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  • CLASSES

    Centrally-Acting Antiobesity Agents

    DEA CLASS

    Rx, schedule IV

    DESCRIPTION

    Oral sympathomimetic amine pharmacologically similar to amphetamines
    Used for short-term (a few weeks) treatment of exogenous obesity in patients 17 years and older; use generally not recommended by guidelines due to lack of longer-term health benefits
    Not recommended for long-term use; there is abuse and addiction potential

    COMMON BRAND NAMES

    Adipex-P, Atti-Plex P, Atti-Plex P Spansule, Fastin, Lomaira, Pro-Fast, Tara-8

    HOW SUPPLIED

    Adipex-P/Atti-Plex P Spansule/Fastin/Phentermine Hydrochloride/Pro-Fast Oral Cap: 15mg, 18.75mg, 30mg, 37.5mg
    Adipex-P/Atti-Plex P/Lomaira/Phentermine Hydrochloride/Pro-Fast/Tara-8 Oral Tab: 8mg, 37.5mg

    DOSAGE & INDICATIONS

    For the short-term (i.e., a few weeks) treatment of exogenous obesity.
    Oral dosage (phentermine hydrochloride 15 mg or more per oral capsule or tablet; e.g., Adipex-P)
    Adults and Adolescents 17 years and older

    15 to 37.5 mg PO once per day as a single dose every morning before breakfast or approximately 2 hours after breakfast. Some tablets with a score may be divided, with 18.75 mg (half-tablet) given in the morning and the other half-tablet later in the day (but not in the late evening), if needed. For some patients 18.75 mg PO once daily is sufficient. Geriatric patients may require a lower dosage. INTENDED USE: For patients with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or more or those with a BMI 27 kg/m2 or more in the presence of at least 1 other weight-related risk factor (e.g., controlled hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or dyslipidemia). Use as monotherapy; for short-term use only.[46595] According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology (AACE/ACE) Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines, short-term pharmacotherapy, such as with phentermine, has not been shown to produce longer-term health benefits in obese and overweight patients and cannot be generally recommended.[62881]

    Oral dosage (phentermine 8 mg tablet; e.g., Lomaira)
    Adults and Adolescents 17 years and older

    8 mg PO 3 times per day, 30 minutes before meals. Dosing selection in geriatric patients should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range. One-half of the usual dose (i.e., 4 mg PO 3 times per day) may be used for patients not requiring the full dose. Use the lowest effective dose. Avoid late evening dosing due to the potential for insomnia. INTENDED USE: For patients with a BMI 30 kg/m2 or more or those with a BMI 27 kg/m2 or more in the presence of at least 1 other weight-related risk factor (e.g., controlled hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or dyslipidemia). Use as monotherapy; for short-term use only. According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology (AACE/ACE) Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines, short-term pharmacotherapy, such as with phentermine, has not been shown to produce longer-term health benefits in obese and overweight patients and cannot be generally recommended.

    MAXIMUM DOSAGE

    Adults

    37.5 mg/day PO.

    Elderly

    37.5 mg/day PO. May require reduced dosage compared to younger adults.

    Adolescents

     > 16 years: 37.5 mg/day PO.
     <= 16 years: Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    Children

    Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

    Hepatic Impairment

    The effects of hepatic impairment on phentermine and its metabolites are unknown.

    Renal Impairment

    Phentermine 8 mg tablets (e.g., Lomaira):
    Use with caution. Specific guidelines for dosage adjustments in renal impairment are not available. Based on the reported excretion of phentermine in urine, exposure increases can be expected in patients with renal impairment.
     
    Phentermine 15 mg and 30 mg tablets (generic manufacturers):
    eGFR greater than 29 mL/min/1.73 m2: No dosage adjustment required.
    eGFR 15 to 29 mL/min/1.73 m2: Do not exceed 15 mg/day PO.
    eGFR less than 15 mL/min/1.73 m2: Avoid use.
     
    Phentermine HCl 37.5 mg tablets and capsules equivalent to 30 mg of phentermine base (e.g., Adipex-P):
    eGFR greater than 29 mL/min/1.73 m2: No dosage adjustment required.
    eGFR 15 to 29 mL/min/1.73 m2: Do not exceed 15 mg/day PO.
    eGFR less than 15 mL/min/1.73 m2: Avoid use.
     
    Intermittent hemodialysis
    Some manufacturers (e.g., Adipex-P) recommend avoiding the drug in patients with end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis. There are no recommendations for Lomaira in patients receiving dialysis.

    ADMINISTRATION

    For storage information, see the specific product information within the How supplied section.

    Oral Administration

    Phentermine hydrochloride oral capsules or tablets (Adipex-P or equivalent 15 mg to 37.5 mg products):
    The usual dose is administered daily before breakfast or 1 to 2 hours after breakfast.
    Tablets may contain a score to allow daily dose to be divided in half and administered before meals or 1 to 2 hours after meals.
    Avoid late evening administration because of the possibility of insomnia.
     
    Phentermine hydrochloride oral tablets (Lomaira 8 mg tablet or an equivalent 8 mg product):
    The usual dose is administered three times per day, 30 minutes before meals.
    The tablets are scored for administration of one-half of the usual dosage for patients not requiring the full dose.
    Avoid late evening administration because of the possibility of insomnia.

    STORAGE

    Generic:
    - Store between 68 to 77 degrees F, excursions permitted 59 to 86 degrees F
    Adipex-P:
    - Store between 68 to 77 degrees F, excursions permitted 59 to 86 degrees F
    Atti-Plex P :
    - Store between 68 to 77 degrees F, excursions permitted 59 to 86 degrees F
    Atti-Plex P Spansule :
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Fastin:
    - Store between 68 to 77 degrees F, excursions permitted 59 to 86 degrees F
    Ionamin:
    - Store at 77 degrees F; excursions permitted to 59-86 degrees F
    Lomaira :
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Pro-Fast:
    - Discard product if it contains particulate matter, is cloudy, or discolored
    - Protect from light
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    - Store in original container
    Suprenza:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)

    CONTRAINDICATIONS / PRECAUTIONS

    General Information

    Phentermine is contraindicated for use in any patient with a prior history of sympathomimetic amine hypersensitivity or idiosyncratic reaction to sympathomimetic amines.

    Angina, cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac disease, coronary artery disease, heart failure, hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, stroke, valvular heart disease

    Phentermine is contraindicated in patients with a history of cardiac disease, including coronary artery disease, stroke, cardiac arrhythmias, heart failure, or uncontrolled hypertension. Patients with controlled hypertension should receive phentermine with caution and with close monitoring of blood pressure. Valvular heart disease has been reported in women receiving the combination of fenfluramine and phentermine; the safety and efficacy of combination therapy with phentermine and any other drug products for weight loss, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (e.g., fluoxetine, sertraline, fluvoxamine, paroxetine), have not been established. Therefore, coadministration of these drug products for weight loss is not recommended. Further, primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) has been reported to occur in patients receiving a combination of phentermine with fenfluramine or dexfenfluramine. The possibility of an association between the use of phentermine alone and PPH or valvular heart disease cannot be ruled out. The initial symptom of PPH is usually dyspnea. Other initial symptoms include: angina pectoris, syncope, or lower extremity edema. Patients should be advised to report immediately any deterioration in exercise tolerance. Treatment should be discontinued in patients who develop new, unexplained symptoms of dyspnea, angina pectoris, syncope, or lower extremity edema.

    Hyperthyroidism, thyroid disease

    Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic agent, it is contraindicated in patients with hyperthyroidism. It should also be used with caution in patients with thyroid disease.

    MAOI therapy

    Phentermine is contraindicated for use during or within 14 days following MAOI therapy because of the risk of hypertensive crisis.

    Anxiety, insomnia, mania, psychosis, schizophrenia

    Phentermine is contraindicated in patients with agitated states. Psychiatric conditions that may be associated with agitated states include but are not limited to anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, psychosis, and mania. Use with caution in such patients and monitor closely for changes in moods and behaviors or for insomnia. Symptoms of chronic intoxication include insomnia, irritability, change in personality, and psychotic symptoms that may be clinically indistinguishable from other psychotic disorders, like schizophrenia.

    Driving or operating machinery, ethanol ingestion

    The use of phentermine may cause dizziness, mask signs of fatigue or the need for rest, or impair the ability of a patient to participate in activities that require mental alertness. Advise patients to use caution when driving or operating machinery, or performing other tasks that require mental alertness until they are aware of how therapy will affect their mental and/or motor performance. In general, ethanol ingestion may aggravate these effects or cause an adverse drug reaction. Advise patients to avoid alcohol while taking phentermine.

