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    Second Generation Sulfonylurea Antidiabetics

    DEA CLASS

    Rx

    DESCRIPTION

    'second-generation' sulfonylurea; shorter duration of action than glyburide; no active metabolites
    Used primarily in adults for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, as add-on therapy to metformin or other agents
    Glipizide is preferred over glyburide for use in the elderly and in patients with renal dysfunction

    COMMON BRAND NAMES

    Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL

    HOW SUPPLIED

    Glipizide/Glucotrol Oral Tab: 5mg, 10mg
    Glipizide/Glucotrol XL Oral Tab ER: 2.5mg, 5mg, 10mg

    DOSAGE & INDICATIONS

    For the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control.
    Oral dosage (regular-release tablets, e.g., Glucotrol)
    Adults

    Initially, 5 mg PO once daily given 30 minutes before breakfast. Geriatric patients or those patients at risk for hypoglycemia may be started on 2.5 mg/day. Dosage adjustments should be in increments of 2.5 to 5 mg. Several days should elapse between dosage adjustments. Usual maintenance dosage: 10 to 15 mg PO once daily. Max once daily dose: 15 mg PO once daily. Some patients not responding to once daily dosing may have better response with twice daily dosing. Daily doses more than 30 mg/day should be divided into 2 doses. Max: 40 mg/day, given in divided doses. SWITCHING FROM INSULIN: Some patients treated with insulin can be switched successfully to glipizide therapy. For patients being treated with less than 20 units of insulin per day, the usual starting dose of glipizide may be used. For patients being treated with more than 20 units of insulin per day, the manufacturer recommends that the daily insulin dose be decreased 50% and glipizide be initiated with usual doses. Monitor blood glucose and other appropriate parameters 3 times daily or as indicated. Subsequent reductions in insulin dosage should depend on individual patient response. Several days should elapse between glipizide titration steps. In some cases, especially when patient has been receiving greater than 40 units of insulin daily, it may be advisable to consider hospitalization during the transition period.

    Oral dosage (extended-release tablets, e.g., Glucotrol XL)
    Adults

    Initially, 5 mg PO once daily given with breakfast. Initiate at 2.5 mg/day in geriatric patients or those at risk for hypoglycemia. Dosage adjustment can be made based on the patient's glycemic control. Several days should elapse between dosage adjustments. Some patients may require 20 mg PO once daily. Max: 20 mg/day PO. SWITCHING FROM IMMEDIATE-RELEASE: Patients receiving the regular release glipizide product may be switched to the XL product once daily at the nearest equivalent total daily dose, not to exceed 20 mg/day PO.

    MAXIMUM DOSAGE

    Adults

    20 mg/day PO for extended-release tablets (e.g., Glucotrol XL); 40 mg/day PO for regular-release glipizide tablets (e.g., Glucotrol).

    Geriatric

    20 mg/day PO for extended-release tablets (e.g., Glucotrol XL); 40 mg/day PO for regular-release glipizide tablets (e.g., Glucotrol).

    Adolescents

    Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    Children

    Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    Infants

    Not indicated.

    DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

    Hepatic Impairment

    2.5 mg PO once daily is the initial recommended dosage, regardless of product selection. The dosage should then be titrated to achieve clinical goals.

    Renal Impairment

    No specific dosage adjustment is needed; however, because patients with renal impairment may be predisposed to hypoglycemic reactions, the manufacturer recommends conservative initial and maintenance glipizide doses as well as careful blood glucose monitoring.

    ADMINISTRATION

    NOTE: Oral hypoglycemic dosage should be individualized and periodic monitoring of blood glucose is necessary to determine the lowest effective dose.
    NOTE: Special care needs to be taken if transferring patient from chlorpropamide to glipizide therapy. Since chlorpropamide's effects can persist for 1—2 weeks following the discontinuation of therapy, hypoglycemia can result from additive effects of the 2 agents. The normal starting dose of glipizide may be used when transferring patients from other sulfonylureas.
     
    For storage information, see specific product information within the How Supplied section.

    Oral Administration
    Oral Solid Formulations

    The regular-release formulation should generally be given 30 minutes before a meal to ensure maximum reduction in postprandial hyperglycemia.
    The extended-release formulation should be given with breakfast.

    STORAGE

    Glucotrol:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Glucotrol XL:
    - Avoid excessive humidity
    - Protect from moisture
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)

    CONTRAINDICATIONS / PRECAUTIONS

    General Information

    There are conflicting studies regarding the possible cardiovascular risks associated with the use of oral sulfonylurea antidiabetic agents like glipizide. The largest of the trials, the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS), has demonstrated that intensive therapy with sulfonylureas does not increase the risk of myocardial infarction or diabetes-related death when compared to conventional therapy. In this trial, lowering blood glucose with sulfonylurea therapy did not significantly effect cardiovascular complications. A 16% reduction (not statistically significant) in the risk of combined fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction and sudden death has been reported. In a follow-up study to the UKPDS, researchers found that after 10-years of resuming typical care, patients originally randomized to intensive therapy with sulfonylureas or insulin had a 15% relative reduction (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.74—0.97; p=0.01) in the risk of myocardial infarction and a 13% relative decrease (RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.76—0.96; p=0.007) in the risk of death from any cause as compared to patients originally randomized to conventional therapy; it should be noted that these reductions in cardiovascular risks persisted even though HbA1c concentrations were similar in the 2 groups after 1 year of follow-up. In contrast, the University Group Diabetes Program (UGDP) has previously reported that the administration of oral sulfonylureas increases cardiovascular mortality compared with dietary management alone, or dietary management and insulin therapy. The UGDP study has been widely criticized for study limitations including a small sample size (i.e., 200 patients per treatment group). Despite the controversy regarding these findings, the results of the UGDP study serve as a basis for the manufacturers' warning of possible risk of cardiovascular mortality associated with the use of oral sulfonylureas.

    Sulfonylurea hypersensitivity

    Glipizide is contraindicated in patients with a glipizide hypersensitivity; it should be used with caution in patients with a known sulfonylurea hypersensitivity.

    Sulfonamide hypersensitivity

    It may be prudent to monitor patients with a known history of sulfonamide hypersensitivity for allergic-type reactions when initiating glipizide; some products are labeled as contraindicated in patients with a history of hypersensitivity to sulfonamide derivatives. Not every patient may need to avoid glipizide treatment. Patients with a history of sulfonamide hypersensitivity should be monitored for hypersensitivity reactions to other drugs, including sulfonylureas; however, treatment with a nonantibiotic sulfonamide may not need to be withheld in patients with a sulfonamide allergy as long as patients are monitored appropriately, especially if alternative therapies are not available. Although they contain a sulfonamide side chain, sulfonylureas and other nonantibiotic sulfonamides do not contain the N4 aromatic amine or the N1-substituent that are present in sulfonamide antibiotics and thought to be responsible for hypersensitivity-type adverse reactions; the risk of cross-sensitivity in patients taking a nonantibiotic sulfonamide that have a history of sulfonamide hypersensitivity is low and has been confirmed by recent, observational studies. However, several cases in the literature report of cross-sensitivity reactions to sulfonylureas in patients with a history of sulfonamide hypersensitivity. A 57 year-old man with a self-reported sulfonamide allergy (unknown offending agent) and stable on hydrochlorothiazide and glyburide experienced possible erythema multiforme, an acute inflammatory skin reaction, and throat swelling within 30 days after initiating celecoxib, which contains a sulfonamide side chain. Although the skin reaction resolved with celecoxib discontinuation, a similar reaction occurred when glyburide and hydrochlorothiazide therapies were re-introduced. In another case report, a 71 year-old man with multiple, documented drug allergies including Stevens-Johnson syndrome to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole experienced a rash after receiving furosemide and after receiving glyburide, both of which contain a sulfonamide side chain. It should be noted that this patient also had a history of several non-sulfonamide allergies; he subsequently received torsemide, which also contains a sulfonamide side chain, without problems. In general, patients with a history of hypersensitivity to any drug are predisposed for subsequent hypersensitivity reactions to other drugs.

