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  • CLASSES

    Centrally-Acting Antiobesity Products

    DEA CLASS

    Rx, schedule IV

    DESCRIPTION

    Oral sympathomimetic amine that is pharmacologically similar to amphetamines
    Used for the short-term treatment (i.e., a few weeks) of exogenous obesity; not generally recommended by guidelines due to lack of longer-term health benefits
    Not to be used for long-term weight management

    COMMON BRAND NAMES

    Depletite # 2, Durad, Radtue, Tenuate, Tenuate Dospan

    HOW SUPPLIED

    Depletite # 2/Diethylpropion/Diethylpropion Hydrochloride/Radtue/Tenuate Oral Tab: 25mg
    Diethylpropion/Diethylpropion Hydrochloride/Durad/Tenuate Dospan Oral Tab ER: 75mg

    DOSAGE & INDICATIONS

    For the short-term (i.e., a few weeks) treatment of exogenous obesity.
    Oral dosage (immediate-release tablets)
    Adults

    25 mg PO 3 times per day, taken 1 hour before meals. A 25 mg tablet may also be administered in the mid-evening if desired to overcome nighttime hunger. INTENDED USE: For patients with an initial body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m2 or more who have not responded to appropriate weight reducing regimen (diet and/or exercise) alone. According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology (AACE/ACE) Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines, short-term pharmacotherapy, such as with diethylpropion, has not been shown to produce longer-term health benefits in obese and overweight patients and cannot be generally recommended. Diethylpropion should not be used for long-term weight management; tolerance to the anorectic effect of stimulants has been demonstrated. 

    Adolescents 16 years and older

    25 mg PO 3 times per day, taken 1 hour before meals. A 25 mg tablet may also be administered in the mid-evening if desired to overcome nighttime hunger. INTENDED USE: For patients with an initial body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m2 or more who have not responded to appropriate weight reducing regimen (diet and/or exercise) alone. According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology (AACE/ACE) Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines, short-term pharmacotherapy, such as with diethylpropion, has not been shown to produce longer-term health benefits in obese and overweight patients and cannot be generally recommended. Diethylpropion should not be used for long-term weight management; tolerance to the anorectic effect of stimulants has been demonstrated. 

    Oral dosage (extended-release tablets)
    Adults

    75 mg PO once daily in the mid-morning. INTENDED USE: For patients with an initial body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m2 or more who have not responded to appropriate weight reducing regimen (diet and/or exercise) alone. According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology (AACE/ACE) Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines, short-term pharmacotherapy, such as with diethylpropion, has not been shown to produce longer-term health benefits in obese and overweight patients and cannot be generally recommended. Diethylpropion should not be used for long-term weight management; tolerance to the anorectic effect of stimulants has been demonstrated.

    Adolescents 16 years and older

    75 mg PO once daily in the mid-morning. INTENDED USE: For patients with an initial body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m2 or more who have not responded to appropriate weight reducing regimen (diet and/or exercise) alone. According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology (AACE/ACE) Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines, short-term pharmacotherapy, such as with diethylpropion, has not been shown to produce longer-term health benefits in obese and overweight patients and cannot be generally recommended. Diethylpropion should not be used for long-term weight management; tolerance to the anorectic effect of stimulants has been demonstrated.

    MAXIMUM DOSAGE

    Adults

    75 mg/day PO.

    Geriatric

    75 mg/day PO.

    Adolescents

    16 to 17 years: 75 mg/day PO.
    Less than 16 years: Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    Children

    Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

    Hepatic Impairment

    The effects of hepatic impairment on diethylpropion and its metabolites (some of which are active) is unknown; use with caution in patients with hepatic impairment.

    Renal Impairment

    Diethylpropion and its metabolites (some of which are active) are substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of toxic reactions may be greater in patients with impaired renal function; however, specific dosage recommendations are not available.

    ADMINISTRATION

    Oral Administration
    Oral Solid Formulations

    Immediate-release Tablets: Immediate-release diethylpropion should be administered one hour before meals, and may also be administered in the mid-evening. 
     
    Sustained-release Tablets: Sustained-release diethylpropion should be administered in the mid-morning.

    STORAGE

    Depletite # 2 :
    - Avoid excessive heat (above 104 degrees F)
    - Store at 77 degrees F; excursions permitted to 59-86 degrees F
    Durad :
    - Store below 86 degrees F
    Radtue:
    - Avoid excessive heat (above 104 degrees F)
    - Store at 77 degrees F; excursions permitted to 59-86 degrees F
    Tenuate:
    - Avoid excessive heat (above 104 degrees F)
    - Store at 77 degrees F; excursions permitted to 59-86 degrees F
    Tenuate Dospan:
    - Store below 86 degrees F

    CONTRAINDICATIONS / PRECAUTIONS

    Anorexia nervosa

    Patients with anorexia nervosa should not receive anorexiants, since this could worsen the patient's nutritional status. Further, diethylpropion should not be prescribed to patients who have been treated with anorexiant drugs in the preceding 12 months.

    Arteriosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, valvular heart disease

    Due to its vasopressor effects, diethylpropion is contraindicated in patients with advanced arteriosclerosis, severe hypertension, or pulmonary hypertension. Diethylpropion is not recommended in patients with cardiac arrhythmias, heart murmur, or valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is associated with the use of some anorectic agents such as fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine. Cardiac valvulopathy has been very rarely reported with diethylpropion monotherapy, but the causal relationship remains uncertain. Possible contributing factors include use for extended periods of time, higher than recommended dose, and/or use in combination with other anorectic drugs. Baseline cardiac evaluation should be considered to detect preexisting valvular heart diseases or pulmonary hypertension prior to initiation of diethylpropion treatment. Echocardiogram during and after treatment could be useful for detecting any valvular disorders which may occur. In a case-control epidemiological study, the use of anorectic agents, including diethylpropion, was associated with an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension, a rare, but often fatal disorder. The use of anorectic agents for longer than 3 months was associated with a 23-fold increase in the risk of developing pulmonary hypertension.Increased risk of pulmonary hypertension with repeated courses of therapy cannot be excluded. The onset or aggravation of exertional dyspnea, or unexplained symptoms of angina pectoris, syncope, or lower extremity edema suggest the possibility of occurrence of pulmonary hypertension. Under these circumstances, diethylpropion should be immediately discontinued, and the patient should be evaluated for the possible presence of pulmonary hypertension. The potential risk of possible serious adverse effects such as valvular heart disease and pulmonary hypertension should be assessed carefully against the potential benefit of weight loss.