    Diabetes mellitus

    Use phentermine cautiously in patients with diabetes mellitus. Insulin or other antidiabetic medication requirements may be altered in these patients when using phentermine during weight loss and due to altered dietary regimens. Patients should monitor their blood glucose regularly and follow the recommendations of their health care provider.

    Anorexia nervosa, substance abuse

    Appetite suppressant therapy is not recommend for use in those patients with a history of anorexia nervosa or other eating disorders. Use of phentermine is contraindicated in patients with a known history of drug or substance abuse. Phentermine is chemically and pharmacologically related to the amphetamines which have been extensively abused. The possibility of abuse of phentermine should be kept in mind when evaluating the desirability of including a drug as part of a weight reduction program. The least amount reasonable should be prescribed or dispensed at one time in order to limit the potential for overuse or drug diversion.

    Abrupt discontinuation

    Abrupt discontinuation of phentermine after prolonged high doses may result in severe mental depression or extreme fatigue; sleep EEG changes have also been noted. Gradual withdrawal of therapy is recommended. If immediate discontinuation is medically necessary, careful monitoring and symptom management is warranted.

    Closed-angle glaucoma

    Phentermine is contraindicated in patients with closed-angle glaucoma. Sympathetic stimulation that occurs with phentermine can block aqueous outflow and raise intraocular pressure. Patients should be advised to report any new visual disturbance since an ophthalmic evaluation may be needed.

    Dialysis, geriatric, renal disease, renal failure, renal impairment

    The debilitated or geriatric patient may be more susceptible to the CNS and sympathomimetic side effects of phentermine; use with caution in geriatric patients. Patients with renal impairment or renal disease may also be more susceptible to side effects resulting from increased systemic exposure to phentermine. Caution is recommended when administering phentermine to patients with mild to moderate renal impairment, although no dosage adjustments are required. Some manufacturers (e.g., Adipex-P) recommend a reduced daily maximum dose in severe renal impairment (eGFR 15 to 29 mL/min/1.73 m2) and avoiding phentermine in patients with renal failure, including those receiving dialysis.

    Pregnancy

    Phentermine products are contraindicated for use during human pregnancy, as are many anorexiants used for weight loss. Safe use of phentermine during pregnancy has not been established; there is no known indication for use of phentermine during pregnancy. Phentermine should not be taken by women who may become pregnant unless, in the opinion of the physician, the potential benefits outweigh the possible hazards.

    Breast-feeding

    Phentermine is contraindicated during breast-feeding. It is not known whether phentermine and its metabolites are excreted in breast milk; however, because of the potential for serious adverse effects in the nursing infants, breast-feeding while taking phentermine is not recommended..

    Children, infants

    Safety and effectiveness of phentermine in children have not been established. Phentermine is not recommended for children or adolescents 16 years of age and under. There is no established use of phentermine in infants.

    Surgery

    The use of inhalational anesthetics during surgery may sensitize the myocardium to the effects of sympathomimetic drugs. Because of this, and its effects on blood pressure, in general, phentermine should be discontinued several days prior to surgery.

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Severe

    cardiac valvulopathy / Delayed / 0-1.0
    pulmonary hypertension / Delayed / 0-1.0

    Moderate

    euphoria / Early / 1.0-10.0
    dysphoria / Early / 1.0-10.0
    constipation / Delayed / 1.0-10.0
    psychosis / Early / 0-1.0
    tolerance / Delayed / 10.0
    dyspnea / Early / Incidence not known
    sinus tachycardia / Rapid / Incidence not known
    palpitations / Early / Incidence not known
    hypertension / Early / Incidence not known
    peripheral edema / Delayed / Incidence not known
    angina / Early / Incidence not known
    impotence (erectile dysfunction) / Delayed / Incidence not known
    psychological dependence / Delayed / Incidence not known
    withdrawal / Early / Incidence not known
    physiological dependence / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Mild

    restlessness / Early / 1.0-10.0
    insomnia / Early / 1.0-10.0
    headache / Early / 1.0-10.0
    dizziness / Early / 1.0-10.0
    tremor / Early / 1.0-10.0
    xerostomia / Early / 1.0-10.0
    diarrhea / Early / 1.0-10.0
    nausea / Early / 1.0-10.0
    dysgeusia / Early / 1.0-10.0
    urticaria / Rapid / 0-1.0
    syncope / Early / Incidence not known
    libido decrease / Delayed / Incidence not known
    libido increase / Delayed / Incidence not known