    Diabetic ketoacidosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Glipizide is contraindicated in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) with or without coma, which requires treatment with insulin. The drug should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Burns, fever, infection, surgery, trauma

    Temporary use of insulin in place of oral agents may be necessary during periods of physiologic stress (e.g., burns, systemic infection, trauma, surgery, or fever) in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents. Stress can induce alterations in glucose regulation that can be controlled only with exogenously administered insulin.

    Adrenal insufficiency, diarrhea, GI obstruction, hypercortisolism, hyperglycemia, hyperthyroidism, hypoglycemia, hypothyroidism, ileus, malnutrition, pituitary insufficiency, vomiting

    Delayed stomach emptying may alter blood glucose control; monitor patients with diarrhea, gastroparesis, GI obstruction, ileus, or vomiting carefully. In addition, conditions that predispose patients to developing hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia may alter antidiabetic agent efficacy. Conditions associated with hypoglycemia include debilitated physical condition, drug interactions, malnutrition, uncontrolled adrenal insufficiency, pituitary insufficiency, or hypothyroidism. Hyperglycemia related conditions include drug interactions, female hormonal changes, high fever, severe psychological stress, and uncontrolled hypercortisolism or hyperthyroidism. More frequent blood glucose monitoring may be necessary in patients taking glipizide who have these conditions.

    Hepatic disease, porphyria, renal failure, renal impairment

    Hepatic disease and insufficiency may increase drug levels of glipizide and may also diminish gluconeogenic capacity, both of which increase the risk of hypoglycemic reactions. Lower initial doses of glipizide are generally recommended in patients with hepatic disease. Careful blood glucose monitoring may help to avoid hypoglycemic reactions. Sulfonylureas can exacerbate hepatic porphyria and should be used cautiously in patients with a history of this condition. The metabolism and excretion of glipizide may be slowed in patients with renal impairment and renal failure. Initial dosing should be conservative, especially if CrCl is 50 mL/min or less. If hypoglycemia should occur in such patients, it may be prolonged and appropriate management should be instituted.

    G6PD deficiency, hemolytic anemia

    Sulfonylurea agents, including glipizide, can cause hemolytic anemia in patients with glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Use glipizide with caution in patients with G6PD deficiency and consider the use of a non-sulfonylurea oral antidiabetic agent. There are also reports of hemolytic anemia in patients receiving sulfonylureas who did not have known G6PD deficiency. Consider regular measurement of hematologic parameters in patients taking glipizide.

    Geriatric

    Geriatric patients may be more susceptible to the hypoglycemic effects of glipizide. Older, debilitated or malnourished patients are particularly susceptible to the hypoglycemic action of glucose-lowering drugs. Hypoglycemia may be difficult to recognize in the geriatric patient. It may be helpful to assess renal function to help guide dose selection, since age related renal decline may occur. Use conservative initial and maintenance doses of the drug. The federal Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) regulates medication use in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). According to OBRA, the use of antidiabetic medications should include monitoring (e.g., periodic blood glucose) for effectiveness based on desired goals for that individual and to identify complications of treatment such as hypoglycemia or impaired renal function. In addition, sulfonylureas can cause SIADH and result in hyponatremia.

    Neonates, obstetric delivery, pregnancy

    Available data from a small number of published studies and postmarketing experience with glipizide use in human pregnancy over decades have not identified any drug associated risks for major birth defects, miscarriage, or adverse maternal outcomes. However, animal reproduction studies have shown adverse fetal effects, and glipizide is not recommended for use during pregnancy due to the long-action of the drug; the potential benefits to the pregnant mother must be weighed against the potential risks to the fetus. Sulfonylureas cross the placenta and prolonged severe hypoglycemia has been reported in neonates born to mothers who were receiving a sulfonylurea at the time of obstetric delivery. Therefore, if glipizide is continued during pregnancy, it should be discontinued at least 1 month prior to the expected obstetric delivery date; extended-release glipizide should be discontinued at least 2 weeks before expected delivery.[50976] [50977] Neonates of women with gestational diabetes who are treated with sulfonylureas during pregnancy may be at increased risk for neonatal intensive care admission and may develop respiratory distress, hypoglycemia, birth injury, and be large for gestational age. Observe newborns for symptoms of hypoglycemia and respiratory distress and manage accordingly.[50977] The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) continue to recommend human insulin as the standard of care in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) requiring medical therapy; insulin does not cross the placenta.[60607] [62358]

    Breast-feeding

    Glipizide was not detected in the breast milk of 2 postpartum, breast-feeding women receiving 5 mg/day of glipizide; furthermore, and importantly, neither infant experienced hypoglycemia. This small study suggests that breast-feeding in women taking glipizide may be safe, but more data are needed before glipizide's use can be routinely recommended due the limited data.[31568] The manufacturer of glipizide continues to recommend that glipizide not be used in women who are breast-feeding. If the drug is discontinued and blood glucose is not controlled on diet and exercise alone, insulin therapy should be considered.[46720] Tolbutamide is usually regarded as compatible with breast-feeding.[27500] Glyburide may be a suitable alternative since it was not detected in the breast milk of lactating women who received single and multiple doses of glyburide.[31568] Other oral hypoglycemics may be considered as possible alternatives during breast-feeding. Because acarbose has limited systemic absorption, which results in minimal maternal plasma concentrations, clinically significant exposure via breast milk is not expected.[46303] Metformin monotherapy may also be a consideration; data have shown that metformin is excreted into breast milk in small amounts and adverse effects on infant plasma glucose have not been reported in human studies.[31407] [31408] [31409] If any oral hypoglycemics are used during breast feeding, the nursing infant should be monitored for signs of hypoglycemia, such as increased fussiness or somnolence.[46104]

    Children

    Safe and effective use of glipizide has not been established in children and adolescents under the age of 18 years. Experience with the use of oral hypoglycemics is limited in pediatric patients.

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Severe

    secondary failure / Delayed / 21.8-46.8
    hepatic failure / Delayed / 0-0.1
    angioedema / Rapid / 0-0.1
    vasculitis / Delayed / 0-0.1
    aplastic anemia / Delayed / 0-0.1
    pancytopenia / Delayed / 0-0.1
    agranulocytosis / Delayed / 0-0.1
    SIADH / Delayed / 0-0.1
    GI bleeding / Delayed / Incidence not known
    porphyria / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Moderate

    hypoglycemia / Early / 1.8-39.0
    blurred vision / Early / 0-3.0
    constipation / Delayed / 1.0-2.9
    atopic dermatitis / Delayed / 1.4-1.4
    hepatitis / Delayed / 0-1.0
    cholestasis / Delayed / 0-1.0
    elevated hepatic enzymes / Delayed / 0-1.0
    jaundice / Delayed / 0-1.0
    hypertonia / Delayed / 0-1.0
    confusion / Early / 0-1.0
    thrombocytopenia / Delayed / 0-0.1
    leukopenia / Delayed / 0-0.1
    hemolysis / Early / 0-0.1
    hyponatremia / Delayed / 0-0.1
    gastritis / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Mild

    headache / Early / 2.0-8.6
    dizziness / Early / 2.0-6.8
    diarrhea / Early / 1.4-5.4
    tremor / Early / 0-3.6
    flatulence / Early / 0-3.2
    vomiting / Early / 0-3.0
    hyperhidrosis / Delayed / 0-3.0
    paresthesias / Delayed / 0-3.0
    hypoesthesia / Delayed / 0-3.0
    insomnia / Early / 0-3.0
    anxiety / Delayed / 0-3.0
    nausea / Early / 1.4-2.9
    dyspepsia / Early / 1.0-2.9
    pruritus / Rapid / 1.4-2.9
    drowsiness / Early / 2.0-2.0
    maculopapular rash / Early / 1.4-1.4
    urticaria / Rapid / 0-1.4
    anorexia / Delayed / 0-1.0
    pyrosis (heartburn) / Early / 0-1.0
    rash / Early / 0-1.0
    libido decrease / Delayed / 0-1.0
    vertigo / Early / 0-1.0
    myalgia / Early / 0-0.1
    arthralgia / Delayed / 0-0.1
    flushing / Rapid / 0-0.1
    weight gain / Delayed / 10.0
    abdominal pain / Early / Incidence not known
    photosensitivity / Delayed / Incidence not known

