalicylate sodium, aminosalicylic acid. Each drug has the potential to cause hepatotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity risk may be increased with concomitant use. These drugs may be used together for the treatment of active tuberculosis (TB) infection, and patients should also be assessed for additional risk factors for hepatotoxicity, such as other hepatotoxic drugs, alcohol use, and underlying hepatic disease. Aminosalicylic acid has previously been reported to block the absorption of rifampin; however, this was due to an excipient not included in the aminosalicylic acid granules. Oral administration of a solution of both agents showed full absorption of each product. Any adverse event leading to hospitalization or death should be reported to local or state health departments as well as the FDA MedWatch program.
    Rituximab; Hyaluronidase: (Minor) Salicylates, when given in large systemic doses, may render tissues partially resistant to the action of hyaluronidase. Patients receiving these medications may require larger amounts of hyaluronidase for equivalent dispersing effect.
    Rivaroxaban: (Major) Salicylates such as aspirin are known to increase bleeding, and bleeding risk may be increased when these drugs are used concomitantly with rivaroxaban. The safety of long-term concomitant use of these drugs has not been studied. Promptly evaluate any signs or symptoms of blood loss if patients are treated concomitantly with salicylates. In a single-dose drug interaction study, no pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions were observed after concomitant administration of naproxen or acetylsalicylic acid with rivaroxaban.
    Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Salicylic Acid: (Moderate) Concomitant use of salicylic acid with other drugs which may contribute to elevated serum salicylate levels (e.g., oral aspirin or other oral salicylates and other salicylate containing medications, such as sports injury creams) should be avoided. Concurrent use may result in excessive exposure to salicylic acid. Consider replacing aspirin therapy with an alternative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent that is not salicylate based where appropriate.
    Saxagliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, decreasing blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving saxagliptin.
    Serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors: (Moderate) Platelet aggregation may be impaired by serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) due to platelet serotonin depletion, possibly increasing the risk of a bleeding complication (e.g., gastrointestinal bleeding, ecchymoses, epistaxis, hematomas, petechiae, hemorrhage) in patients receiving aspirin, ASA or other salicylates which affect hemostasis. Patients should be instructed to monitor for signs and symptoms of bleeding while taking an SNRI with medications which impair platelet function and to promptly report any bleeding events to the practitioner.
    Simvastatin; Sitagliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, decreasing blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Sitagliptin: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion, decreasing blood glucose concentrations. In large doses, salicylates may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. After acute overdose, aspirin can cause either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Large doses of aspirin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Sodium Hyaluronate, Hyaluronic Acid: (Moderate) Increased bruising or bleeding at the injection site may occur when using hyaluronate sodium with salicylates, especially if used within the 3 weeks prior to the procedure.
    Sodium Thiosulfate; Salicylic Acid: (Moderate) Concomitant use of salicylic acid with other drugs which may contribute to elevated serum salicylate levels (e.g., oral aspirin or other oral salicylates and other salicylate containing medications, such as sports injury creams) should be avoided. Concurrent use may result in excessive exposure to salicylic acid. Consider replacing aspirin therapy with an alternative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent that is not salicylate based where appropriate.
    Spironolactone: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia.
    Sulfinpyrazone: (Major) Salicylates should not be used concurrently with probenecid or sulfinpyrazone when these are used to treat hyperuricemia or gout because the uricosuric effect can be decreased. In addition, probenecid and sulfinpyrazone can decrease salicylic acid excretion leading to increased plasma concentration.
    Sulfonamides: (Minor) Due to high protein binding, salicylates could be displaced from binding sites, or could displace other highly protein-bound drugs such as sulfonamides. An enhanced effect of the displaced drug may occur.
    Sulindac: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Tacrolimus: (Moderate) Tacrolimus, in the absence of overt renal impairment, may adversely affect renal function. Care should be taken in using tacrolimus with other nephrotoxic drugs, such as salicylates.
    Telavancin: (Minor) Concurrent or sequential use of telavancin with drugs that inhibit renal prostaglandins such as salicylates may lead to additive nephrotoxicity. Closely monitor renal function and adjust telavancin doses based on calculated creatinine clearance.
    Tenofovir Alafenamide: (Moderate) Tenofovir-containing products should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent, such as salicylates. Tenofovir is primarily excreted via the kidneys by a combination of glomerular filtration and active tubular secretion. Coadministration of tenofovir alafenamide with drugs that are eliminated by active tubular secretion may increase concentrations of tenofovir and/or the co-administered drug. Drugs that decrease renal function may also increase concentrations of tenofovir. Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Monitor patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus, and urine glucose and protein.
    Tenofovir, PMPA: (Major) Renal impairment, which may include hypophosphatemia, has been reported with the use of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate with a majority of the cases occurring in patients who have underlying systemic or renal disease or who are concurrently taking nephrotoxic agents. Tenofovir should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent; patients receiving concomitant nephrotoxic agents, like salicylates should be carefully monitored for changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus.