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Acarbose: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Acebutolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Acetaminophen; Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Magnesium Salicylate; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Phenyltoloxamine; Salicylamide: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine; Phenyltoloxamine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Acetaminophen; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Aclidinium; Formoterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when formoterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Albiglutide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Albuterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when albuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Albuterol; Ipratropium: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when albuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Aliskiren; Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Aliskiren; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Alogliptin; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Alpha-blockers: (Moderate) Monitor for desired antihypertensive effect of alpha-blockers when administered with phentermine, Sympathomimetics like phentermine can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives such as alpha-blockers when administered concomitantly.
    Alpha-glucosidase Inhibitors: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Ambrisentan: (Major) Sympathomimetics, such as phentermine, can antagonize the effects of vasodilators such as ambrisentan when administered concomitantly. Patients should be monitored for reduced efficacy if taking ambrisentan with a sympathomimetic.
    Amifampridine: (Major) Carefully consider the need for concomitant treatment with phentermine and amifampridine, as coadministration may increase the risk of seizures. If coadministration occurs, closely monitor patients for seizure activity. Seizures have been observed in patients without a history of seizures taking amifampridine at recommended doses. Phentermine may increase the risk of seizures.
    Amiloride; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Amitriptyline: (Moderate) Use phentermine and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) together with caution and close clinical monitoring. Regularly assess blood pressure, heart rate, the efficacy of weight loss treatment, and the emergence of sympathomimetic/adrenergic adverse events. Carefully adjust dosages as clinically indicated. Phentermine is a sympathomimetic agent related to the amphetamines and may cause additive sympathomimetic effects when combined with the tricyclic antidepressants. Additive CNS effects (e.g., dizziness) may also occur.
    Amitriptyline; Chlordiazepoxide: (Moderate) Use phentermine and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) together with caution and close clinical monitoring. Regularly assess blood pressure, heart rate, the efficacy of weight loss treatment, and the emergence of sympathomimetic/adrenergic adverse events. Carefully adjust dosages as clinically indicated. Phentermine is a sympathomimetic agent related to the amphetamines and may cause additive sympathomimetic effects when combined with the tricyclic antidepressants. Additive CNS effects (e.g., dizziness) may also occur.
    Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Olmesartan: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Valsartan: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Amoxapine: (Moderate) Use phentermine and amoxapine together with caution and close clinical monitoring. Regularly assess blood pressure, heart rate, the efficacy of weight loss treatment, and the emergence of sympathomimetic/adrenergic adverse events. Carefully adjust dosages as clinically indicated. Amoxapine has pharmacologic activity similar to tricylclic antidepressant agents. Phentermine is a sympathomimetic agent related to the amphetamines and may cause additive sympathomimetic effects when combined with amoxapine. CNS effects, such as dizziness, are also possible.
    Amphetamine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of phentermine with amphetamines may result in additive cardiovascular and CNS adverse effects. Coadministration is not recommended when amphetamines are used for weight loss as safety and efficacy of phentermine in combination with other weight loss products has not been established.
    Amphetamine; Dextroamphetamine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of phentermine with amphetamines may result in additive cardiovascular and CNS adverse effects. Coadministration is not recommended when amphetamines are used for weight loss as safety and efficacy of phentermine in combination with other weight loss products has not been established.
    Amphetamines: (Moderate) Concurrent use of phentermine with amphetamines may result in additive cardiovascular and CNS adverse effects. Coadministration is not recommended when amphetamines are used for weight loss as safety and efficacy of phentermine in combination with other weight loss products has not been established.
    Arformoterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when arformoterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Orphenadrine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Atenolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Atenolol; Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly. (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Atomoxetine: (Major) Due to the potential for increases in blood pressure and heart rate, atomoxetine should be used cautiously with drugs with sympathomimetic activity such as phentermine. Consider monitoring the patient's blood pressure and heart rate at baseline and regularly if sympathomimetics are coadministered with atomoxetine.
    Azilsartan; Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Belladonna Alkaloids; Ergotamine; Phenobarbital: (Major) Phentermine, which increases catecholamine release, can increase blood pressure; this effect may be additive with the prolonged vasoconstriction caused by ergot alkaloids. Monitoring for cardiac effects during concurrent use of ergot alkaloids with phentermine may be advisable.
    Benazepril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Bendroflumethiazide; Nadolol: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly. (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Benzphetamine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of phentermine with amphetamines may result in additive cardiovascular and CNS adverse effects. Coadministration is not recommended when amphetamines are used for weight loss as safety and efficacy of phentermine in combination with other weight loss products has not been established.
    Beta-blockers: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Betaxolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Bethanechol: (Moderate) Bethanechol offsets the effects of sympathomimetics at sites where sympathomimetic and cholinergic receptors have opposite effects.
    Bisoprolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Bisoprolol; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly. (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Bosentan: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with bosentan. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including bosentan. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Bretylium: (Moderate) Monitor blood pressure closely when sympathomimetics are administered with bretylium. The pressor effects of catecholamines are enhanced by bretylium.
    Brimonidine; Timolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Bromocriptine: (Moderate) The combination of bromocriptine with phentermine may cause headache, tachycardia, other cardiovascular abnormalities, seizures, and other serious effects. Concurrent use of bromocriptine and phentermine should be approached with caution.
    Brompheniramine; Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Budesonide; Formoterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when formoterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Bupropion: (Major) Bupropion is associated with a dose-related risk of seizures. Excessive use of psychostimulants, such as phentermine, may be associated with an increased seizure risk; therefore, seizures may be more likely to occur in patients receiving this weight loss aide with bupropion. Patients should be closely monitored if this combination is necessary. Do not combine therapy with phentermine or phentermine-combinations and bupropion; naltrexone due to this risk and the duplication of therapy for weight loss.
    Bupropion; Naltrexone: (Major) Bupropion is associated with a dose-related risk of seizures. Excessive use of psychostimulants, such as phentermine, may be associated with an increased seizure risk; therefore, seizures may be more likely to occur in patients receiving this weight loss aide with bupropion. Patients should be closely monitored if this combination is necessary. Do not combine therapy with phentermine or phentermine-combinations and bupropion; naltrexone due to this risk and the duplication of therapy for weight loss.
    Cabergoline: (Minor) In theory, an interaction is possible between cabergoline, an ergot derivative, and some sympathomimetic agents such as vasopressors (e.g., norepinephrine, dopamine), cocaine, epinephrine, phenylpropanolamine, ephedra, ma huang, pseudoephedrine, amphetamines, and phentermine. Use of the ergot derivative bromocriptine for lactation suppression in conjunction with a sympathomimetic (i.e., isometheptene or phenylpropanolamine) for other therapeutic uses has resulted in adverse effects such as worsening headache, hypertension, ventricular tachycardia, seizures, sudden loss of vision, and cerebral vasospasm.
    Caffeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Caffeine; Ergotamine: (Major) Phentermine, which increases catecholamine release, can increase blood pressure; this effect may be additive with the prolonged vasoconstriction caused by ergot alkaloids. Monitoring for cardiac effects during concurrent use of ergot alkaloids with phentermine may be advisable. (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Canagliflozin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Canagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Candesartan; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Captopril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Carbetapentane; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Carbetapentane; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Carbetapentane; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine; Pyrilamine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Carbinoxamine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Carbinoxamine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Cardiac glycosides: (Major) Concomitant use of cardiac glycosides with sympathomimetics can cause arrhythmias because sympathomimetics enhance ectopic pacemaker activity. Caution is warranted during co-administration of digoxin and sympathomimetics.
    Carteolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Carvedilol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Chlophedianol; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Chlorothiazide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dihydrocodeine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Chlorthalidone; Clonidine: (Major) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the antihypertensive effects of clonidine when administered concomitantly. Patients should be monitored for loss of blood pressure control. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Clomipramine: (Moderate) Use phentermine and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) together with caution and close clinical monitoring. Regularly assess blood pressure, heart rate, the efficacy of weight loss treatment, and the emergence of sympathomimetic/adrenergic adverse events. Carefully adjust dosages as clinically indicated. Phentermine is a sympathomimetic agent related to the amphetamines and may cause additive sympathomimetic effects when combined with the tricyclic antidepressants. Additive CNS effects (e.g., dizziness) may also occur.
    Clonidine: (Major) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the antihypertensive effects of clonidine when administered concomitantly. Patients should be monitored for loss of blood pressure control.
    Cocaine: (Major) Avoid concomitant use of additional vasoconstrictor agents with cocaine. If unavoidable, prolonged vital sign and ECG monitoring may be required. Myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction, and ventricular arrhythmias have been reported after concomitant administration of topical intranasal cocaine and vasoconstrictor agents during nasal and sinus surgery.
    Codeine; Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Colchicine: (Minor) The response to sympathomimetics may be enhanced by colchicine.
    Colchicine; Probenecid: (Minor) The response to sympathomimetics may be enhanced by colchicine.
    Dapagliflozin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Dapagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Dapagliflozin; Saxagliptin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Desflurane: (Major) Halogenated anesthetics may sensitize the myocardium to the effects of the sympathomimetics. Because of this, and its effects on blood pressure, phentermine should be discontinued several days prior to surgery.
    Desipramine: (Moderate) Use phentermine and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) together with caution and close clinical monitoring. Regularly assess blood pressure, heart rate, the efficacy of weight loss treatment, and the emergence of sympathomimetic/adrenergic adverse events. Carefully adjust dosages as clinically indicated. Phentermine is a sympathomimetic agent related to the amphetamines and may cause additive sympathomimetic effects when combined with the tricyclic antidepressants. Additive CNS effects (e.g., dizziness) may also occur.