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Acebutolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Acetaminophen; Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Magnesium Salicylate; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Acetaminophen; Dichloralphenazone; Isometheptene: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Acetaminophen; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Acetaminophen; Propoxyphene: (Moderate) Propoxyphene may enhance the hypoglycemic action of antidiabetic agents. Patients should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control while receiving propoxyphene in combination with antidiabetic agents.
    Acetaminophen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Acitretin: (Moderate) Retinoids have been reported to cause changes in blood sugar control in diabetics. In a study of 7 healthy male volunteers, acitretin treatment potentiated the blood glucose lowering effect of glibenclamide (a sulfonylurea similar to chlorpropamide) in 3 of the 7 subjects. Repeating the study with 6 healthy male volunteers in the absence of glibenclamide did not detect an effect of acitretin on glucose tolerance. Careful supervision of diabetic patients under treatment with acitretin is recommended, especially those taking concomitant sulfonylureas. There appears to be no pharmacokinetic interaction between acitretin and glyburide.
    Acrivastine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Aliskiren; Valsartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Alogliptin; Metformin: (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Aluminum Hydroxide: (Moderate) Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing its hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH. If these drugs must be used together, give glipizide at least 2 hours prior to the antacid. Consider closely monitoring blood glucose concentrations.
    Aluminum Hydroxide; Magnesium Carbonate: (Moderate) Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing its hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH. If these drugs must be used together, give glipizide at least 2 hours prior to the antacid. Consider closely monitoring blood glucose concentrations.
    Aluminum Hydroxide; Magnesium Hydroxide: (Moderate) Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing its hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH. If these drugs must be used together, give glipizide at least 2 hours prior to the antacid. Consider closely monitoring blood glucose concentrations.
    Aluminum Hydroxide; Magnesium Hydroxide; Simethicone: (Moderate) Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing its hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH. If these drugs must be used together, give glipizide at least 2 hours prior to the antacid. Consider closely monitoring blood glucose concentrations.
    Aluminum Hydroxide; Magnesium Trisilicate: (Moderate) Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing its hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH. If these drugs must be used together, give glipizide at least 2 hours prior to the antacid. Consider closely monitoring blood glucose concentrations.
    Aminolevulinic Acid: (Moderate) Additive photosensitization may be seen with concurrent administration of sulfonylureas and other photosensitizing agents. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin
    Amiodarone: (Minor) Amiodarone inhibits cytochrome P450 2C9. Caution is recommended when administering amiodarone with other CYP2C9 substrates including sulfonylureas.
    Amlodipine; Benazepril: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Olmesartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Valsartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Amlodipine; Olmesartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Amlodipine; Telmisartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Amlodipine; Valsartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Amoxicillin; Clarithromycin; Lansoprazole: (Moderate) The concomitant use of clarithromycin and antidiabetic agents can result in significant hypoglycemia. Careful monitoring of blood glucose is recommended.
    Amoxicillin; Clarithromycin; Omeprazole: (Moderate) The concomitant use of clarithromycin and antidiabetic agents can result in significant hypoglycemia. Careful monitoring of blood glucose is recommended.
    Amphetamine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Amphetamine; Dextroamphetamine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Amprenavir: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Androgens: (Moderate) Changes in insulin sensitivity or glycemic control may occur in patients treated with androgens. In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, may decrease antidiabetic agent dosage requirements. Moniitor blood glucose and HbA1C when these drugs are used together.
    Angiotensin II receptor antagonists: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Antacids: (Moderate) Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing its hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH. If these drugs must be used together, give glipizide at least 2 hours prior to the antacid. Consider closely monitoring blood glucose concentrations.
    Aprepitant, Fosaprepitant: (Minor) Use caution if glipizide and aprepitant are used concurrently and monitor for a possible decrease in the efficacy of glipizide. After administration, fosaprepitant is rapidly converted to aprepitant and shares the same drug interactions. Glipizide is a CYP2C9 substrate and aprepitant is a CYP2C9 inducer. Administration of a CYP2C9 substrate, tolbutamide, on days 1, 4, 8, and 15 with a 3-day regimen of oral aprepitant (125 mg/80 mg/80 mg) decreased the tolbutamide AUC by 23% on day 4, 28% on day 8, and 15% on day 15. The AUC of tolbutamide was decreased by 8% on day 2, 16% on day 4, 15% on day 8, and 10% on day 15 when given prior to oral administration of aprepitant 40 mg on day 1, and on days 2, 4, 8, and 15. The effects of aprepitant on tolbutamide were not considered significant. When a 3-day regimen of aprepitant (125 mg/80 mg/80 mg) given to healthy patients on stabilized chronic warfarin therapy (another CYP2C9 substrate), a 34% decrease in S-warfarin trough concentrations was noted, accompanied by a 14% decrease in the INR at five days after completion of aprepitant.
    Aripiprazole: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition.
    Articaine; Epinephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Asenapine: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition.
    Aspirin, ASA: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Orphenadrine: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Aspirin, ASA; Carisoprodol: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Aspirin, ASA; Carisoprodol; Codeine: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Aspirin, ASA; Citric Acid; Sodium Bicarbonate: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria. (Moderate) Monitor blood glucose concentrations closely during coadministration of glipizide and sodium bicarbonate. Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing its hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH.
    Aspirin, ASA; Dipyridamole: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Aspirin, ASA; Omeprazole: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Aspirin, ASA; Oxycodone: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Aspirin, ASA; Pravastatin: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Atazanavir: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Atazanavir; Cobicistat: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Atenolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Atenolol; Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    atypical antipsychotic: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition.
    Azilsartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Azilsartan; Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Benazepril: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Benazepril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Bendroflumethiazide; Nadolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Benzphetamine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Beta-blockers: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Betaxolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Bexarotene: (Moderate) Systemic bexarotene may enhance the action of agents that enhance insulin secretion (e.g., sulfonylureas) resulting in hypoglycemia. Patients should be closely monitored while receiving bexarotene capsules in combination with any of these agents; monitor for hypoglycemia and the need for diabetic therapy adjustments. Hypoglycemia has not been associated with bexarotene monotherapy.
    Bismuth Subcitrate Potassium; Metronidazole; Tetracycline: (Moderate) Additive photosensitization may be seen with concurrent administration of sulfonylureas and other photosensitizing agents including tetracyclines. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin.
    Bismuth Subsalicylate: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Bismuth Subsalicylate; Metronidazole; Tetracycline: (Moderate) Additive photosensitization may be seen with concurrent administration of sulfonylureas and other photosensitizing agents including tetracyclines. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin. (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Bisoprolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Bisoprolol; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Bortezomib: (Moderate) During clinical trials of bortezomib, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia were reported in diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic agents. Patients taking antidiabetic agents and receiving bortezomib treatment may require close monitoring of their blood glucose levels and dosage adjustment of their medication.
    Bosentan: (Moderate) Bosentan is an inducer of CYP2C9 and is expected to reduce plasma concentrations of oral antidiabetic agents that are predominantly metabolized by CYP2C9 enzymes, such as glipizide; blood glucose monitoring is prudent following addition of bosentan therapy to such antidiabetic drugs.