    Glaucoma

    Because diethylpropion is a sympathomimetic agent, its use is contraindicated in patients with glaucoma.

    MAOI therapy

    Diethylpropion is contraindicated in patients receiving MAOI therapy, or within 14 days following the administration of a MAOI since hypertensive crisis may occur.

    Hyperthyroidism, thyroid disease

    Diethylpropion is contraindicated in thyroid disease patients with hyperthyroidism, since sympathomimetic stimulation may induce cardiac arrhythmias or other side effects.

    Abrupt discontinuation, substance abuse

    Diethylpropion is contraindicated in patients with a history of substance abuse. Diethylpropion is chemically and pharmacologically related to the amphetamines, which have been extensively abused. Physiological dependence can occur with diethylpropion. Abrupt discontinuation of prolonged high dose diethylpropion therapy can result in extreme fatigue and mental depression as well as changes in sleep EEG. If tolerance develops, the recommended dose should not be exceeded in an attempt to increase the effect; rather, the drug should be discontinued.

    Mania, psychosis

    Diethylpropion is contraindicated in patients in an agitated state. Diethylpropion should be used cautiously in patients with psychosis or mania. Amphetamine-like agents have been shown to aggravate these conditions.

    Children, infants

    Safety and effectiveness of diethylpropion in children have not been established. Diethylpropion is not recommended for infants, children, and adolescents under 16 years of age.

    Seizure disorder

    Reports suggest that diethylpropion may increase the risk of seizures in some epileptic patients. Patients with a seizure disorder receiving diethylpropion should be closely monitored.

    Neonates, pregnancy

    Diethylpropion is contraindicated during pregnancy because weight loss offers no potential benefit to a pregnant woman and may result in fetal harm. A minimum weight gain and no weight loss is currently recommended for all pregnant women, including those who are already overweight or obese, due to obligatory weight gain that occurs in maternal tissues during pregnancy. Diethylpropion has pharmacologic activity similar to amphetamine. Abuse with diethylpropion hydrochloride during pregnancy may result in withdrawal symptoms in human neonates. Spontaneous reports of congenital malformation have been reported in humans, but no causal relationship to diethylpropion has been established. No adequate, well-controlled studies exist in pregnant women. Diethylpropion and its metabolites are thought to cross the placental barrier, but animal data reveal no harmful effects during pregnancy. Spontaneous reports of congenital malformation have been reported in humans, but no causal relationship to diethylpropion has been established.[29114]

    Breast-feeding

    Diethylpropion hydrochloride and its metabolites (some of which are active) have been shown to be excreted into breast milk. Because of the potential for adverse effects in the nursing infants, experts state that breast-feeding while taking anorectics such as diethylpropion should be avoided.

    Surgery

    The use of inhalational anesthetics during surgery may sensitize the myocardium to the effects of sympathomimetic drugs. Because of this, and its effects on blood pressure, diethylpropion should be discontinued several days prior to surgery.

    Geriatric, renal failure, renal impairment

    Adequate numbers of geriatric patients were not included in diethylpropion clinical trials to determine if their response would be different from younger patients, although differences have not been seen. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range due to potential decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, concomitant disease or other drug therapy. Diethylpropion is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney. Because elderly patients are more likely to have renal impairment or renal failure, care should be taken in dose selection and monitoring.

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Severe

    seizures / Delayed / 0-1.0
    torsade de pointes / Rapid / 0-1.0
    cardiac valvulopathy / Delayed / 0-1.0
    stroke / Early / 0-1.0
    bradycardia / Rapid / Incidence not known
    pulmonary hypertension / Delayed / Incidence not known
    rhabdomyolysis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    agranulocytosis / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Moderate

    psychological dependence / Delayed / 1.0-10.0
    physiological dependence / Delayed / 1.0-10.0
    hypertension / Early / 1.0-10.0
    psychosis / Early / 0-1.0
    withdrawal / Early / 0-1.0
    hallucinations / Early / 0-1.0
    tolerance / Delayed / 10.0
    constipation / Delayed / 10.0
    dyskinesia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    euphoria / Early / Incidence not known
    depression / Delayed / Incidence not known
    dysphoria / Early / Incidence not known
    sinus tachycardia / Rapid / Incidence not known
    palpitations / Early / Incidence not known
    angina / Early / Incidence not known
    dyspnea / Early / Incidence not known
    chest pain (unspecified) / Early / Incidence not known
    blurred vision / Early / Incidence not known
    hypotension / Rapid / Incidence not known
    delirium / Early / Incidence not known
    tachypnea / Early / Incidence not known
    dysuria / Early / Incidence not known
    impotence (erectile dysfunction) / Delayed / Incidence not known
    erythema / Early / Incidence not known
    leukopenia / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Mild

    dizziness / Early / 1.0-10.0
    restlessness / Early / 1.0-10.0
    tremor / Early / 1.0-10.0
    dysgeusia / Early / 1.0-10.0
    abdominal pain / Early / 1.0-10.0
    nausea / Early / 1.0-10.0
    vomiting / Early / 0-1.0
    diarrhea / Early / 0-1.0
    headache / Early / 10.0
    insomnia / Early / 10.0
    xerostomia / Early / 10.0
    drowsiness / Early / Incidence not known
    anxiety / Delayed / Incidence not known
    syncope / Early / Incidence not known
    mydriasis / Early / Incidence not known
    diaphoresis / Early / Incidence not known
    paranoia / Early / Incidence not known
    menstrual irregularity / Delayed / Incidence not known
    polyuria / Early / Incidence not known
    gynecomastia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    libido increase / Delayed / Incidence not known
    libido decrease / Delayed / Incidence not known
    urticaria / Rapid / Incidence not known
    rash / Early / Incidence not known
    alopecia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    ecchymosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hyperhidrosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    malaise / Early / Incidence not known
    myalgia / Early / Incidence not known