    Desvenlafaxine: (Moderate) Use phentermine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) together with caution; use together may be safe and efficacious for some patients based on available data, provided the patient is on a stable antidepressant regimen and receives close clinical monitoring. Regular appointments to assess the efficacy of the weight loss treatment, the emergence of adverse events, and blood pressure monitoring are recommended. Watch for excessive serotonergic effects. Phentermine is related to the amphetamines, and there has been historical concern that phentermine might exhibit potential to cause serotonin syndrome or cardiovascular or pulmonary effects when combined with serotonergic agents. One case report describes adverse reactions with phentermine and fluoxetine. However, recent data suggest that phentermine's effect on MAO inhibition and serotonin augmentation is minimal at therapeutic doses, and that phentermine does not additionally increase plasma serotonin levels when combined with other serotonergic agents. In large controlled clinical studies, patients were allowed to start therapy with phentermine or phentermine; topiramate extended-release for obesity along with their antidepressants (e.g., SSRIs or SNRIs, but not MAOIs or TCAs) as long as the antidepressant dose had been stable for at least 3 months prior to the initiation of phentermine, and the patient did not have suicidal ideation or more than 1 episode of major depression documented. In analyses of the results, therapy was generally well tolerated, especially at lower phentermine doses, based on discontinuation rates and reported adverse events. Because depression and obesity often coexist, the study data may be important to providing optimal therapies.
    Dextroamphetamine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of phentermine with amphetamines may result in additive cardiovascular and CNS adverse effects. Coadministration is not recommended when amphetamines are used for weight loss as safety and efficacy of phentermine in combination with other weight loss products has not been established.
    Dextromethorphan; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Digitoxin: (Major) Concomitant use of cardiac glycosides with sympathomimetics can cause arrhythmias because sympathomimetics enhance ectopic pacemaker activity. Caution is warranted during co-administration of digoxin and sympathomimetics.
    Digoxin: (Major) Concomitant use of cardiac glycosides with sympathomimetics can cause arrhythmias because sympathomimetics enhance ectopic pacemaker activity. Caution is warranted during co-administration of digoxin and sympathomimetics.
    Dihydroergotamine: (Major) Phentermine, which increases catecholamine release, can increase blood pressure; this effect may be additive with the prolonged vasoconstriction caused by ergot alkaloids. Monitoring for cardiac effects during concurrent use of ergot alkaloids with phentermine may be advisable.
    Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Diphenhydramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Dopamine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Dorzolamide; Timolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Doxazosin: (Moderate) Monitor for desired antihypertensive effect of alpha-blockers when administered with phentermine, Sympathomimetics like phentermine can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives such as alpha-blockers when administered concomitantly.
    Doxepin: (Moderate) Use phentermine and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) together with caution and close clinical monitoring. Regularly assess blood pressure, heart rate, the efficacy of weight loss treatment, and the emergence of sympathomimetic/adrenergic adverse events. Carefully adjust dosages as clinically indicated. Phentermine is a sympathomimetic agent related to the amphetamines and may cause additive sympathomimetic effects when combined with the tricyclic antidepressants. Additive CNS effects (e.g., dizziness) may also occur.
    Dronabinol: (Moderate) Concurrent use of dronabinol, THC with sympathomimetics may result in additive hypertension, tachycardia, and possibly cardiotoxicity. Dronabinol, THC has been associated with occasional hypotension, hypertension, syncope, and tachycardia. In a study of 7 adult males, combinations of IV cocaine and smoked marijuana, 1 g marijuana cigarette, 0 to 2.7% delta-9-THC, increased the heart rate above levels seen with either agent alone, with increases plateauing at 50 bpm.
    Droxidopa: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Dulaglutide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Duloxetine: (Moderate) Use phentermine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) together with caution; use together may be safe and efficacious for some patients based on available data, provided the patient is on a stable antidepressant regimen and receives close clinical monitoring. Regular appointments to assess the efficacy of the weight loss treatment, the emergence of adverse events, and blood pressure monitoring are recommended. Watch for excessive serotonergic effects. Phentermine is related to the amphetamines, and there has been historical concern that phentermine might exhibit potential to cause serotonin syndrome or cardiovascular or pulmonary effects when combined with serotonergic agents. One case report describes adverse reactions with phentermine and fluoxetine. However, recent data suggest that phentermine's effect on MAO inhibition and serotonin augmentation is minimal at therapeutic doses, and that phentermine does not additionally increase plasma serotonin levels when combined with other serotonergic agents. In large controlled clinical studies, patients were allowed to start therapy with phentermine or phentermine; topiramate extended-release for obesity along with their antidepressants (e.g., SSRIs or SNRIs, but not MAOIs or TCAs) as long as the antidepressant dose had been stable for at least 3 months prior to the initiation of phentermine, and the patient did not have suicidal ideation or more than 1 episode of major depression documented. In analyses of the results, therapy was generally well tolerated, especially at lower phentermine doses, based on discontinuation rates and reported adverse events. Because depression and obesity often coexist, the study data may be important to providing optimal therapies.
    Dyphylline: (Moderate) Use of sympathomimetics with dyphylline should be approached with caution. Coadministration may lead to adverse effects, such as tremors, insomnia, seizures, or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Dyphylline; Guaifenesin: (Moderate) Use of sympathomimetics with dyphylline should be approached with caution. Coadministration may lead to adverse effects, such as tremors, insomnia, seizures, or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Empagliflozin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Empagliflozin; Linagliptin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Empagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Enalapril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Enflurane: (Major) Halogenated anesthetics may sensitize the myocardium to the effects of the sympathomimetics. Because of this, and its effects on blood pressure, phentermine should be discontinued several days prior to surgery.
    Ephedrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Epoprostenol: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with epoprostenol. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including epoprostenol. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Eprosartan; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Ergoloid Mesylates: (Major) Phentermine, which increases catecholamine release, can increase blood pressure; this effect may be additive with the prolonged vasoconstriction caused by ergot alkaloids. Monitoring for cardiac effects during concurrent use of ergot alkaloids with phentermine may be advisable.
    Ergonovine: (Major) Phentermine, which increases catecholamine release, can increase blood pressure; this effect may be additive with the prolonged vasoconstriction caused by ergot alkaloids. Monitoring for cardiac effects during concurrent use of ergot alkaloids with phentermine may be advisable.
    Ergot alkaloids: (Major) Phentermine, which increases catecholamine release, can increase blood pressure; this effect may be additive with the prolonged vasoconstriction caused by ergot alkaloids. Monitoring for cardiac effects during concurrent use of ergot alkaloids with phentermine may be advisable.
    Ergotamine: (Major) Phentermine, which increases catecholamine release, can increase blood pressure; this effect may be additive with the prolonged vasoconstriction caused by ergot alkaloids. Monitoring for cardiac effects during concurrent use of ergot alkaloids with phentermine may be advisable.
    Ertugliflozin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Ertugliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Ertugliflozin; Sitagliptin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Esketamine: (Major) Closely monitor blood pressure during concomitant use of esketamine and phentermine. Coadministration of psychostimulants, such as phentermine, with esketamine may increase blood pressure.
    Esmolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Exenatide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Fluticasone; Salmeterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should also be used when salmeterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Fluticasone; Umeclidinium; Vilanterol: (Moderate) Administer sympathomimetics with caution with beta-agonists such as vilanterol. The cardiovascular effects of beta-2 agonists may be potentiated by concomitant use. Monitor the patient for tremors, nervousness, increased heart rate, or other additive side effects.
    Fluticasone; Vilanterol: (Moderate) Administer sympathomimetics with caution with beta-agonists such as vilanterol. The cardiovascular effects of beta-2 agonists may be potentiated by concomitant use. Monitor the patient for tremors, nervousness, increased heart rate, or other additive side effects.
    Formoterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when formoterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Formoterol; Mometasone: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when formoterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Fosinopril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Glimepiride; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Glimepiride; Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Glycopyrrolate; Formoterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when formoterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Green Tea: (Major) Some, but not all, green tea products contain caffeine. Additive CNS stimulant effects are likely to occur when caffeine is coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants. Caffeine should be avoided or used cautiously with phentermine.
    Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Guanabenz: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the antihypertensive effects of guanabenz when administered concomitantly. Patients should be monitored for loss of blood pressure control.
    Halogenated Anesthetics: (Major) Halogenated anesthetics may sensitize the myocardium to the effects of the sympathomimetics. Because of this, and its effects on blood pressure, phentermine should be discontinued several days prior to surgery.
    Halothane: (Major) Halogenated anesthetics may sensitize the myocardium to the effects of the sympathomimetics. Because of this, and its effects on blood pressure, phentermine should be discontinued several days prior to surgery.
    Hydralazine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Irbesartan: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Lisinopril: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Losartan: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Methyldopa: (Major) Phentermine has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of antihypertensive agents particularly sympatholytic agents such as methyldopa. Concomitant use of phentermine with methyldopa may antagonize the antihypertensive effects of these agents. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between phentermine and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Metoprolol: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly. (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Moexipril: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Olmesartan: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Propranolol: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly. (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Quinapril: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Spironolactone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Telmisartan: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Triamterene: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Valsartan: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Iloprost: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with iloprost. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including iloprost. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Imipramine: (Moderate) Use phentermine and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) together with caution and close clinical monitoring. Regularly assess blood pressure, heart rate, the efficacy of weight loss treatment, and the emergence of sympathomimetic/adrenergic adverse events. Carefully adjust dosages as clinically indicated. Phentermine is a sympathomimetic agent related to the amphetamines and may cause additive sympathomimetic effects when combined with the tricyclic antidepressants. Additive CNS effects (e.g., dizziness) may also occur.
    Incretin Mimetics: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Indacaterol: (Moderate) Administer sympathomimetics with caution with beta-agonists such as indacaterol. The cardiovascular effects of beta-2 agonists may be potentiated by concomitant use. Monitor the patient for tremors, nervousness, increased heart rate, or other additive side effects.