    Brexpiprazole: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition.
    Brimonidine; Timolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Brompheniramine; Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Brompheniramine; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Brompheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Bumetanide: (Minor) Bumetanide has been associated with hyperglycemia, possibly due to potassium depletion, and, glycosuria has been reported. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between bumetanide and all antidiabetic agents. This interference can lead to a loss of diabetic control, so diabetic patients should be monitored closely.
    Calcium Carbonate: (Moderate) Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing their hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH. Consider closely monitoring blood glucose concentrations.
    Calcium Carbonate; Magnesium Hydroxide: (Moderate) Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing its hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH. If these drugs must be used together, give glipizide at least 2 hours prior to the antacid. Consider closely monitoring blood glucose concentrations. (Moderate) Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing their hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH. Consider closely monitoring blood glucose concentrations.
    Calcium Carbonate; Risedronate: (Moderate) Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing their hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH. Consider closely monitoring blood glucose concentrations.
    Calcium Carbonate; Simethicone: (Moderate) Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing their hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH. Consider closely monitoring blood glucose concentrations.
    Canagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Candesartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Candesartan; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Cannabidiol: (Moderate) Consider a dose reduction of glipizide as clinically appropriate, if adverse reactions occur when administered with cannabidiol. Increased glipizide exposure is possible. Glipizide is a CYP2C9 substrate. In vitro data predicts inhibition of CYP2C9 by cannabidiol potentially resulting in clinically significant interactions.
    Captopril: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Captopril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Carbetapentane; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Carbetapentane; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Carbetapentane; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine; Pyrilamine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Carbetapentane; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Carbinoxamine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Carbinoxamine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Carbinoxamine; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Carbinoxamine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Carbinoxamine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: (Minor) Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors may alter blood sugar. Both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia have been described in patients treated with acetazolamide. This should be taken into consideration in patients with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus who are receiving antidiabetic agents. Monitor blood glucose and for changes in glycemic control and be alert for evidence of an interaction.
    Cariprazine: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition.
    Carteolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Carvedilol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Cetirizine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Chlophedianol; Dexchlorpheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Chlophedianol; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Chloramphenicol: (Moderate) Clinical hypoglycemia may be observed when chloramphenicol is used in combination with sulfonylureas. If chloramphenicol is administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral sulfonylureas, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. Chloramphenicol may inhibit the hepatic metabolism of sulfonylureas. In addition, the hypoglycemic action of glyburide and glipizide may be potentiated by other drugs that are highly protein bound, such as chloramphenicol.
    Chloroquine: (Major) Careful monitoring of blood glucose is recommended when chloroquine and antidiabetic agents, including the sulfonylureas, are coadministered. A decreased dose of the antidiabetic agent may be necessary as severe hypoglycemia has been reported in patients treated concomitantly with chloroquine and an antidiabetic agent.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dihydrocodeine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dihydrocodeine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Chlorpheniramine; Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Chlorpheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Chlorthalidone; Clonidine: (Minor) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when clonidine is given with antidiabetic agents. Since clonidine inhibits the release of catecholamines, clonidine may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Clonidine does not appear to impair recovery from hypoglycemia, and has not been found to impair glucose tolerance in diabetic patients.
    Cholestyramine: (Moderate) Cholestyramine has been shown to reduce the bioavailability of glipizide, but appears to have no effect on tolbutamide absorption. The effect of cholestyramine on the bioavailability of other oral sulfonylureas is unknown.
    Choline Salicylate; Magnesium Salicylate: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Chromium: (Moderate) Chromium dietary supplements may lower blood glucose. As part of the glucose tolerance factor molecule, chromium appears to facilitate the binding of insulin to insulin receptors in tissues and to aid in glucose metabolism. Because blood glucose may be lowered by the use of chromium, patients who are on antidiabetic agents may need dose adjustments. Close monitoring of blood glucose is recommended.
    Cimetidine: (Moderate) Cimetidine has been shown to affect the pharmacokinetics of some oral sulfonylureas. Patients receiving sulfonylureas should be observed for evidence of altered glycemic response when cimetidine is instituted or discontinued. The mechanism of this interaction may involve either increasing the absorption or decreasing the clearance of the sulfonylurea. Asymptomatic hypoglycemia has been observed as a result of this interaction. It is unclear at this time if famotidine or nizatidine interact with oral sulfonylureas.
    Cisapride: (Moderate) Because cisapride can enhance gastric emptying in diabetic patients, blood glucose can be affected, which, in turn, may affect the clinical response to antidiabetic agents. Monitor blood glucose and adjust if cliniically indicated.
    Clarithromycin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of clarithromycin and antidiabetic agents can result in significant hypoglycemia. Careful monitoring of blood glucose is recommended.
    Clindamycin; Tretinoin: (Moderate) A manufacturer of topical tretinoin states that tretinoin, ATRA should be administered with caution in patients who are also taking drugs known to be photosensitizers, such as sulfonylureas, as concomitant use may augment phototoxicity. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure of treated areas.
    Clonidine: (Minor) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when clonidine is given with antidiabetic agents. Since clonidine inhibits the release of catecholamines, clonidine may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Clonidine does not appear to impair recovery from hypoglycemia, and has not been found to impair glucose tolerance in diabetic patients.
    Clozapine: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition.
    Codeine; Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Colchicine; Probenecid: (Moderate) Probenecid is highly protein bound, and the hypoglycemic effect of sulfonylureas made be potentiated if these drugs are coadministered.
    Colesevelam: (Moderate) Colesevelam reduces the oral bioavailability of glyburide, glipizide, glimepiride and other sulfonylureas. Administer these drugs at least 4 hours before colesevelam to limit this interaction. Drug response, including glycemic control, should also be monitored. Additionally, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus receiving sulfonylureas, colesevelam increased serum triglyceride concentrations by 18% compared to placebo (p less than 0.001). Monitor patients taking these treatments together for an increase in triglyceride concentrations. Discontinue colesevelam if triglyceride concentrations are more than 500 mg/dL or if hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis occurs.
    Conjugated Estrogens: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Conjugated Estrogens; Bazedoxifene: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Conjugated Estrogens; Medroxyprogesterone: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Corticosteroids: (Moderate) Monitor patients receiving antidiabetic agents closely for worsening glycemic control when corticosteroids are instituted and for signs of hypoglycemia when corticosteroids are discontinued. Systemic and inhaled corticosteroids are known to increase blood glucose and worsen glycemic control in patients taking antidiabetic agents. The main risk factors for impaired glucose tolerance due to corticosteroids are the dose of steroid and duration of treatment. Corticosteroids stimulate hepatic glucose production and inhibit peripheral glucose uptake into muscle and fatty tissues, producing insulin resistance. Decreased insulin production may occur in the pancreas due to a direct effect on pancreatic beta cells.