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Acarbose: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Acebutolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Acetaminophen; Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Magnesium Salicylate; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Phenyltoloxamine; Salicylamide: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine; Phenyltoloxamine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Acetaminophen; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Albiglutide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Albuterol: (Major) Caution and close observation should be used when albuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Albuterol; Ipratropium: (Major) Caution and close observation should be used when albuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Aliskiren; Amlodipine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Aliskiren; Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications. (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Aliskiren; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Alogliptin; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Alpha-blockers: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of alpha-blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Alpha-glucosidase Inhibitors: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Amantadine: (Moderate) Careful observation is required when amantadine is administered concurrently with central nervous system (CNS) stimulants. An increase in stimulant effects, such as nervousness, irritability, insomnia, tremor, seizures, or cardiac arrhythmias may occur.
    Ambrisentan: (Major) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of vasodilators when administered concomitantly. Patients should be monitored for reduced efficacy if taking ambrisentan with a sympathomimetic.
    Amifampridine: (Major) Carefully consider the need for concomitant treatment with diethylpropion and amifampridine, as coadministration may increase the risk of seizures. If coadministration occurs, closely monitor patients for seizure activity. Seizures have been observed in patients without a history of seizures taking amifampridine at recommended doses. Diethylpropion may increase the risk of seizures.
    Amiloride; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Amitriptyline: (Major) Avoid the use of these agents together. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) may potentiate the pressor response to sympathomimetic agents, such as diethylpropion. TCAs inhibit norepinephrine reuptake in adrenergic neurons, resulting in increased stimulation of adrenergic receptors. Clinically, the patient might experience side effects like hypertension, headache, tremor, palpitations, chest pain, or irregular heartbeat. Patients should be closely monitored if use together is unavoidable.
    Amitriptyline; Chlordiazepoxide: (Major) Avoid the use of these agents together. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) may potentiate the pressor response to sympathomimetic agents, such as diethylpropion. TCAs inhibit norepinephrine reuptake in adrenergic neurons, resulting in increased stimulation of adrenergic receptors. Clinically, the patient might experience side effects like hypertension, headache, tremor, palpitations, chest pain, or irregular heartbeat. Patients should be closely monitored if use together is unavoidable.
    Amlodipine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Amlodipine; Atorvastatin: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Amlodipine; Benazepril: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Olmesartan: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications. (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Valsartan: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications. (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Amlodipine; Olmesartan: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Amlodipine; Telmisartan: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Amlodipine; Valsartan: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Amoxapine: (Major) Concomitant use of amoxapine with sympathomimetics should be avoided whenever possible; use with caution when concurrent use cannot be avoided. One drug information reference suggests that cyclic antidepressants decrease the pressor response to indirect-acting sympathomimetics, such as diethylpropion, however, the data are not consistent.
    Angiotensin II receptor antagonists: (Moderate) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of angiotensin II receptor antagonists. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Arformoterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when arformoterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Orphenadrine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Atenolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Atenolol; Chlorthalidone: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications. (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Atomoxetine: (Major) Atomoxetine, an inhibitor of norepinephrine reuptake used for treatment of ADHD, has been shown to increase heart rate and blood pressure. Diethylpropion also inhibits norepinephrine reuptake. The combination of atomoxetine with diethylpropion should be used extremely cautiously, if at all, due to the potential for serious increases in blood pressure and/or heart rate. If these agents must be used concomitantly, consider monitoring blood pressure and heart rate at baseline and regularly throughout treatment.
    Azilsartan; Chlorthalidone: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Benazepril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Bendroflumethiazide; Nadolol: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications. (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Beta-blockers: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Betaxolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Bethanechol: (Moderate) Bethanechol offsets the effects of sympathomimetics at sites where sympathomimetic and cholinergic receptors have opposite effects.
    Bisoprolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Bisoprolol; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications. (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Bosentan: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with bosentan. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including bosentan. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Bretylium: (Major) The action of sympathomimetics may be enhanced in patients receiving bretylium. Increased sensitivity to sympathomimetics should be expected in patients receiving bretylium.
    Brimonidine; Timolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Bromocriptine: (Major) There is a risk of hypertension and seizures in patients receiving bromocriptine and sympathomimetics concomitantly. Until more data are available, the combination of a sympathomimetic and bromocriptine should be approached with caution and avoided whenever possible.
    Brompheniramine; Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Budesonide; Formoterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when formoterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Bupropion: (Major) Drugs which may lower the seizure threshold, such as diethylpropion, should be used with great caution or avoided in patients taking bupropion. The manufacturer recommends low initial dosing and slow dosage titration of bupropion if this combination must be used concurrently; the patient should be closely monitored.
    Bupropion; Naltrexone: (Major) Drugs which may lower the seizure threshold, such as diethylpropion, should be used with great caution or avoided in patients taking bupropion. The manufacturer recommends low initial dosing and slow dosage titration of bupropion if this combination must be used concurrently; the patient should be closely monitored.
    Cabergoline: (Major) Cardiac valvulopathy has occurred during treatment with cabergoline; therefore, cabergoline should be used cautiously in patients exposed to other medications associated with valvulopathy such as diethylpropion.
    Caffeine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Caffeine; Ergotamine: (Moderate) Caffeine is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants.
    Calcium-channel blockers: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Canagliflozin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Canagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Candesartan; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Captopril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Carbetapentane; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Carbetapentane; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Carbetapentane; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine; Pyrilamine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Carbinoxamine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Carbinoxamine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Cardiac glycosides: (Major) Concomitant use of cardiac glycosides with sympathomimetics can cause arrhythmias because sympathomimetics enhance ectopic pacemaker activity. Caution is warranted during co-administration of digoxin and sympathomimetics.
    Carteolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Carvedilol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Chlophedianol; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Chlorothiazide: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dihydrocodeine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Chlorpromazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Chlorthalidone: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Chlorthalidone; Clonidine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications. (Major) Sympathomimetics, such as diethylpropion, can antagonize the antihypertensive effects of clonidine when administered concomitantly. Patients should be monitored for loss of blood pressure control.
    Clevidipine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Clomipramine: (Major) Avoid the use of these agents together. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) may potentiate the pressor response to sympathomimetic agents, such as diethylpropion. TCAs inhibit norepinephrine reuptake in adrenergic neurons, resulting in increased stimulation of adrenergic receptors. Clinically, the patient might experience side effects like hypertension, headache, tremor, palpitations, chest pain, or irregular heartbeat. Patients should be closely monitored if use together is unavoidable.
    Clonidine: (Major) Sympathomimetics, such as diethylpropion, can antagonize the antihypertensive effects of clonidine when administered concomitantly. Patients should be monitored for loss of blood pressure control.
    Cocaine: (Severe) Additive effects and increased toxicity may be observed when using cocaine in combination with other sympathomimetics. The combined use of these agents may have the potential for additive adrenergic stimulation and side effects, such as CNS stimulation, hypertensive crisis, cardiac arrhythmias or ischemia (angina).
    Codeine; Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines. (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Codeine; Promethazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Colchicine: (Minor) The response to sympathomimetics may be enhanced by colchicine.
    Colchicine; Probenecid: (Minor) The response to sympathomimetics may be enhanced by colchicine.
    Dapagliflozin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Dapagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Dapagliflozin; Saxagliptin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Desipramine: (Major) Avoid the use of these agents together. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) may potentiate the pressor response to sympathomimetic agents, such as diethylpropion. TCAs inhibit norepinephrine reuptake in adrenergic neurons, resulting in increased stimulation of adrenergic receptors. Clinically, the patient might experience side effects like hypertension, headache, tremor, palpitations, chest pain, or irregular heartbeat. Patients should be closely monitored if use together is unavoidable.
    Dextromethorphan; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Dextromethorphan; Promethazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Digitoxin: (Major) Concomitant use of cardiac glycosides with sympathomimetics can cause arrhythmias because sympathomimetics enhance ectopic pacemaker activity. Caution is warranted during co-administration of digoxin and sympathomimetics.
    Digoxin: (Major) Concomitant use of cardiac glycosides with sympathomimetics can cause arrhythmias because sympathomimetics enhance ectopic pacemaker activity. Caution is warranted during co-administration of digoxin and sympathomimetics.
    Diltiazem: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Diphenhydramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Dopamine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Dorzolamide; Timolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Doxepin: (Major) Avoid the use of these agents together. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) may potentiate the pressor response to sympathomimetic agents, such as diethylpropion. TCAs inhibit norepinephrine reuptake in adrenergic neurons, resulting in increased stimulation of adrenergic receptors. Clinically, the patient might experience side effects like hypertension, headache, tremor, palpitations, chest pain, or irregular heartbeat. Patients should be closely monitored if use together is unavoidable.
    Dronabinol: (Moderate) Concurrent use of dronabinol, THC with sympathomimetics may result in additive hypertension, tachycardia, and possibly cardiotoxicity. Dronabinol, THC has been associated with occasional hypotension, hypertension, syncope, and tachycardia. In a study of 7 adult males, combinations of IV cocaine and smoked marijuana, 1 g marijuana cigarette, 0 to 2.7% delta-9-THC, increased the heart rate above levels seen with either agent alone, with increases plateauing at 50 bpm.
    Droxidopa: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Dulaglutide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Dyphylline: (Major) Coadministration of dyphylline with sympathomimetics should be approached with caution. Coadministration may lead to adverse effects, such as tremors, insomnia, seizures, or cardiac arrhythmias, and should be avoided if possible.
    Dyphylline; Guaifenesin: (Major) Coadministration of dyphylline with sympathomimetics should be approached with caution. Coadministration may lead to adverse effects, such as tremors, insomnia, seizures, or cardiac arrhythmias, and should be avoided if possible.
    Empagliflozin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Empagliflozin; Linagliptin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Empagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Enalapril; Felodipine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Enalapril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Enflurane: (Major) Halogenated anesthetics sensitize the myocardium to the effects of the sympathomimetics. Because of this, and its effects on blood pressure, diethylpropion should be discontinued several days prior to surgery.
    Ephedrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Eplerenone: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of eplerenone. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and eplerenone, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients taking eplerenone.
    Epoprostenol: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with epoprostenol. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including epoprostenol. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Eprosartan; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Ertugliflozin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Ertugliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Ertugliflozin; Sitagliptin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Esketamine: (Major) Closely monitor blood pressure during concomitant use of esketamine and diethylpropion. Coadministration of psychostimulants, such as diethylpropion, with esketamine may increase blood pressure, including the possibility of hypertensive crisis.
    Esmolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Exenatide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Felodipine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Fluoxetine: (Major) Phentermine and diethylpropion have a similar mechanism of action. When phentermine was given with fluoxetine, adrenergic excess and dyskinesia were observed. Thus, diethylpropion may interact with fluoxetine similarly. It is unclear, however, if all SSRIs would be affected as fluoxetine has the longest half-life of the group.
    Fluoxetine; Olanzapine: (Major) Phentermine and diethylpropion have a similar mechanism of action. When phentermine was given with fluoxetine, adrenergic excess and dyskinesia were observed. Thus, diethylpropion may interact with fluoxetine similarly. It is unclear, however, if all SSRIs would be affected as fluoxetine has the longest half-life of the group.
    Fluphenazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Fluticasone; Salmeterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should also be used when salmeterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Fluticasone; Umeclidinium; Vilanterol: (Moderate) Administer sympathomimetics with caution with beta-agonists such as vilanterol. The cardiovascular effects of beta-2 agonists may be potentiated by concomitant use. Monitor the patient for tremors, nervousness, increased heart rate, or other additive side effects.
    Fluticasone; Vilanterol: (Moderate) Administer sympathomimetics with caution with beta-agonists such as vilanterol. The cardiovascular effects of beta-2 agonists may be potentiated by concomitant use. Monitor the patient for tremors, nervousness, increased heart rate, or other additive side effects.
    Formoterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when formoterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Formoterol; Mometasone: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when formoterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Fosinopril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Glimepiride; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Glimepiride; Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Glycopyrrolate; Formoterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should be used when formoterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Green Tea: (Major) Some, but not all, green tea products contain caffeine. Caffeine should be avoided or used cautiously with diethylpropion. CNS stimulants and sympathomimetics are associated with adverse effects such as nervousness, irritability, insomnia, and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Guanabenz: (Major) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the antihypertensive effects of adrenergic agonists when administered concomitantly. Patients should be monitored for loss of blood pressure control.
    Guarana: (Major) Caffeine, an active constituent of guarana, is a CNS-stimulant and such actions are expected to be additive when coadministered with other CNS stimulants or psychostimulants. Use of guarana should be avoided with amphetamine, dextroamphetamine, methylphenidate, modafinil, pemoline, pseudoephedrine, beta-agonists or other sympathomimetics. When combined with any of these medications, nervousness, irritability, insomnia, and/or cardiac arrhythmias may result.
    Hydralazine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Irbesartan: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Lisinopril: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Losartan: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Methyldopa: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of antihypertensive agents particularly sympatholytic agents such as methyldopa. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications. (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Metoprolol: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications. (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Moexipril: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Olmesartan: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Propranolol: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications. (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Quinapril: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Spironolactone: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Telmisartan: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Triamterene: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Valsartan: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Iloprost: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with iloprost. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including iloprost. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Imipramine: (Major) Avoid the use of these agents together. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) may potentiate the pressor response to sympathomimetic agents, such as diethylpropion. TCAs inhibit norepinephrine reuptake in adrenergic neurons, resulting in increased stimulation of adrenergic receptors. Clinically, the patient might experience side effects like hypertension, headache, tremor, palpitations, chest pain, or irregular heartbeat. Patients should be closely monitored if use together is unavoidable.
    Incretin Mimetics: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Indacaterol: (Moderate) Administer sympathomimetics with caution with beta-agonists such as indacaterol. The cardiovascular effects of beta-2 agonists may be potentiated by concomitant use. Monitor the patient for tremors, nervousness, increased heart rate, or other additive side effects.
    Indacaterol; Glycopyrrolate: (Moderate) Administer sympathomimetics with caution with beta-agonists such as indacaterol. The cardiovascular effects of beta-2 agonists may be potentiated by concomitant use. Monitor the patient for tremors, nervousness, increased heart rate, or other additive side effects.
    Indapamide: (Major) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the antihypertensive effects of vasodilators when administered concomitantly. Patients should be monitored to confirm that the desired antihypertensive effect is achieved.
    Insulin Degludec; Liraglutide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Insulin Glargine; Lixisenatide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Insulins: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Iobenguane I 131: (Major) Discontinue sympathomimetics for at least 5 half-lives before the administration of the dosimetry dose or a therapeutic dose of iobenguane I-131. Do not restart sympathomimetics until at least 7 days after each iobenguane I-131 dose. Drugs that reduce catecholamine uptake or deplete catecholamine stores, such as sympathomimetics, may interfere with iobenguane I-131 uptake into cells and interfere with dosimetry calculations resulting in altered iobenguane I-131 efficacy.
    Isocarboxazid: (Severe) In general, all types of sympathomimetics and psychostimulants should be avoided in patients receiving MAOIs due to an increased risk of hypertensive crisis. This applies to sympathomimetics including stimulants for ADHD, narcolepsy or weight loss, nasal, oral, and ophthalmic decongestants and cold products, and even respiratory sympathomimetics (e.g., beta agonist drugs). Some local anesthetics also contain a sympathomimetic (e.g., epinephrine). In general, medicines containing sympathomimetic agents should not be used concurrently with MAOIs or within 14 days before or after their use.
    Isradipine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Labetalol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Levalbuterol: (Major) Caution and close observation should be used when albuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Levobetaxolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Levobunolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Levothyroxine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic amines should be used with caution in patients with thyrotoxicosis since these patients are unusually responsive to sympathomimetic amines. Based on the cardiovascular stimulatory effects of sympathomimetic drugs, the concomitant use of sympathomimetics and thyroid hormones can enhance the effects on the cardiovascular system. Patients with coronary artery disease have an increased risk of coronary insufficiency from either agent. Concomitant use of these agents may increase this risk further. In addition, dopamine at a dose of >= 1 mcg/kg/min and dopamine agonists (e.g., apomorphine, bromocriptine, levodopa, pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine) may result in a transient reduction in TSH secretion. The reduction in TSH secretion is not sustained; hypothyroidism does not occur.
    Levothyroxine; Liothyronine (Porcine): (Moderate) Sympathomimetic amines should be used with caution in patients with thyrotoxicosis since these patients are unusually responsive to sympathomimetic amines. Based on the cardiovascular stimulatory effects of sympathomimetic drugs, the concomitant use of sympathomimetics and thyroid hormones can enhance the effects on the cardiovascular system. Patients with coronary artery disease have an increased risk of coronary insufficiency from either agent. Concomitant use of these agents may increase this risk further. In addition, dopamine at a dose of >= 1 mcg/kg/min and dopamine agonists (e.g., apomorphine, bromocriptine, levodopa, pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine) may result in a transient reduction in TSH secretion. The reduction in TSH secretion is not sustained; hypothyroidism does not occur.
    Levothyroxine; Liothyronine (Synthetic): (Moderate) Sympathomimetic amines should be used with caution in patients with thyrotoxicosis since these patients are unusually responsive to sympathomimetic amines. Based on the cardiovascular stimulatory effects of sympathomimetic drugs, the concomitant use of sympathomimetics and thyroid hormones can enhance the effects on the cardiovascular system. Patients with coronary artery disease have an increased risk of coronary insufficiency from either agent. Concomitant use of these agents may increase this risk further. In addition, dopamine at a dose of >= 1 mcg/kg/min and dopamine agonists (e.g., apomorphine, bromocriptine, levodopa, pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine) may result in a transient reduction in TSH secretion. The reduction in TSH secretion is not sustained; hypothyroidism does not occur.
    Linezolid: (Major) Linezolid can prolong and intensify the cardiac stimulation and vasopressor effects of diethylpropion. Diethylpropion should not be administered during, or within 14 days following the use of MAOIs, or drugs with MAO-inhibiting activity.