    Indacaterol; Glycopyrrolate: (Moderate) Administer sympathomimetics with caution with beta-agonists such as indacaterol. The cardiovascular effects of beta-2 agonists may be potentiated by concomitant use. Monitor the patient for tremors, nervousness, increased heart rate, or other additive side effects.
    Indapamide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the antihypertensive effects of vasodilators when administered concomitantly. Patients should be monitored to confirm that the desired antihypertensive effect is achieved.
    Insulin Degludec; Liraglutide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Insulin Glargine; Lixisenatide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Insulins: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Iobenguane I 131: (Major) Discontinue sympathomimetics for at least 5 half-lives before the administration of the dosimetry dose or a therapeutic dose of iobenguane I-131. Do not restart sympathomimetics until at least 7 days after each iobenguane I-131 dose. Drugs that reduce catecholamine uptake or deplete catecholamine stores, such as sympathomimetics, may interfere with iobenguane I-131 uptake into cells and interfere with dosimetry calculations resulting in altered iobenguane I-131 efficacy.
    Iohexol: (Major) Phentermine lowers the seizure threshold and should be discontinued at least 48 hours before and for at least 24 hours after intrathecal use of contrast media.
    Iopamidol: (Major) Phentermine lowers the seizure threshold and should be discontinued at least 48 hours before and for at least 24 hours after intrathecal use of contrast media.
    Iopromide: (Major) Phentermine lowers the seizure threshold and should be discontinued at least 48 hours before and for at least 24 hours after intrathecal use of contrast media.
    Ioversol: (Major) Phentermine lowers the seizure threshold and should be discontinued at least 48 hours before and for at least 24 hours after intrathecal use of contrast media.
    Isocarboxazid: (Severe) In general, all types of sympathomimetics and psychostimulants should be avoided in patients receiving MAOIs due to an increased risk of hypertensive crisis. This applies to sympathomimetics including stimulants for ADHD, narcolepsy or weight loss, nasal, oral, and ophthalmic decongestants and cold products, and even respiratory sympathomimetics (e.g., beta agonist drugs). Some local anesthetics also contain a sympathomimetic (e.g., epinephrine). In general, medicines containing sympathomimetic agents should not be used concurrently with MAOIs or within 14 days before or after their use.
    Isoflurane: (Major) Halogenated anesthetics may sensitize the myocardium to the effects of the sympathomimetics. Because of this, and its effects on blood pressure, phentermine should be discontinued several days prior to surgery.
    Isosulfan Blue: (Major) Phentermine lowers the seizure threshold and should be discontinued at least 48 hours before and for at least 24 hours after intrathecal use of contrast media.
    Labetalol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Levalbuterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when albuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Levobetaxolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Levobunolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Levomilnacipran: (Moderate) Use phentermine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) together with caution; use together may be safe and efficacious for some patients based on available data, provided the patient is on a stable antidepressant regimen and receives close clinical monitoring. Regular appointments to assess the efficacy of the weight loss treatment, the emergence of adverse events, and blood pressure monitoring are recommended. Watch for excessive serotonergic effects. Phentermine is related to the amphetamines, and there has been historical concern that phentermine might exhibit potential to cause serotonin syndrome or cardiovascular or pulmonary effects when combined with serotonergic agents. One case report describes adverse reactions with phentermine and fluoxetine. However, recent data suggest that phentermine's effect on MAO inhibition and serotonin augmentation is minimal at therapeutic doses, and that phentermine does not additionally increase plasma serotonin levels when combined with other serotonergic agents. In large controlled clinical studies, patients were allowed to start therapy with phentermine or phentermine; topiramate extended-release for obesity along with their antidepressants (e.g., SSRIs or SNRIs, but not MAOIs or TCAs) as long as the antidepressant dose had been stable for at least 3 months prior to the initiation of phentermine, and the patient did not have suicidal ideation or more than 1 episode of major depression documented. In analyses of the results, therapy was generally well tolerated, especially at lower phentermine doses, based on discontinuation rates and reported adverse events. Because depression and obesity often coexist, the study data may be important to providing optimal therapies.
    Levothyroxine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic amines should be used with caution in patients with thyrotoxicosis since these patients are unusually responsive to sympathomimetic amines. Based on the cardiovascular stimulatory effects of sympathomimetic drugs, the concomitant use of sympathomimetics and thyroid hormones can enhance the effects on the cardiovascular system. Patients with coronary artery disease have an increased risk of coronary insufficiency from either agent. Concomitant use of these agents may increase this risk further. In addition, dopamine at a dose of >= 1 mcg/kg/min and dopamine agonists (e.g., apomorphine, bromocriptine, levodopa, pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine) may result in a transient reduction in TSH secretion. The reduction in TSH secretion is not sustained; hypothyroidism does not occur.
    Levothyroxine; Liothyronine (Porcine): (Moderate) Sympathomimetic amines should be used with caution in patients with thyrotoxicosis since these patients are unusually responsive to sympathomimetic amines. Based on the cardiovascular stimulatory effects of sympathomimetic drugs, the concomitant use of sympathomimetics and thyroid hormones can enhance the effects on the cardiovascular system. Patients with coronary artery disease have an increased risk of coronary insufficiency from either agent. Concomitant use of these agents may increase this risk further. In addition, dopamine at a dose of >= 1 mcg/kg/min and dopamine agonists (e.g., apomorphine, bromocriptine, levodopa, pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine) may result in a transient reduction in TSH secretion. The reduction in TSH secretion is not sustained; hypothyroidism does not occur.
    Levothyroxine; Liothyronine (Synthetic): (Moderate) Sympathomimetic amines should be used with caution in patients with thyrotoxicosis since these patients are unusually responsive to sympathomimetic amines. Based on the cardiovascular stimulatory effects of sympathomimetic drugs, the concomitant use of sympathomimetics and thyroid hormones can enhance the effects on the cardiovascular system. Patients with coronary artery disease have an increased risk of coronary insufficiency from either agent. Concomitant use of these agents may increase this risk further. In addition, dopamine at a dose of >= 1 mcg/kg/min and dopamine agonists (e.g., apomorphine, bromocriptine, levodopa, pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine) may result in a transient reduction in TSH secretion. The reduction in TSH secretion is not sustained; hypothyroidism does not occur.
    Linezolid: (Major) Phentermine should not be administered during or within 14 days following the use of linezolid. Linezolid is an antibiotic that is also a weak, reversible nonselective inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO). Drugs that possess MAO-inhibiting activity, such as linezolid, can prolong and intensify the cardiac stimulation and vasopressor effects of phentermine which may invoke a hypertensive reaction. Additonally, phentermine has a weak ability to dose-dependently raise serotonin levels. Linezolid has the potential for interaction with serotonergic agents, which may increase the risk for serotonin syndrome. If coadministration is necessary, closely monitor for increased blood pressure and signs of serotonin syndrome.
    Liothyronine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic amines should be used with caution in patients with thyrotoxicosis since these patients are unusually responsive to sympathomimetic amines. Based on the cardiovascular stimulatory effects of sympathomimetic drugs, the concomitant use of sympathomimetics and thyroid hormones can enhance the effects on the cardiovascular system. Patients with coronary artery disease have an increased risk of coronary insufficiency from either agent. Concomitant use of these agents may increase this risk further. In addition, dopamine at a dose of >= 1 mcg/kg/min and dopamine agonists (e.g., apomorphine, bromocriptine, levodopa, pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine) may result in a transient reduction in TSH secretion. The reduction in TSH secretion is not sustained; hypothyroidism does not occur.
    Liraglutide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Lisdexamfetamine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of phentermine with amphetamines may result in additive cardiovascular and CNS adverse effects. Coadministration is not recommended when amphetamines are used for weight loss as safety and efficacy of phentermine in combination with other weight loss products has not been established.
    Lixisenatide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Lorcaserin: (Major) The safety and efficacy of coadministration of lorcaserin with other products intended for weight loss including prescription drugs (e.g., phentermine, fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine, orlistat, phendimetrazine, amphetamines), over-the-counter drugs (e.g., orlistat, phenylpropanolamine, ephedrine), and herbal preparations (ephedra, Ma huang) have not been established. Some of these agents (fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine) are known to increase the risk for cardiac valvulopathy and pulmonary hypertension. Coadministration of sibutramine with other serotonergic medications is contraindicated due to the risk for serotonin-related adverse effects, such as serotonin syndrome.
    Macitentan: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with macitentan. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including macitentan. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Maprotiline: (Moderate) Use maprotiline and sympathomimetics together with caution and close clinical monitoring. Regularly assess blood pressure, heart rate, the efficacy of treatment, and the emergence of sympathomimetic/adrenergic adverse events. Carefully adjust dosages as clinically indicated. Maprotiline has pharmacologic activity similar to tricyclic antidepressant agents and may cause additive sympathomimetic effects when combined with agents with adrenergic/sympathomimetic activity.
    Meglitinides: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Metaproterenol: (Major) Caution and close observation should also be used when metaproterenol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Metformin; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Metformin; Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Methamphetamine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of phentermine with amphetamines may result in additive cardiovascular and CNS adverse effects. Coadministration is not recommended when amphetamines are used for weight loss as safety and efficacy of phentermine in combination with other weight loss products has not been established.
    Methyclothiazide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Methyldopa: (Major) Phentermine has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of antihypertensive agents particularly sympatholytic agents such as methyldopa. Concomitant use of phentermine with methyldopa may antagonize the antihypertensive effects of these agents. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between phentermine and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Methylergonovine: (Major) Phentermine, which increases catecholamine release, can increase blood pressure; this effect may be additive with the prolonged vasoconstriction caused by ergot alkaloids. Monitoring for cardiac effects during concurrent use of ergot alkaloids with phentermine may be advisable.
    Methysergide: (Major) Phentermine, which increases catecholamine release, can increase blood pressure; this effect may be additive with the prolonged vasoconstriction caused by ergot alkaloids. Monitoring for cardiac effects during concurrent use of ergot alkaloids with phentermine may be advisable.
    Metolazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Metoprolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Midodrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Miglitol: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Milnacipran: (Moderate) Use phentermine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) together with caution; use together may be safe and efficacious for some patients based on available data, provided the patient is on a stable antidepressant regimen and receives close clinical monitoring. Regular appointments to assess the efficacy of the weight loss treatment, the emergence of adverse events, and blood pressure monitoring are recommended. Watch for excessive serotonergic effects. Phentermine is related to the amphetamines, and there has been historical concern that phentermine might exhibit potential to cause serotonin syndrome or cardiovascular or pulmonary effects when combined with serotonergic agents. One case report describes adverse reactions with phentermine and fluoxetine. However, recent data suggest that phentermine's effect on MAO inhibition and serotonin augmentation is minimal at therapeutic doses, and that phentermine does not additionally increase plasma serotonin levels when combined with other serotonergic agents. In large controlled clinical studies, patients were allowed to start therapy with phentermine or phentermine; topiramate extended-release for obesity along with their antidepressants (e.g., SSRIs or SNRIs, but not MAOIs or TCAs) as long as the antidepressant dose had been stable for at least 3 months prior to the initiation of phentermine, and the patient did not have suicidal ideation or more than 1 episode of major depression documented. In analyses of the results, therapy was generally well tolerated, especially at lower phentermine doses, based on discontinuation rates and reported adverse events. Because depression and obesity often coexist, the study data may be important to providing optimal therapies.