    Cyclosporine: (Moderate) Sulfonylureas may increase concentrations of cyclosporine. Retrospective data from 6 adults with post-renal transplant diabetes mellitus and normal hepatic and renal function before and after glyburide initiation were examined. The mean plasma cyclosporine concentration from 5 months of data before glyburide use was 212.3 +/- 66.4 ng/ml. In contrast, the mean plasma cyclosporine concentration from 5 months of data during glyburide use was 334.8 +/- 65.8 ng/ml. Until more data are available, when glyburide is added to cyclosporine therapy, monitor cyclosporine concentrations and adjust cyclosporine dosage as necessary. Also, monitor patients for increased cyclosporine toxicity (renal dysfunction, neurotoxicity). In addition, cyclosporine has been reported to cause hyperglycemia. Cyclosporine may have direct beta-cell toxicity, the effects of which may be dose-related. Patients should be monitored for worsening of glycemic control if cyclosporine is initiated in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Daclatasvir: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood glucose levels if daclatasvir is administered with antidiabetic agents. Dose adjustments of the antidiabetic agents may be needed. Altered blood glucose control, resulting in serious symptomatic hypoglycemia, has been reported in diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic agents in combination with direct acting antivirals, such as daclatasvir.
    Danazol: (Moderate) Changes in insulin sensitivity or glycemic control may occur in patients treated with androgens. In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, may decrease antidiabetic agent dosage requirements. Moniitor blood glucose and HbA1C when these drugs are used together.
    Dapagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Darunavir: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Darunavir; Cobicistat: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Darunavir; Cobicistat; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir alafenamide: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Dasabuvir; Ombitasvir; Paritaprevir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Demeclocycline: (Moderate) Additive photosensitization may be seen with concurrent administration of sulfonylureas and other photosensitizing agents including tetracyclines. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin.
    Desloratadine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Dexchlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Dexmethylphenidate: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Dextroamphetamine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Dextromethorphan; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Diazoxide: (Minor) Diazoxide, when administered intravenously or orally, produces a prompt dose-related increase in blood glucose level, due primarily to an inhibition of insulin release from the pancreas, and also to an extrapancreatic effect. The hyperglycemic effect begins within an hour and generally lasts no more than 8 hours in the presence of normal renal function. The hyperglycemic effect of diazoxide is expected to be antagonized by certain antidiabetic agents (e.g., insulin or a sulfonylurea). Blood glucose should be closely monitored.
    Dienogest; Estradiol valerate: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Diethylpropion: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Diethylstilbestrol, DES: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Dihydrocodeine; Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Diphenhydramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Disopyramide: (Moderate) Disopyramide may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents. Patients receiving disopyramide concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Dobutamine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Dopamine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Dorzolamide; Timolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Doxycycline: (Moderate) Additive photosensitization may be seen with concurrent administration of sulfonylureas and other photosensitizing agents including tetracyclines. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin.
    Drospirenone; Estradiol: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Drospirenone; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Drospirenone; Ethinyl Estradiol; Levomefolate: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Elexacaftor; tezacaftor; ivacaftor: (Minor) Increased monitoring is recommended if ivacaftor is administered concurrently with CYP2C9 substrates, such as glipizide. In vitro studies showed ivacaftor to be a weak inhibitor of CYP2C9. Co-administration may lead to increased exposure to CYP2C9 substrates; however, the clinical impact of this has not yet been determined.
    Elvitegravir: (Minor) Plasma concentrations of glipizide may be decreased when administered concurrently with elvitegravir. Patients may experience a decreased hypoglycemic effect when these drugs are coadministered. Elvitegravir is a CYP2C9 inducer, while glipizide is a CYP2C9 substrate.
    Elvitegravir; Cobicistat; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir Alafenamide: (Minor) Plasma concentrations of glipizide may be decreased when administered concurrently with elvitegravir. Patients may experience a decreased hypoglycemic effect when these drugs are coadministered. Elvitegravir is a CYP2C9 inducer, while glipizide is a CYP2C9 substrate.
    Elvitegravir; Cobicistat; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate: (Minor) Plasma concentrations of glipizide may be decreased when administered concurrently with elvitegravir. Patients may experience a decreased hypoglycemic effect when these drugs are coadministered. Elvitegravir is a CYP2C9 inducer, while glipizide is a CYP2C9 substrate.
    Empagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Enalapril, Enalaprilat: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Enalapril; Felodipine: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Enalapril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Ephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Epinephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Eprosartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Eprosartan; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Eravacycline: (Moderate) Use sulfonylureas and eravacycline together with caution; the risk of severe burns/photosensitivity may be additive. If concurrent use is necessary, closely monitor patients for signs or symptoms of skin toxicity. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin.
    Ertugliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Esmolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Esterified Estrogens: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Esterified Estrogens; Methyltestosterone: (Moderate) Changes in insulin sensitivity or glycemic control may occur in patients treated with androgens. In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, may decrease antidiabetic agent dosage requirements. Moniitor blood glucose and HbA1C when these drugs are used together. (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Estradiol Cypionate; Medroxyprogesterone: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Estradiol: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Estradiol; Levonorgestrel: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Estradiol; Norethindrone: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Estradiol; Norgestimate: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Estradiol; Progesterone: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Estrogens: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Estropipate: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethanol: (Moderate) Patients should be advised to limit alcohol (ethanol) ingestion when treated with a sulfonylurea. Ethanol inhibits gluconeogenesis, which can contribute to or increase the risk for hypoglycemia. In some patients taking sulfonylureas, hypoglycemia can be prolonged. If a patient with diabetes ingests alcohol, they should be counselled to to avoid ingestion of alcohol on an empty stomach, which increases risk for low blood sugar. Patients should also be aware of the carbohydrate intake provided by certain types of alcohol in the diet, which can contribute to poor glycemic control. If a patient chooses to ingest alcohol, they should monitor their blood glucose frequently. Many non-prescription drug products may be formulated with alcohol; instruct patients to scrutinize product labels prior to consumption. Rare reports of a disulfiram-like reaction have also been reported with some sulfonylureas.
    Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Desogestrel: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Ethynodiol Diacetate: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Etonogestrel: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Levonorgestrel: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Levonorgestrel; Ferrous bisglycinate: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Levonorgestrel; Folic Acid; Levomefolate: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norelgestromin: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norethindrone Acetate: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norethindrone Acetate; Ferrous fumarate: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norethindrone: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norethindrone; Ferrous fumarate: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norgestimate: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norgestrel: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Ethotoin: (Minor) Phenytoin and other hydantoins have the potential to increase blood glucose and thus interact with antidiabetic agents pharmacodynamically. In addition, coadministration may result in decreased serum concentrations of chlorpropamide. Monitor blood glucose for changes in glycemic control. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients.