    Liothyronine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic amines should be used with caution in patients with thyrotoxicosis since these patients are unusually responsive to sympathomimetic amines. Based on the cardiovascular stimulatory effects of sympathomimetic drugs, the concomitant use of sympathomimetics and thyroid hormones can enhance the effects on the cardiovascular system. Patients with coronary artery disease have an increased risk of coronary insufficiency from either agent. Concomitant use of these agents may increase this risk further. In addition, dopamine at a dose of >= 1 mcg/kg/min and dopamine agonists (e.g., apomorphine, bromocriptine, levodopa, pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine) may result in a transient reduction in TSH secretion. The reduction in TSH secretion is not sustained; hypothyroidism does not occur.
    Liraglutide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Lixisenatide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Loop diuretics: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of loop diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Macitentan: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with macitentan. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including macitentan. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Maprotiline: (Major) Sympathomimetics may interact with maprotiline, resulting in severe cardiovascular effects including arrhythmias, severe hypertension, hyperpyrexia, and/or severe headaches.
    Meglitinides: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Meperidine; Promethazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Mesoridazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Metaproterenol: (Major) Caution and close observation should also be used when metaproterenol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Metformin; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Metformin; Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Methyclothiazide: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Methyldopa: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of antihypertensive agents particularly sympatholytic agents such as methyldopa. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Metolazone: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Metoprolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Midodrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Miglitol: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors: (Severe) In general, all types of sympathomimetics and psychostimulants should be avoided in patients receiving MAOIs due to an increased risk of hypertensive crisis. This applies to sympathomimetics including stimulants for ADHD, narcolepsy or weight loss, nasal, oral, and ophthalmic decongestants and cold products, and even respiratory sympathomimetics (e.g., beta agonist drugs). Some local anesthetics also contain a sympathomimetic (e.g., epinephrine). In general, medicines containing sympathomimetic agents should not be used concurrently with MAOIs or within 14 days before or after their use.
    Nabilone: (Moderate) Concurrent use of nabilone with sympathomimetics (e.g., amphetamine or cocaine) may result in additive hypertension, tachycardia, and possibly cardiotoxicity. In a study of 7 adult males, combinations of cocaine (IV) and smoked marijuana (1 g marijuana cigarette, 0 to 2.7% delta-9-THC) increased the heart rate above levels seen with either agent alone, with increases reaching a plateau at 50 bpm.
    Nadolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Nebivolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Nebivolol; Valsartan: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Nicardipine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Nifedipine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Nimodipine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Nisoldipine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Nitrates: (Major) Concomitant use of nitrates with sympathomimetics can result in antagonism of the antianginal effects of nitrates. In addition, amyl nitrite can block the alpha-adrenergic effects of epinephrine, possibly precipitating tachycardia and severe hypotension.
    Non-Ionic Contrast Media: (Major) Use of medications that lower the seizure threshold, such as diethylpropion, should be carefully evaluated when considering non-ionic contrast media. Such medications should be discontinued at least 48 hours before myelography and should not be resumed for at least 24 hours postprocedure.
    Norepinephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Nortriptyline: (Major) Avoid the use of these agents together. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) may potentiate the pressor response to sympathomimetic agents, such as diethylpropion. TCAs inhibit norepinephrine reuptake in adrenergic neurons, resulting in increased stimulation of adrenergic receptors. Clinically, the patient might experience side effects like hypertension, headache, tremor, palpitations, chest pain, or irregular heartbeat. Patients should be closely monitored if use together is unavoidable.
    Penbutolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Perindopril; Amlodipine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Perphenazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Perphenazine; Amitriptyline: (Major) Avoid the use of these agents together. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) may potentiate the pressor response to sympathomimetic agents, such as diethylpropion. TCAs inhibit norepinephrine reuptake in adrenergic neurons, resulting in increased stimulation of adrenergic receptors. Clinically, the patient might experience side effects like hypertension, headache, tremor, palpitations, chest pain, or irregular heartbeat. Patients should be closely monitored if use together is unavoidable. (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Phenelzine: (Severe) In general, all types of sympathomimetics and psychostimulants should be avoided in patients receiving MAOIs due to an increased risk of hypertensive crisis. This applies to sympathomimetics including stimulants for ADHD, narcolepsy or weight loss, nasal, oral, and ophthalmic decongestants and cold products, and even respiratory sympathomimetics (e.g., beta agonist drugs). Some local anesthetics also contain a sympathomimetic (e.g., epinephrine). In general, medicines containing sympathomimetic agents should not be used concurrently with MAOIs or within 14 days before or after their use.
    Phenothiazines: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Phenylephrine: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines. (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Pindolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Pirbuterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should also be used when pirbuterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Pramlintide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Procarbazine: (Major) Because procarbazine exhibits some monoamine oxidase inhibitory (MAOI) activity, sympathomimetic drugs should be avoided. As with MAOIs, the use of a sympathomimetic drug with procarbazine may precipitate hypertensive crisis or other serious side effects. In the presence of MAOIs, drugs that cause release of norepinephrine induce severe cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses. In general, do not use a sympathomimetic drug unless clinically necessary (e.g., medical emergencies, agents like dopamine) within the 14 days prior, during or 14 days after procarbazine therapy. If use is necessary within 2 weeks of the MAOI drug, in general the initial dose of the sympathomimetic agent must be greatly reduced. Patients should be counseled to avoid non-prescription (OTC) decongestants and other drug products, weight loss products, and energy supplements that contain sympathomimetic agents.
    Prochlorperazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Promethazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Propranolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Protriptyline: (Major) Avoid the use of these agents together. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) may potentiate the pressor response to sympathomimetic agents, such as diethylpropion. TCAs inhibit norepinephrine reuptake in adrenergic neurons, resulting in increased stimulation of adrenergic receptors. Clinically, the patient might experience side effects like hypertension, headache, tremor, palpitations, chest pain, or irregular heartbeat. Patients should be closely monitored if use together is unavoidable.
    Rasagiline: (Moderate) The concomitant use of rasagiline and sympathomimetics was not allowed in clinical studies; therefore, caution is advised during concurrent use of rasagiline and sympathomimetics including stimulants for ADHD and weight loss, non-prescription nasal, oral, and ophthalmic decongestants, and weight loss dietary supplements containing Ephedra. Although sympathomimetics are contraindicated for use with other non-selective monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), hypertensive reactions generally are not expected to occur during concurrent use with rasagiline because of the selective monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibition of rasagiline at manufacturer recommended doses. One case of elevated blood pressure has been reported in a patient during concurrent use of the recommended dose of rasagiline and ophthalmic tetrahydrozoline. One case of hypertensive crisis has been reported in a patient taking the recommended dose of another MAO-B inhibitor, selegiline, in combination with ephedrine. It should be noted that the MAO-B selectivity of rasagiline decreases in a dose-related manner as increases are made above the recommended daily dose and interactions with sympathomimetics may be more likely to occur at these higher doses.