    Mirtazapine: (Major) Because of the potential risk and severity of serotonin syndrome, caution should be observed during co-administration of mirtazapine with other drugs that have serotonergic properties. As a drug related to the amphetamines, phentermine has the potential to cause serotonin syndrome when combined with serotonergic agents. Serotonin syndrome is characterized by the rapid development of hyperthermia, hypertension, myoclonus, rigidity, autonomic instability, mental status changes (e.g., delirium or coma), and in rare cases, death. Patients receiving this combination should be monitored for the emergence of serotonin syndrome. Mirtazapine should be discontinued if a patient develops a combination of symptoms suggestive of serotonin syndrome.
    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors: (Severe) In general, all types of sympathomimetics and psychostimulants should be avoided in patients receiving MAOIs due to an increased risk of hypertensive crisis. This applies to sympathomimetics including stimulants for ADHD, narcolepsy or weight loss, nasal, oral, and ophthalmic decongestants and cold products, and even respiratory sympathomimetics (e.g., beta agonist drugs). Some local anesthetics also contain a sympathomimetic (e.g., epinephrine). In general, medicines containing sympathomimetic agents should not be used concurrently with MAOIs or within 14 days before or after their use.
    Nabilone: (Moderate) Concurrent use of nabilone with sympathomimetics (e.g., amphetamine or cocaine) may result in additive hypertension, tachycardia, and possibly cardiotoxicity. In a study of 7 adult males, combinations of cocaine (IV) and smoked marijuana (1 g marijuana cigarette, 0 to 2.7% delta-9-THC) increased the heart rate above levels seen with either agent alone, with increases reaching a plateau at 50 bpm.
    Nadolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Nebivolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Nebivolol; Valsartan: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Nitrates: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the antianginal effects of nitrates, and can increase blood pressure and/or heart rate. Anginal pain may be induced when coronary insufficiency is present.
    Non-Ionic Contrast Media: (Major) Phentermine lowers the seizure threshold and should be discontinued at least 48 hours before and for at least 24 hours after intrathecal use of contrast media.
    Norepinephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Nortriptyline: (Moderate) Use phentermine and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) together with caution and close clinical monitoring. Regularly assess blood pressure, heart rate, the efficacy of weight loss treatment, and the emergence of sympathomimetic/adrenergic adverse events. Carefully adjust dosages as clinically indicated. Phentermine is a sympathomimetic agent related to the amphetamines and may cause additive sympathomimetic effects when combined with the tricyclic antidepressants. Additive CNS effects (e.g., dizziness) may also occur.
    Orlistat: (Moderate) The safety and efficacy of coadministration of phentermine with other products intended for weight loss has not been established.
    Penbutolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Pergolide: (Major) Phentermine, which increases catecholamine release, can increase blood pressure; this effect may be additive with the prolonged vasoconstriction caused by ergot alkaloids. Monitoring for cardiac effects during concurrent use of ergot alkaloids with phentermine may be advisable.
    Perphenazine; Amitriptyline: (Moderate) Use phentermine and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) together with caution and close clinical monitoring. Regularly assess blood pressure, heart rate, the efficacy of weight loss treatment, and the emergence of sympathomimetic/adrenergic adverse events. Carefully adjust dosages as clinically indicated. Phentermine is a sympathomimetic agent related to the amphetamines and may cause additive sympathomimetic effects when combined with the tricyclic antidepressants. Additive CNS effects (e.g., dizziness) may also occur.
    Phendimetrazine: (Severe) Phendimetrazine is a phenylalkaline sympathomimetic agent. All sympathomimetics and psychostimulants, including other anorexiants, should be used cautiously or avoided in patients receiving phendimetrazine. The safety of phendimetrazine when used with other anorexiants such as phentermine is controversial and concurrent use should be avoided. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmia. Similarly, phendimetrazine should not be used in combination with OTC preparations and herbal products that may contain ephedra alkaloids or Ma huang.
    Phenelzine: (Severe) In general, all types of sympathomimetics and psychostimulants should be avoided in patients receiving MAOIs due to an increased risk of hypertensive crisis. This applies to sympathomimetics including stimulants for ADHD, narcolepsy or weight loss, nasal, oral, and ophthalmic decongestants and cold products, and even respiratory sympathomimetics (e.g., beta agonist drugs). Some local anesthetics also contain a sympathomimetic (e.g., epinephrine). In general, medicines containing sympathomimetic agents should not be used concurrently with MAOIs or within 14 days before or after their use.
    Phenoxybenzamine: (Moderate) Monitor for desired antihypertensive effect of alpha-blockers when administered with phentermine, Sympathomimetics like phentermine can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives such as alpha-blockers when administered concomitantly.
    Phentolamine: (Moderate) Monitor for desired antihypertensive effect of alpha-blockers when administered with phentermine, Sympathomimetics like phentermine can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives such as alpha-blockers when administered concomitantly.
    Phenylephrine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Pindolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Pirbuterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should also be used when pirbuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Pramlintide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Prazosin: (Moderate) Monitor for desired antihypertensive effect of alpha-blockers when administered with phentermine, Sympathomimetics like phentermine can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives such as alpha-blockers when administered concomitantly.
    Procarbazine: (Major) Because procarbazine exhibits some monoamine oxidase inhibitory (MAOI) activity, sympathomimetic drugs should be avoided. As with MAOIs, the use of a sympathomimetic drug with procarbazine may precipitate hypertensive crisis or other serious side effects. In the presence of MAOIs, drugs that cause release of norepinephrine induce severe cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses. In general, do not use a sympathomimetic drug unless clinically necessary (e.g., medical emergencies, agents like dopamine) within the 14 days prior, during or 14 days after procarbazine therapy. If use is necessary within 2 weeks of the MAOI drug, in general the initial dose of the sympathomimetic agent must be greatly reduced. Patients should be counseled to avoid non-prescription (OTC) decongestants and other drug products, weight loss products, and energy supplements that contain sympathomimetic agents.
    Propranolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Protriptyline: (Moderate) Use phentermine and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) together with caution and close clinical monitoring. Regularly assess blood pressure, heart rate, the efficacy of weight loss treatment, and the emergence of sympathomimetic/adrenergic adverse events. Carefully adjust dosages as clinically indicated. Phentermine is a sympathomimetic agent related to the amphetamines and may cause additive sympathomimetic effects when combined with the tricyclic antidepressants. Additive CNS effects (e.g., dizziness) may also occur.
    Rasagiline: (Moderate) The concomitant use of rasagiline and sympathomimetics was not allowed in clinical studies; therefore, caution is advised during concurrent use of rasagiline and sympathomimetics including stimulants for ADHD and weight loss, non-prescription nasal, oral, and ophthalmic decongestants, and weight loss dietary supplements containing Ephedra. Although sympathomimetics are contraindicated for use with other non-selective monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), hypertensive reactions generally are not expected to occur during concurrent use with rasagiline because of the selective monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibition of rasagiline at manufacturer recommended doses. One case of elevated blood pressure has been reported in a patient during concurrent use of the recommended dose of rasagiline and ophthalmic tetrahydrozoline. One case of hypertensive crisis has been reported in a patient taking the recommended dose of another MAO-B inhibitor, selegiline, in combination with ephedrine. It should be noted that the MAO-B selectivity of rasagiline decreases in a dose-related manner as increases are made above the recommended daily dose and interactions with sympathomimetics may be more likely to occur at these higher doses.
    Reserpine: (Major) Phentermine has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of antihypertensive agents particularly sympatholytic agents such as reserpine. Concomitant use of phentermine with reserpine may antagonize the antihypertensive effects of these agents. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between phentermine and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Riociguat: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with riociguat. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including riociguat. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Safinamide: (Moderate) Severe hypertensive reactions, including hypertensive crisis, have been reported in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as safinamide, and sympathomimetic medications, such as phentermine. If concomitant use of safinamide and phentermine is necessary, monitor for hypertension and hypertensive crisis.
    Salmeterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should also be used when salmeterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: (Moderate) Use phentermine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) together with caution; use together may be safe and efficacious for some patients based on available data, provided the patient is on a stable antidepressant regimen and receives close clinical monitoring. Regular appointments to assess the efficacy of the weight loss treatment, the emergence of adverse events, and blood pressure monitoring are recommended. Watch for excessive serotonergic effects. Phentermine is related to the amphetamines, and there has been historical concern that phentermine might exhibit potential to cause serotonin syndrome or cardiovascular or pulmonary effects when combined with serotonergic agents. One case report has been received of adverse reactions with phentermine and fluoxetine. However, recent data suggest that phentermine's effect on MAO inhibition and serotonin augmentation is minimal at therapeutic doses, and that phentermine does not additionally increase plasma serotonin levels when combined with other serotonergic agents. In large controlled clinical studies, patients were allowed to start therapy with phentermine or phentermine; topiramate extended-release for obesity along with their antidepressants (e.g., SSRIs or SNRIs, but not MAOIs or TCAs) as long as the antidepressant dose had been stable for at least 3 months prior to the initiation of phentermine, and the patient did not have suicidal ideation or more than 1 episode of major depression documented. In analyses of the results, therapy was generally well tolerated, especially at lower phentermine doses, based on discontinuation rates and reported adverse events. Because depression and obesity often coexist, the study data may be important to providing optimal co-therapies.
    Selegiline: (Severe) In general, all types of sympathomimetics and psychostimulants should be avoided in patients receiving MAOIs due to an increased risk of hypertensive crisis. This applies to sympathomimetics including stimulants for ADHD, narcolepsy or weight loss, nasal, oral, and ophthalmic decongestants and cold products, and even respiratory sympathomimetics (e.g., beta agonist drugs). Some local anesthetics also contain a sympathomimetic (e.g., epinephrine). In general, medicines containing sympathomimetic agents should not be used concurrently with MAOIs or within 14 days before or after their use.