    Exenatide: (Moderate) The risk of hypoglycemia is increased when exenatide is used in combination with insulins or insulin secretagogues such as the sulfonylureas. Although specific dose recommendations are not available, a lower dose of the insulin or secretagogue may be required to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia in this setting. Adequate blood glucose monitoring should be continued and followed.
    Fenofibrate: (Moderate) Dose reductions and increased frequency of glucose monitoring may be required when antidiabetic agents are administered with fibric acid derivatives (e.g., clofibrate, fenofibric acid, fenofibrate, gemfibrozil). Fibric acid derivatives may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents through increased insulin sensitivity and increased glucagon secretion.
    Fenofibric Acid: (Moderate) Dose reductions and increased frequency of glucose monitoring may be required when antidiabetic agents are administered with fibric acid derivatives (e.g., clofibrate, fenofibric acid, fenofibrate, gemfibrozil). Fibric acid derivatives may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents through increased insulin sensitivity and increased glucagon secretion.
    Fexofenadine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Fluconazole: (Moderate) A potential interaction between fluconazole and glipizide may lead to hypoglycemia that can sometimes be severe. The most likely mechanism for this interaction is inhibition of the CYP450 metabolism of glipizide by fluconazole. For example, the combination of fluconazole and glipizide has resulted in significant increases in the AUCs (roughly 49% or more) and Cmax (roughly 20%) of glipizide in healthy volunteers; however, individual patients may have greater or lesser changes in these pharmacokinetic parameters. Blood glucose concentrations should be monitored during concomitant treatment with these systemic azole antifungals; patients should be aware of the symptoms of hypoglycemia. In some cases, dosage adjustment of the sulfonylurea may be necessary. There is no evidence that an interaction occurs between oral hypoglycemics and topical or vaginal azole antifungal preparations.
    Fluocinolone; Hydroquinone; Tretinoin: (Moderate) A manufacturer of topical tretinoin states that tretinoin, ATRA should be administered with caution in patients who are also taking drugs known to be photosensitizers, such as sulfonylureas, as concomitant use may augment phototoxicity. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure of treated areas.
    Fluoxetine: (Moderate) In patients with diabetes mellitus, fluoxetine may alter glycemic control. Hypoglycemia has occurred during fluoxetine therapy. Hyperglycemia has developed in patients with diabetes mellitus following discontinuation of the drug. The dosage of insulin and/or other antidiabetic agents may need to be adjusted when therapy with fluoxetine is instituted or discontinued.
    Fluoxetine; Olanzapine: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition. (Moderate) In patients with diabetes mellitus, fluoxetine may alter glycemic control. Hypoglycemia has occurred during fluoxetine therapy. Hyperglycemia has developed in patients with diabetes mellitus following discontinuation of the drug. The dosage of insulin and/or other antidiabetic agents may need to be adjusted when therapy with fluoxetine is instituted or discontinued.
    Fluoxymesterone: (Moderate) Changes in insulin sensitivity or glycemic control may occur in patients treated with androgens. In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, may decrease antidiabetic agent dosage requirements. Moniitor blood glucose and HbA1C when these drugs are used together.
    Fosamprenavir: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Fosinopril: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Fosinopril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Fosphenytoin: (Minor) Phenytoin and other hydantoins have the potential to increase blood glucose and thus interact with antidiabetic agents pharmacodynamically. In addition, coadministration may result in decreased serum concentrations of chlorpropamide. Monitor blood glucose for changes in glycemic control. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients.
    Furosemide: (Minor) Furosemide may cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria in patients with diabetes mellitus. This interference can lead to a loss of diabetic control, so diabetic patients should be monitored closely.
    Garlic, Allium sativum: (Moderate) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should use dietary supplements of Garlic, Allium sativum with caution. Constituents in garlic might have some antidiabetic activity, and may increase serum insulin levels and increase glycogen storage in the liver. Monitor blood glucose and glycemic control. Patients with diabetes should inform their health care professionals of their intent to ingest garlic dietary supplements. Some patients may require adjustment to their hypoglycemic medications over time. One study stated that additional garlic supplementation (0.05 to 1.5 grams PO per day) contributed to improved blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus within 1 to 2 weeks, and had positive effects on total cholesterol and high/low density lipoprotein regulation over time. It is unclear if hemoglobin A1C is improved or if improvements are sustained with continued treatment beyond 24 weeks. Other reviews suggest that garlic may provide modest improvements in blood lipids, but few studies demonstrate decreases in blood glucose in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. More controlled trials are needed to discern if garlic has an effect on blood glucose in patients with diabetes. When garlic is used in foods or as a seasoning, or at doses of 50 mg/day or less, it is unlikely that blood glucose levels are affected to any clinically significant degree.
    Gemfibrozil: (Moderate) There is an increased risk for hypoglycemia when gemfibrozil is used with sulfonylureas. Dose reductions and increased frequency of glucose monitoring may be required. Gemfibrozil is a potent inhibitor of CYP2C9, which metabolizes many of the sulfonylureas. In addition, glyburide is a substrate of the OATP1B1 transporter and gemfibrozil inhibits OATP1B1. Due to the effects of gemfibrozil on sulfonylurea metabolic pathways, an increase in sulfonylurea exposure may occur. Fibric acid derivatives may also enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents through increased insulin sensitivity and increased glucagon secretion.
    Glecaprevir; Pibrentasvir: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood glucose levels if glecaprevir is administered with antidiabetic agents. Dose adjustments of the antidiabetic agents may be needed. Altered blood glucose control, resulting in serious symptomatic hypoglycemia, has been reported in diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic agents in combination with direct acting antivirals, such as glecaprevir. (Moderate) Closely monitor blood glucose levels if pibrentasvir is administered with antidiabetic agents. Dose adjustments of the antidiabetic agents may be needed. Altered blood glucose control, resulting in serious symptomatic hypoglycemia, has been reported in diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic agents in combination with direct acting antivirals, such as pibrentasvir.
    Glimepiride; Rosiglitazone: (Major) A maximum dose of 8 mg/day of rosiglitazone is recommended when used in combination with sulfonylureas; the incidence of adverse effects including hypoglycemia is increased with larger doses. In one clinical study, rosiglitazone 4 or 8 mg/day was added to failed glimepiride plus metformin therapy. The incidence of hypoglycemia (blood glucose concentrations <= 50 mg/dl) was 18.6% in the 4 mg/day group compared with 28% in the 8 mg/day group. In addition, 4 or 8 mg/day of rosiglitazone has been added to failed glyburide plus metformin therapy. The incidence of hypoglycemia was higher in the rosiglitazone (average dose 7.4 mg/day)+glyburide+metformin group (22%) when compared to the glyburide+metformin group (3%). Patients should be instructed to monitor blood glucose concentrations more frequently. Dosage adjustments may be indicated.
    Glipizide; Metformin: (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Glyburide; Metformin: (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Green Tea: (Moderate) Green tea catechins have been shown to decrease serum glucose concentrations in vitro. Patients with diabetes mellitus taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored closely for hypoglycemia if consuming green tea products.
    Griseofulvin: (Moderate) Additive photosensitization may be seen with concurrent administration of sulfonylureas and other photosensitizing agents including griseofulvin. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin.
    Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Halobetasol; Tazarotene: (Moderate) The manufacturer states that tazarotene should be administered with caution in patients who are also taking drugs known to be photosensitizers, such as sulfonylureas, as concomitant use may augment phototoxicity. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure of treated areas.
    Hydantoins: (Minor) Phenytoin and other hydantoins have the potential to increase blood glucose and thus interact with antidiabetic agents pharmacodynamically. In addition, coadministration may result in decreased serum concentrations of chlorpropamide. Monitor blood glucose for changes in glycemic control. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Irbesartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Lisinopril: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Losartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Metoprolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Moexipril: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Olmesartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Propranolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Quinapril: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Telmisartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Triamterene: (Minor) Triamterene can interfere with the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents. This can lead to a loss of diabetic control, so diabetic patients should be monitored closely.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Valsartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Hydrocodone; Potassium Guaiacolsulfonate; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Hydroxychloroquine: (Moderate) Careful monitoring of blood glucose is recommended when hydroxychloroquine and antidiabetic agents, including sulfonylureas, are coadministered. A decreased dose of the antidiabetic agent may be necessary as severe hypoglycemia has been reported in patients treated concomitantly with hydroxychloroquine and an antidiabetic agent.