    Thiazide diuretics: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Thiazolidinediones: (Moderate) Salicylates can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar. In large doses, salicylates can cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Thrombin Inhibitors: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving salicylates (e.g. aspirin, ASA) in combination with thrombin inhibitors. In addition, large doses of salicylates (>= 3-4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may also increase bleeding risk when given with argatroban because of their potential to cause GI bleeding or inhibit platelet aggregation.
    Thrombolytic Agents: (Moderate) Concurrent administration of thrombolytic agents and salicylates may further increase the serious risk of bleeding.
    Tinzaparin: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving a low molecular weight heparin in combination with other agents known to increase the risk of bleeding such as salicylates. Monitor clinical and laboratory response closely during concurrent use.
    Tolmetin: (Major) The concurrent use of aspirin with other NSAIDs should be avoided because this may increase bleeding or lead to decreased renal function. The use of salicylates together with NSAIDs can also lead to additive GI toxicity.
    Topiramate: (Moderate) Concurrent use of topiramate and drugs that affect platelet function such as aspirin, ASA and other salicylates may increase the risk of bleeding. In a pooled analysis of placebo-controlled trials, bleeding was more frequently reported in patients receiving topiramate (4.5%) compared to placebo (2 to 3%). In those with severe bleeding events, patients were often taking drugs that cause thrombocytopenia or affect platelet function or coagulation.
    Torsemide: (Moderate) Salicylates may decrease the diuretic, natriuretic, and antihypertensive actions of diuretics, possibly through inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. Patients receiving loop diuretics and salicylates should be monitored for changes in the effectiveness of their diuretic therapy.
    Trandolapril: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Trandolapril; Verapamil: (Moderate) Aspirin, ASA may reduce the vasodilatory efficacy of ACE inhibitors by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilatory prostaglandins. This interaction has been documented primarily in heart failure patients. However, the established benefits of using aspirin in combination with an ACE inhibitor in patients with ischemic heart disease and left ventricular dysfunction generally outweigh this concern. Patients receiving concurrent salicylates and ACE inhibitor therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive or vasodilatory efficacy; the dose of the ACE inhibitor can be adjusted if indicated based on clinical evaluation.
    Trazodone: (Moderate) The combined use of trazodone and salicylates that affect hemostasis may elevate the risk for an upper GI bleed. Trazodone may inhibit serotonin uptake by platelets, augmenting the antiplatelet effects of salicylates. Additionally, salicylates impair the gastric mucosa defenses by inhibiting prostaglandin formation. It would be prudent for clinicians to monitor the patient's clinical status closely if trazodone is added to or removed from the regimen of a patient stabilized on salicylate therapy.
    Treprostinil: (Moderate) When used concurrently with anticoagulants or platelet inhibitors, treprostinil may increase the risk of bleeding.
    Triamterene: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal insufficiency in patients receiving diuretics, secondary to effects on renal blood flow. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin production, which causes salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. This combination may cause hyperkalemia.
    Valproic Acid, Divalproex Sodium: (Moderate) Concurrent salicylate therapy can increase the free-fraction of valproic acid, causing possible valproic acid toxicity. Valproic acid levels should be monitored when these agents are used concomitantly.
    Vancomycin: (Minor) Due to the inhibition of renal prostaglandins by salicylates, concurrent use of salicylates and other nephrotoxic agents, such as vancomycin, may lead to additive nephrotoxicity.
    Varicella-Zoster Virus Vaccine, Live: (Major) No adverse events associated with the use of salicylates after varicella vaccination have been reported. However, the manufacturer of varicella virus vaccine live recommends the avoidance of salicylates or aspirin, ASA use for 6 weeks after vaccination. Reye's syndrome, which exclusively affects children under 15 years old, has been associated with aspirin use following active varicella infection. Vaccination with close clinical monitoring is recommended for children who require therapeutic aspirin, ASA therapy; according to the CDC the use of attenuated, live varicella virus vaccine is thought to present less risk than natural varicella disease to such children.
    Vilazodone: (Moderate) Patients should be instructed to monitor for signs and symptoms of bleeding while taking vilazodone concurrently with salicylates or other platelet inhibitors and to promptly report any bleeding events to the practitioner. Platelet aggregation may be impaired by vilazodone due to platelet serotonin depletion, possibly increasing the risk of a bleeding complication (e.g., gastrointestinal bleeding, ecchymoses, epistaxis, hematomas, petechiae, hemorrhage) in patients receiving platelet inhibitors (e.g., aspirin, cilostazol, clopidogrel, dipyridamole, ticlopidine, platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors).
    Vortioxetine: (Moderate) Platelet aggregation may be impaired by vortioxetine due to platelet serotonin depletion, possibly increasing the risk of a bleeding complication (e.g., gastrointestinal bleeding, ecchymoses, epistaxis, hematomas, petechiae, hemorrhage) in patients receiving aspirin, ASA or other salicylates. Bleeding events related to drugs that inhibit serotonin reuptake have ranged from ecchymosis to life-threatening hemorrhages. Patients should be instructed to monitor for signs and symptoms of bleeding while taking vortioxetine concurrently with aspirin products and to promptly report any bleeding events to the practitioner.

    PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

    Pregnancy

    Aminosalicylic acid is designated as pregnancy category C. There has been potential occipital malformation in animal studies; however, since literature reports in humans have always reported coadministration with other medications, there have been no adequate studies in humans. The manufacturer recommends that aminosalicylic acid should only be given during pregnancy in the benefits to the mother outweighs the risk to the fetus.

    Small amounts of aminosalicylic acid may be excreted in breast milk and the manufacturer recommends caution with use in breast-feeding women. After administration of a different preparation of aminosalicylic acid to one patient, the maximum concentration in the milk was 1 mcg/mL at 3 hours with a half-life of 2.5 hours; the maximum maternal plasma concentration was 70 mcg/mL at two hours. Aminosalicylic acid was used as part of multidrug regimens to treat two pregnant women with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, one throughout pregnancy and postpartum and the other postpartum only. The infants were breastfed (extent and duration not stated) and the children were developing normally except for a mild speech delay in one and hyperactivity in the other. Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential infant drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding infant experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally administered drug, healthcare providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

    MECHANISM OF ACTION

    Aminosalicylic acid is bacteriostatic against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It has been postulated that aminosalicylic acid inhibits folic acid synthesis (without potentiation with antifolic compounds) and/or inhibits the synthesis of the cell wall component, mycobactin; therefore, reducing iron uptake by M. tuberculosis. Aminosalicylic acid may also inhibit the onset of bacterial resistance to streptomycin and isoniazid.

    PHARMACOKINETICS

    Aminosalicylic acid is administered orally. Approximately 50—60% of the drug is protein bound with binding reduced by 50% in kwashiorkor. The half-life in healthy volunteers was 26.4 minutes. Penetration into the cerebrospinal fluid occurs only with inflamed meninges. Approximately 80% of aminosalicylic acid is excreted in the urine, with 50% or more of the dosage excreted in acetylated form. The acetylation process is genetically determined. Aminosalicylic acid is excreted by glomerular filtration; however, probenecid does not enhance plasma concentrations.

    Oral Route

    Aminosalicylic acid granules are enteric coated. Unprotected granules are decarboxylated to form meta-aminophenol, a known hepatotoxin when exposed to gastric fluid. The acid-resistant coating of the granules protects them from degradation in the stomach. Suspension in an acidic drink or food will protect the coating for at least 2 hours. The small granules are also designed to escape the usual restriction on gastric emptying of large particles. Under neutral conditions, such as in the small intestine, the acid-resistant coating dissolves within 1 minute. In a single 4 g dose pharmacokinetic study with food in normal volunteers, the initial time to a 2 mcg/mL serum concentration was 2 hours (range 45 min to 24 hours). The median time to peak was 6 hours (range 1.5—24 hours). The mean peak concentration was 20 mcg/mL (range 9—35 mcg/mL). A concentration of 2 mcg/mL was maintained for an average of 7.9 hours (range 5—9 hours) and a concentration of 1 mcg/mL was maintained for an average of 8.8 hours (range 6—11.5 hours).