    Selexipag: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with selexipag. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including selexipag. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Semaglutide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors: (Moderate) Use phentermine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) together with caution; use together may be safe and efficacious for some patients based on available data, provided the patient is on a stable antidepressant regimen and receives close clinical monitoring. Regular appointments to assess the efficacy of the weight loss treatment, the emergence of adverse events, and blood pressure monitoring are recommended. Watch for excessive serotonergic effects. Phentermine is related to the amphetamines, and there has been historical concern that phentermine might exhibit potential to cause serotonin syndrome or cardiovascular or pulmonary effects when combined with serotonergic agents. One case report describes adverse reactions with phentermine and fluoxetine. However, recent data suggest that phentermine's effect on MAO inhibition and serotonin augmentation is minimal at therapeutic doses, and that phentermine does not additionally increase plasma serotonin levels when combined with other serotonergic agents. In large controlled clinical studies, patients were allowed to start therapy with phentermine or phentermine; topiramate extended-release for obesity along with their antidepressants (e.g., SSRIs or SNRIs, but not MAOIs or TCAs) as long as the antidepressant dose had been stable for at least 3 months prior to the initiation of phentermine, and the patient did not have suicidal ideation or more than 1 episode of major depression documented. In analyses of the results, therapy was generally well tolerated, especially at lower phentermine doses, based on discontinuation rates and reported adverse events. Because depression and obesity often coexist, the study data may be important to providing optimal therapies.
    Sevoflurane: (Major) Halogenated anesthetics may sensitize the myocardium to the effects of the sympathomimetics. Because of this, and its effects on blood pressure, phentermine should be discontinued several days prior to surgery.
    SGLT2 Inhibitors: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Sibutramine: (Severe) Sibutramine is contraindicated in patients taking other centrally-acting appetite suppressant drugs, such as phentermine. In addition, many of these agents enhance central serotonergic activity by various mechanisms. Concurrent use of sibutramine with other serotonergic agents may increase the potential for serotonin syndrome or neuroleptic malignant syndrome-like reactions. Serotonin syndrome is characterized by rapid development of hyperthermia, hypertension, myoclonus, rigidity, autonomic instability, mental status changes (e.g., delirium or coma), and in rare cases, death. Serotonin syndrome, in its most severe form, can resemble neuroleptic malignant syndrome.
    Sodium Oxybate: (Severe) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent, it should not be used in combination with other psychostimulants.
    Solriamfetol: (Moderate) Monitor blood pressure and heart rate during coadministration of solriamfetol, a norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor, and phentermine, a CNS stimulant. Concurrent use of solriamfetol and other medications that increase blood pressure and/or heart rate may increase the risk of such effects. Coadministration of solriamfetol with other drugs that increase blood pressure or heart rate has not been evaluated.
    Sotalol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    St. John's Wort, Hypericum perforatum: (Major) St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) may reduce the neuronal uptake of monoamines and should be used cautiously with sympathomimetics.
    Sulfonylureas: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Tedizolid: (Moderate) Caution is warranted with the concurrent use of tedizolid and phentermine. Tedizolid is an antibiotic that is also a weak reversible, non-selective inhibitor of MAO which could potentially prolong and intensify the cardiac stimulation and vasopressor effects of phentermine. Phentermine should not be administered during or within 14 days following the use of drugs with MAO-inhibiting activity.
    Terazosin: (Moderate) Monitor for desired antihypertensive effect of alpha-blockers when administered with phentermine, Sympathomimetics like phentermine can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives such as alpha-blockers when administered concomitantly.
    Terbutaline: (Moderate) Concomitant use of sympathomimetics with beta-agonists might result in additive cardiovascular effects such as increased blood pressure and heart rate.
    Theophylline, Aminophylline: (Moderate) Concurrent administration of theophylline or aminophylline with some sympathomimetics can produce excessive stimulation and effects such as nervousness, irritability, or insomnia. (Moderate) Concurrent administration of theophylline or aminophylline with some sympathomimetics can produce excessive stimulation and effects such as nervousness, irritability, or insomnia. Seizures or cardiac arrhythmias are also possible.
    Thiazide diuretics: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Thiazolidinediones: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Thyroid hormones: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic amines should be used with caution in patients with thyrotoxicosis since these patients are unusually responsive to sympathomimetic amines. Based on the cardiovascular stimulatory effects of sympathomimetic drugs, the concomitant use of sympathomimetics and thyroid hormones can enhance the effects on the cardiovascular system. Patients with coronary artery disease have an increased risk of coronary insufficiency from either agent. Concomitant use of these agents may increase this risk further. In addition, dopamine at a dose of >= 1 mcg/kg/min and dopamine agonists (e.g., apomorphine, bromocriptine, levodopa, pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine) may result in a transient reduction in TSH secretion. The reduction in TSH secretion is not sustained; hypothyroidism does not occur.
    Timolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Tranylcypromine: (Severe) In general, all types of sympathomimetics and psychostimulants should be avoided in patients receiving MAOIs due to an increased risk of hypertensive crisis. This applies to sympathomimetics including stimulants for ADHD, narcolepsy or weight loss, nasal, oral, and ophthalmic decongestants and cold products, and even respiratory sympathomimetics (e.g., beta agonist drugs). Some local anesthetics also contain a sympathomimetic (e.g., epinephrine). In general, medicines containing sympathomimetic agents should not be used concurrently with MAOIs or within 14 days before or after their use.
    Treprostinil: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with treprostinil. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including treprostinil. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Tricyclic antidepressants: (Moderate) Use phentermine and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) together with caution and close clinical monitoring. Regularly assess blood pressure, heart rate, the efficacy of weight loss treatment, and the emergence of sympathomimetic/adrenergic adverse events. Carefully adjust dosages as clinically indicated. Phentermine is a sympathomimetic agent related to the amphetamines and may cause additive sympathomimetic effects when combined with the tricyclic antidepressants. Additive CNS effects (e.g., dizziness) may also occur.
    Trimipramine: (Moderate) Use phentermine and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) together with caution and close clinical monitoring. Regularly assess blood pressure, heart rate, the efficacy of weight loss treatment, and the emergence of sympathomimetic/adrenergic adverse events. Carefully adjust dosages as clinically indicated. Phentermine is a sympathomimetic agent related to the amphetamines and may cause additive sympathomimetic effects when combined with the tricyclic antidepressants. Additive CNS effects (e.g., dizziness) may also occur.
    Umeclidinium; Vilanterol: (Moderate) Administer sympathomimetics with caution with beta-agonists such as vilanterol. The cardiovascular effects of beta-2 agonists may be potentiated by concomitant use. Monitor the patient for tremors, nervousness, increased heart rate, or other additive side effects.
    Vasodilators: (Moderate) Use sympathomimetic agents with caution in patients receiving therapy for hypertension. Patients should be monitored to confirm that the desired antihypertensive effect is achieved. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure and heart rate, and antagonize the antihypertensive effects of vasodilators when administered concomitantly. Anginal pain may be induced when coronary insufficiency is present.
    Vasopressors: (Major) Because phentermine is a sympathomimetic and anorexic agent (i.e., psychostimulant) it should not be used in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive side effects, such as hypertensive crisis or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Venlafaxine: (Moderate) Use phentermine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) together with caution; use together may be safe and efficacious for some patients based on available data, provided the patient is on a stable antidepressant regimen and receives close clinical monitoring. Regular appointments to assess the efficacy of the weight loss treatment, the emergence of adverse events, and blood pressure monitoring are recommended. Watch for excessive serotonergic effects. Phentermine is related to the amphetamines, and there has been historical concern that phentermine might exhibit potential to cause serotonin syndrome or cardiovascular or pulmonary effects when combined with serotonergic agents. One case report describes adverse reactions with phentermine and fluoxetine. However, recent data suggest that phentermine's effect on MAO inhibition and serotonin augmentation is minimal at therapeutic doses, and that phentermine does not additionally increase plasma serotonin levels when combined with other serotonergic agents. In large controlled clinical studies, patients were allowed to start therapy with phentermine or phentermine; topiramate extended-release for obesity along with their antidepressants (e.g., SSRIs or SNRIs, but not MAOIs or TCAs) as long as the antidepressant dose had been stable for at least 3 months prior to the initiation of phentermine, and the patient did not have suicidal ideation or more than 1 episode of major depression documented. In analyses of the results, therapy was generally well tolerated, especially at lower phentermine doses, based on discontinuation rates and reported adverse events. Because depression and obesity often coexist, the study data may be important to providing optimal therapies.
    Vilazodone: (Moderate) Use phentermine and vilazodone together with caution; use together might be efficacious for some patients based on available data, provided the patient is on a stable antidepressant regimen and receives close clinical monitoring. Regular appointments to assess the efficacy of the weight loss treatment, the emergence of adverse events, and blood pressure monitoring are recommended. Watch for excessive serotonergic effects. Phentermine is related to the amphetamines, and there has been historical concern that phentermine might exhibit potential to cause serotonin syndrome or cardiovascular or pulmonary effects when combined with serotonergic agents. One case report describes adverse reactions with phentermine and the antidepressant fluoxetine. However, recent data suggest that phentermine's effect on MAO inhibition and serotonin augmentation is minimal at therapeutic doses, and that phentermine does not additionally increase plasma serotonin levels when combined with other serotonergic agents. In large controlled clinical studies, patients were allowed to start therapy with extended-release phentermine or extended-release phentermine combinations for obesity along with their antidepressants (e.g., SSRIs or SNRIs, but not MAOIs or TCAs) as long as the antidepressant dose had been stable for at least 3 months prior to the initiation of phentermine, and the patient did not have suicidal ideation or more than 1 episode of major depression documented. In analyses of the results, therapy was generally well tolerated, especially at lower phentermine doses, based on discontinuation rates and reported adverse events. Because depression and obesity often coexist, the study data may be important to providing optimal therapies.
    Vortioxetine: (Moderate) Use phentermine and vortioxetine together with caution; use together may be safe and efficacious for some patients based on available data, provided the patient is on a stable antidepressant regimen and receives close clinical monitoring. Regular appointments to assess the efficacy of the weight loss treatment, the emergence of adverse events, and blood pressure monitoring are recommended. Watch for excessive serotonergic effects. Phentermine is related to the amphetamines, and there has been historical concern that phentermine might exhibit potential to cause serotonin syndrome or cardiovascular or pulmonary effects when combined with serotonergic agents. One case report has been received of adverse reactions with phentermine and the antidepressant fluoxetine. However, recent data suggest that phentermine's effect on MAO inhibition and serotonin augmentation is minimal at therapeutic doses, and that phentermine does not additionally increase plasma serotonin levels when combined with other serotonergic agents. In large controlled clinical studies, patients were allowed to start therapy with phentermine or phentermine; topiramate extended-release for obesity along with their antidepressants (e.g., SSRIs or SNRIs, but not MAOIs or TCAs) as long as the antidepressant dose had been stable for at least 3 months prior to the initiation of phentermine, and the patient did not have suicidal ideation or more than 1 episode of major depression documented. In analyses of the results, therapy was generally well tolerated, especially at lower phentermine doses, based on discontinuation rates and reported adverse events. Because depression and obesity often coexist, the study data may be important to providing optimal co-therapies.
    Yohimbine: (Major) At high doses, yohimbine may nonselectively inhibit MAO and also, at normal doses, activates the sympathetic nervous system. Traditional MAOIs can cause serious adverse effects when taken concomitantly with sympathomimetics.

    PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

    Pregnancy

    Phentermine products are contraindicated for use during human pregnancy, as are many anorexiants used for weight loss. Safe use of phentermine during pregnancy has not been established; there is no known indication for use of phentermine during pregnancy. Phentermine should not be taken by women who may become pregnant unless, in the opinion of the physician, the potential benefits outweigh the possible hazards.

    Phentermine is contraindicated during breast-feeding. It is not known whether phentermine and its metabolites are excreted in breast milk; however, because of the potential for serious adverse effects in the nursing infants, breast-feeding while taking phentermine is not recommended..

    MECHANISM OF ACTION

    Limited data are available in reference texts regarding the mechanism of action of this drug. Phentermine is an analog of methamphetamine. Similar to the amphetamines, phentermine increases the release of norepinephrine and dopamine from nerve terminals and inhibits their reuptake. Thus, phentermine is classified as an indirect sympathomimetic. Other effects include a weak ability to dose-dependently raise serotonin levels, although the effect on serotonin occurs is less potent than that of methamphetamine itself. Clinical effects include CNS stimulation and elevation of blood pressure. Appetite suppression is believed to occur through direct stimulation of the satiety center in the hypothalamic and limbic region.
     
    Tolerance to the anorexiant effects of phentermine usually develops within a few weeks of starting therapy. The mechanism of tolerance appears to be pharmacodynamic in nature; higher doses of phentermine are required to produce the same response. When tolerance develops to the anorexiant effects, it is generally recommended that phentermine be discontinued rather than the dose increased.

    PHARMACOKINETICS

    Phentermine is administered orally. The rate and extent of phentermine exposure under fasting conditions is equivalent regardless of oral formulation administered.
     
    Limited data exist on the pharmacokinetics of phentermine. Phentermine is primarily excreted by the kidneys. The elimination half-life ranges 19—24 hours and is influenced by urinary pH. Because the pKa of phentermine is 9.84, the elimination half-life decreases to about 7—8 hours under acidic urinary conditions.

    Oral Route

    Following oral administration, most absorption of phentermine occurs from the small intestine. The duration of action following administration of the 8 mg capsules or tablets is about 4 hours and 12—14 hours after administration of the 30 mg capsules or the 37.5 mg tablets.
     
    Phentermine oral disintegrating tablet (ODT) reaches peak concentrations (Cmax) 3—4.4 hours post-administration. Water ingestion prior to swallowing the ODT did not affect the AUC. Despite a decrease in the Cmax (approximately 5%) and AUC (approximately 12%) when phentermine ODT was administered after a high fat/high calorie breakfast, phentermine ODT can be administered with or without food. The Cmax and AUC were decreased by approximately 7% and 8%, respectively, when the ODT was swallowed without prior disintegration.