    Ibuprofen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Iloperidone: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition.
    Indapamide: (Moderate) A potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between indapamide and antidiabetic agents, like sulfonylureas. Indapamide can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia.
    Indinavir: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Insulin Glargine; Lixisenatide: (Moderate) The risk of hypoglycemia is increased when lixisenatide is used in combination with insulin secretagogues such as the sulfonylureas. Although specific dose recommendations are not available, a lower dose of the sulfonylurea may be required to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia in this setting. Adequate blood glucose monitoring should be continued and followed.
    Irbesartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Isocarboxazid: (Moderate) Animal data indicate that monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAO inhibitors) may stimulate insulin secretion. Inhibitors of MAO type A have been shown to prolong the hypoglycemic response to insulin and oral sulfonylureas. Serum glucose should be monitored closely when MAOI-type medications, including the selective MAO-B inhibitor selegiline, are added to any regimen containing antidiabetic agents.Although at low doses selegiline is selective for MAO type B, in doses above 30 to 40 mg/day, this selectivity is lost.
    Isoproterenol: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Itraconazole: (Moderate) Itraconazole should be used cautiously with oral antidiabetic agents like sulfonylureas. The combination of itraconazole and oral antidiabetic agents has resulted in severe hypoglycemia. Blood glucose concentrations should be monitored and possible dose adjustments of hypoglycemics may need to be made.
    Ivacaftor: (Minor) Increased monitoring is recommended if ivacaftor is administered concurrently with CYP2C9 substrates, such as glipizide. In vitro studies showed ivacaftor to be a weak inhibitor of CYP2C9. Co-administration may lead to increased exposure to CYP2C9 substrates; however, the clinical impact of this has not yet been determined.
    Ketoconazole: (Moderate) Hypoglycemia, sometimes severe, has been reported when ketoconazole is coadministered with oral hypoglycemic agents. The most likely mechanism for this interaction is inhibition of the CYP450 metabolism of oral hypoglycemics by ketoconazole. Blood glucose concentrations should be monitored during concomitant treatment; patients should be aware of the symptoms of hypoglycemia. In some cases, dosage adjustment of the sulfonylurea may be necessary. There is no evidence that an interaction occurs between oral hypoglycemics and topical or vaginal azole antifungal preparations.
    Labetalol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Lanreotide: (Moderate) Monitor blood glucose levels regularly in patients with diabetes, especially when lanreotide treatment is initiated or when the dose is altered. Adjust treatment with antidiabetic agents as clinically indicated. Lanreotide inhibits the secretion of insulin and glucagon. Patients treated with lanreotide may experience either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia.
    Ledipasvir; Sofosbuvir: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood glucose levels if ledipasvir is administered with antidiabetic agents. Dose adjustments of the antidiabetic agent(s) may be needed. Altered blood glucose control, resulting in serious symptomatic hypoglycemia, has been reported in diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic agents in combination with direct acting antivirals, such as ledipasvir. (Moderate) Closely monitor blood glucose levels if sofosbuvir is administered with antidiabetic agents. Dose adjustments of the antidiabetic agents may be needed. Altered blood glucose control, resulting in serious symptomatic hypoglycemia, has been reported in diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic agents in combination with direct acting antivirals, such as sofosbuvir.
    Levobetaxolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Levobunolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Linagliptin; Metformin: (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Linezolid: (Moderate) Hypoglycemia, including symptomatic episodes, has been noted in post-marketing reports with linezolid in patients with diabetes mellitus receiving therapy with antidiabetic agents, such as insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents. Diabetic patients should be monitored for potential hypoglycemic reactions while on linezolid. If hypoglycemia occurs, discontinue or decrease the dose of the antidiabetic agent or discontinue the linezolid therapy. Linezolid is a reversible, nonselective MAO inhibitor and other MAO inhibitors have been associated with hypoglycemic episodes in diabetic patients receiving insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents.
    Lisdexamfetamine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Lisinopril: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Lithium: (Moderate) Lithium may cause variable effects on glycemic control when used in patients receiving antidiabetic agents. Monitor blood glucose concentrations closely if lithium is coadministered with antidiabetic agents. Dosage adjustments of antidiabetic agents may be necessary.
    Lixisenatide: (Moderate) The risk of hypoglycemia is increased when lixisenatide is used in combination with insulin secretagogues such as the sulfonylureas. Although specific dose recommendations are not available, a lower dose of the sulfonylurea may be required to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia in this setting. Adequate blood glucose monitoring should be continued and followed.
    Lomefloxacin: (Moderate) Disturbances of blood glucose, including hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, have been reported in patients treated concomitantly with quinolones and an antidiabetic agent. Rare cases of severe hypoglycemia have been reported with concomitant use of quinolones and glyburide. Therefore, careful monitoring of blood glucose is recommended when quinolones and antidiabetic agents are coadministered. Monitor blood glucose when quinolones and antidiabetic agents are coadministered.
    Lopinavir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Loratadine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Lorcaserin: (Moderate) In general, weight reduction may increase the risk of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with antidiabetic agents, such as insulin and/or insulin secretagogues (e.g., sulfonylureas). In clinical trials, lorcaserin use was associated with reports of hypoglycemia. Blood glucose monitoring is warranted in patients with type 2 diabetes prior to starting and during lorcaserin treatment. Dosage adjustments of anti-diabetic medications should be considered. If a patient develops hypoglycemia during treatment, adjust anti-diabetic drug regimen accordingly. Of note, lorcaserin has not been studied in combination with insulin.
    Losartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Lovastatin; Niacin: (Moderate) Niacin (nicotinic acid) interferes with glucose metabolism and can result in hyperglycemia. Changes in glycemic control can usually be corrected through modification of hypoglycemic therapy. Monitor patients taking antidiabetic agents for changes in glycemic control if niacin (nicotinic acid) is added or deleted to the medication regimen. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Lumacaftor; Ivacaftor: (Moderate) Lumacaftor; ivacaftor may reduce the efficacy of glipizide by decreasing glipizide's systemic exposure. If used together, monitor blood glucose concentrations closely; the antidiabetic agent may require a dosage adjustment to obtain the desired therapeutic effect. Glipizide is a CYP2C9 substrate; in vitro studies suggest lumacaftor; ivacaftor has the potential to induce and inhibit CYP2C9. Of note, the metabolism of metformin is not affected. (Minor) Increased monitoring is recommended if ivacaftor is administered concurrently with CYP2C9 substrates, such as glipizide. In vitro studies showed ivacaftor to be a weak inhibitor of CYP2C9. Co-administration may lead to increased exposure to CYP2C9 substrates; however, the clinical impact of this has not yet been determined.
    Lumacaftor; Ivacaftor: (Moderate) Lumacaftor; ivacaftor may reduce the efficacy of glipizide by decreasing glipizide's systemic exposure. If used together, monitor blood glucose concentrations closely; the antidiabetic agent may require a dosage adjustment to obtain the desired therapeutic effect. Glipizide is a CYP2C9 substrate; in vitro studies suggest lumacaftor; ivacaftor has the potential to induce and inhibit CYP2C9. Of note, the metabolism of metformin is not affected.
    Lurasidone: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition.
    Magnesium Hydroxide: (Moderate) Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing its hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH. If these drugs must be used together, give glipizide at least 2 hours prior to the antacid. Consider closely monitoring blood glucose concentrations.