    Reserpine: (Major) Sympathomimetics can increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of reserpine. This represents a pharmacodynamic, and not a pharmacokinetic, interaction.
    Riociguat: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with riociguat. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including riociguat. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Safinamide: (Moderate) Severe hypertensive reactions, including hypertensive crisis, have been reported in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as safinamide, and sympathomimetic medications, such as diethylpropion. If concomitant use of safinamide and diethylpropion is necessary, monitor for hypertension and hypertensive crisis.
    Salmeterol: (Moderate) Caution and close observation should also be used when salmeterol is used concurrently with other adrenergic sympathomimetics, administered by any route, to avoid potential for increased cardiovascular effects.
    Selegiline: (Severe) In general, all types of sympathomimetics and psychostimulants should be avoided in patients receiving MAOIs due to an increased risk of hypertensive crisis. This applies to sympathomimetics including stimulants for ADHD, narcolepsy or weight loss, nasal, oral, and ophthalmic decongestants and cold products, and even respiratory sympathomimetics (e.g., beta agonist drugs). Some local anesthetics also contain a sympathomimetic (e.g., epinephrine). In general, medicines containing sympathomimetic agents should not be used concurrently with MAOIs or within 14 days before or after their use.
    Selexipag: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with selexipag. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including selexipag. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Semaglutide: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    SGLT2 Inhibitors: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Sibutramine: (Severe) Sibutramine is contraindicated in patients taking other centrally-acting appetite suppressant drugs, including diethylpropion.
    Solriamfetol: (Moderate) Monitor blood pressure and heart rate during coadministration of solriamfetol, a norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor, and diethylpropion, a CNS stimulant. Concurrent use of solriamfetol and other medications that increase blood pressure and/or heart rate may increase the risk of such effects. Coadministration of solriamfetol with other drugs that increase blood pressure or heart rate has not been evaluated.
    Sotalol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    St. John's Wort, Hypericum perforatum: (Major) St. John's wort, Hypericum Perforatum may reduce the neuronal uptake of monoamines and should be used cautiously with sympathomimetics.
    Sulfonylureas: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Terbutaline: (Major) Concomitant use of sympathomimetics with beta-agonists might result in additive cardiovascular effects such as increased blood pressure and heart rate.
    Theophylline, Aminophylline: (Moderate) Concurrent administration of theophylline or aminophylline with some sympathomimetics can produce excessive stimulation and effects such as nervousness, irritability, or insomnia. (Moderate) Concurrent administration of theophylline or aminophylline with some sympathomimetics can produce excessive stimulation and effects such as nervousness, irritability, or insomnia. Seizures or cardiac arrhythmias are also possible.
    Thiazide diuretics: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Thiazolidinediones: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Thiethylperazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Thioridazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Thyroid hormones: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic amines should be used with caution in patients with thyrotoxicosis since these patients are unusually responsive to sympathomimetic amines. Based on the cardiovascular stimulatory effects of sympathomimetic drugs, the concomitant use of sympathomimetics and thyroid hormones can enhance the effects on the cardiovascular system. Patients with coronary artery disease have an increased risk of coronary insufficiency from either agent. Concomitant use of these agents may increase this risk further. In addition, dopamine at a dose of >= 1 mcg/kg/min and dopamine agonists (e.g., apomorphine, bromocriptine, levodopa, pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine) may result in a transient reduction in TSH secretion. The reduction in TSH secretion is not sustained; hypothyroidism does not occur.
    Timolol: (Minor) Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed in patients receiving a beta-blocker. Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Concurrent use increases the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.
    Trandolapril; Verapamil: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Tranylcypromine: (Severe) In general, all types of sympathomimetics and psychostimulants should be avoided in patients receiving MAOIs due to an increased risk of hypertensive crisis. This applies to sympathomimetics including stimulants for ADHD, narcolepsy or weight loss, nasal, oral, and ophthalmic decongestants and cold products, and even respiratory sympathomimetics (e.g., beta agonist drugs). Some local anesthetics also contain a sympathomimetic (e.g., epinephrine). In general, medicines containing sympathomimetic agents should not be used concurrently with MAOIs or within 14 days before or after their use.
    Treprostinil: (Major) Avoid use of sympathomimetic agents with treprostinil. Sympathomimetics counteract the medications used to stabilize pulmonary hypertension, including treprostinil. Sympathomimetics can increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and may cause vasoconstriction resulting in chest pain and shortness of breath in these patients. Patients should be advised to avoid amphetamine drugs, decongestants (including nasal decongestants) and sympathomimetic anorexiants for weight loss, including dietary supplements. Intravenous vasopressors may be used in the emergency management of pulmonary hypertension patients when needed, but hemodynamic monitoring and careful monitoring of cardiac status are needed to avoid ischemia and other complications.
    Tricyclic antidepressants: (Major) Avoid the use of these agents together. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) may potentiate the pressor response to sympathomimetic agents, such as diethylpropion. TCAs inhibit norepinephrine reuptake in adrenergic neurons, resulting in increased stimulation of adrenergic receptors. Clinically, the patient might experience side effects like hypertension, headache, tremor, palpitations, chest pain, or irregular heartbeat. Patients should be closely monitored if use together is unavoidable.
    Trifluoperazine: (Major) Concurrent use of diethylpropion and phenothiazines may antagonize the anorectic effects of diethylpropion. In addition, diethylpropion can aggravate psychotic states and interfere with the therapeutic effect of phenothiazines.
    Trimipramine: (Major) Avoid the use of these agents together. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) may potentiate the pressor response to sympathomimetic agents, such as diethylpropion. TCAs inhibit norepinephrine reuptake in adrenergic neurons, resulting in increased stimulation of adrenergic receptors. Clinically, the patient might experience side effects like hypertension, headache, tremor, palpitations, chest pain, or irregular heartbeat. Patients should be closely monitored if use together is unavoidable.
    Umeclidinium; Vilanterol: (Moderate) Administer sympathomimetics with caution with beta-agonists such as vilanterol. The cardiovascular effects of beta-2 agonists may be potentiated by concomitant use. Monitor the patient for tremors, nervousness, increased heart rate, or other additive side effects.
    Vasodilators: (Major) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the antihypertensive effects of vasodilators when administered concomitantly. Also, vasodilators can antagonize pressor responses to epinephrine. Patients should be monitored to confirm that the desired antihypertensive effect is achieved.
    Vasopressors: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects. Coadministration with other vasopressors may have the potential for serious cardiac adverse effects such as hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrhythmias.
    Verapamil: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Yohimbine: (Major) At high doses, yohimbine may nonselectively inhibit monoamine oxidase and also, at normal doses, activates the sympathetic nervous system via selective central alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonism. Traditional MAOIs can cause serious adverse effects when taken concomitantly with sympathomimetics

    PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

    Pregnancy

    Diethylpropion hydrochloride and its metabolites (some of which are active) have been shown to be excreted into breast milk. Because of the potential for adverse effects in the nursing infants, experts state that breast-feeding while taking anorectics such as diethylpropion should be avoided.

    MECHANISM OF ACTION

    Diethylpropion is a sympathomimetic amine that possesses pharmacological properties similar to amphetamine. Although the exact mechanism of action has not been established, it is thought that appetite suppression is produced by a stimulant effect on the satiety center in the hypothalamic and limbic regions of the brain. Secondary actions include CNS stimulation and blood pressure elevation. Diethylpropion acts primarily on adrenergic pathways to increase the release of norepinephrine from nerve terminals and inhibit its reuptake; therefore, it is considered an indirect-acting sympathomimetic. There is evidence that diethylpropion may also provide some direct stimulation of the nerve terminal to produce the pharmacologic response.

    PHARMACOKINETICS

    Diethylpropion is administered orally. Diethylpropion is metabolized through a complex mechanism of N-dealkylation and reduction. N-dealkylation is thought to be responsible for metabolizing 45—55% of the dose whereas reduction accounts for 20—25% of the metabolic processes. Many of the diethylpropion metabolites are active. Diethylpropion and/or its metabolites are believed to cross the blood-brain-barrier and the placenta.
     
    Diethylpropion and its metabolites are excreted primarily by the kidneys. Within 48 hours after dosing, over 75% of the dose is recovered in the urine, 3—6% as unchanged drug, and 64—67% as metabolites. The plasma half-life of the diethylpropion metabolites is approximately 4—8 hours.

    Oral Route

    The 75 mg sustained-release tablet has more gradual release characteristics than three 25 mg tablets given in a single dose, based on studies of plasma levels obtained with each dosage form. Diethylpropion is rapidly absorbed from the GI tract.