    Magnesium Salicylate: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Mecasermin rinfabate: (Moderate) Use caution in combining mecasermin, recombinant, rh-IGF-1 or mecasermin rinfabate (rh-IGF-1/rh-IGFBP-3) with antidiabetic agents. Patients should be advised to eat within 20 minutes of mecasermin administration. Glucose monitoring is important when initializing or adjusting mecasermin therapies, when adjusting concomitant antidiabetic therapy, and in the event of hypoglycemic symptoms. An increased risk for hypoglycemia is possible. The hypoglycemic effect induced by IGF-1 activity may be exacerbated. The amino acid sequence of mecasermin (rh-IGF-1) is approximately 50 percent homologous to insulin and cross binding with either receptor is possible. Treatment with mecasermin has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and to improve glycemic control in patients with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus when used alone or in conjunction with insulins.
    Mecasermin, Recombinant, rh-IGF-1: (Moderate) Use caution in combining mecasermin, recombinant, rh-IGF-1 or mecasermin rinfabate (rh-IGF-1/rh-IGFBP-3) with antidiabetic agents. Patients should be advised to eat within 20 minutes of mecasermin administration. Glucose monitoring is important when initializing or adjusting mecasermin therapies, when adjusting concomitant antidiabetic therapy, and in the event of hypoglycemic symptoms. An increased risk for hypoglycemia is possible. The hypoglycemic effect induced by IGF-1 activity may be exacerbated. The amino acid sequence of mecasermin (rh-IGF-1) is approximately 50 percent homologous to insulin and cross binding with either receptor is possible. Treatment with mecasermin has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and to improve glycemic control in patients with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus when used alone or in conjunction with insulins.
    Mepivacaine; Levonordefrin: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Mequinol; Tretinoin: (Moderate) A manufacturer of topical tretinoin states that tretinoin, ATRA should be administered with caution in patients who are also taking drugs known to be photosensitizers, such as sulfonylureas, as concomitant use may augment phototoxicity. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure of treated areas.
    Mestranol; Norethindrone: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Metformin: (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Metformin; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Metformin; Repaglinide: (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Metformin; Rosiglitazone: (Major) A maximum dose of 8 mg/day of rosiglitazone is recommended when used in combination with sulfonylureas; the incidence of adverse effects including hypoglycemia is increased with larger doses. In one clinical study, rosiglitazone 4 or 8 mg/day was added to failed glimepiride plus metformin therapy. The incidence of hypoglycemia (blood glucose concentrations <= 50 mg/dl) was 18.6% in the 4 mg/day group compared with 28% in the 8 mg/day group. In addition, 4 or 8 mg/day of rosiglitazone has been added to failed glyburide plus metformin therapy. The incidence of hypoglycemia was higher in the rosiglitazone (average dose 7.4 mg/day)+glyburide+metformin group (22%) when compared to the glyburide+metformin group (3%). Patients should be instructed to monitor blood glucose concentrations more frequently. Dosage adjustments may be indicated. (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Metformin; Saxagliptin: (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Metformin; Sitagliptin: (Moderate) Use of metformin with a sulfonylurea may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas are known to cause hypoglycemia. To manage hypoglycemic risk, lower doses of the sulfonylurea may be needed. Monitor blood sugar.
    Methamphetamine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Methotrexate: (Major) Methotrexate is partially bound to plasma proteins, and drugs that can displace methotrexate from these proteins, such as oral sulfonylureas could cause methotrexate-induced toxicity. Due to the potential toxicity of methotrexate, interactions with sulfonylureas can be very serious even if methotrexate is administered in low doses such as in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.
    Methoxsalen: (Moderate) Additive photosensitization may be seen with concurrent administration of sulfonylureas and other photosensitizing agents.
    Methylphenidate: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Methyltestosterone: (Moderate) Changes in insulin sensitivity or glycemic control may occur in patients treated with androgens. In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, may decrease antidiabetic agent dosage requirements. Moniitor blood glucose and HbA1C when these drugs are used together.
    Metoprolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Metreleptin: (Moderate) Use caution when administering metreleptin to patients treated with concomitant insulins or insulin secretagogue therapy (i.e., sulfonylureas, nateglinide, repaglinide). In clinical evaluation of metreleptin, hypoglycemia occurred in 13% of patients with generalized lipodystrophy. Most reported cases occurred with concomitant insulin use, with or without oral antihyperglycemic agents. Closely monitor blood glucose in patients on concomitant insulin or insulin secretagogue therapy. Dosage adjustments to their antihyperglycemic medications may be necessary.
    Metyrapone: (Moderate) In patients taking insulin or other antidiabetic agents, the signs and symptoms of acute metyrapone toxicity (e.g., symptoms of acute adrenal insufficiency) may be aggravated or modified.
    Miconazole: (Moderate) Hypoglycemia, sometimes severe, has been reported when systemic azole antifungals are coadministered with sulfonylureas. No formal drug interaction studies have been performed with buccal miconazole. Miconazole is a known inhibitor of CYP2C9. Although the systemic absorption of miconazole following buccal administration is minimal and plasma concentrations are substantially lower than when miconazole is given intravenously, the potential for interaction with drugs metabolized through CYP2C9 (such as the sulfonylureas) cannot be ruled out.
    Midodrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Minocycline: (Moderate) Additive photosensitization may be seen with concurrent administration of sulfonylureas and other photosensitizing agents including tetracyclines. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin.
    Moexipril: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors: (Moderate) Animal data indicate that monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAO inhibitors) may stimulate insulin secretion. Inhibitors of MAO type A have been shown to prolong the hypoglycemic response to insulin and oral sulfonylureas. Serum glucose should be monitored closely when MAOI-type medications, including the selective MAO-B inhibitor selegiline, are added to any regimen containing antidiabetic agents.Although at low doses selegiline is selective for MAO type B, in doses above 30 to 40 mg/day, this selectivity is lost.
    Nadolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Nandrolone Decanoate: (Moderate) Changes in insulin sensitivity or glycemic control may occur in patients treated with androgens. In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, may decrease antidiabetic agent dosage requirements. Moniitor blood glucose and HbA1C when these drugs are used together.
    Naproxen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Nebivolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Nebivolol; Valsartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Nelfinavir: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Niacin, Niacinamide: (Moderate) Niacin (nicotinic acid) interferes with glucose metabolism and can result in hyperglycemia. Changes in glycemic control can usually be corrected through modification of hypoglycemic therapy. Monitor patients taking antidiabetic agents for changes in glycemic control if niacin (nicotinic acid) is added or deleted to the medication regimen. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Niacin; Simvastatin: (Moderate) Niacin (nicotinic acid) interferes with glucose metabolism and can result in hyperglycemia. Changes in glycemic control can usually be corrected through modification of hypoglycemic therapy. Monitor patients taking antidiabetic agents for changes in glycemic control if niacin (nicotinic acid) is added or deleted to the medication regimen. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Nicotine: (Minor) Nicotine may increase plasma glucose. The cessation of nicotine therapy may result in a decrease in blood glucose. Blood glucose concentrations should be monitored more closely whenever a change in nicotine intake occurs; dosage adjustments in antidiabetic agents may be needed.
    Nitazoxanide: (Moderate) The active metabolite of nitazoxanide, tizoxanide, is highly bound to plasma proteins. Caution should be exercised when administering nitazoxanide concurrently with other highly plasma protein-bound drugs with narrow therapeutic indices because competition for binding sites may occur.
    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs: (Moderate) NSAIDs may enhance hypoglycemia in diabetic patients via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which indirectly increases insulin secretion. If NSAIDs are administered or discontinued in patients receiving oral antidiabetic agents, patients should be monitored for hypoglycemia or loss of blood glucose control. No clinically significant interaction between sulindac at daily doses of 400 mg and oral hypoglycemic agents has been observed. Sulindac, its sulfide metabolite, and sulfonylureas are highly bound to protein. Sulindac could displace the sulfonylureas, altering hypoglycemic activity. Careful patient monitoring is recommended to ensure that no change in their diabetes medicine dosage is required. A sulfonylurea dose adjustment may be needed, especially if sulindac doses greater than 400 mg daily are used or if the drug combination is used in patients with renal impairment or other metabolic defects that might increase sulindac blood concentrations.
    Norepinephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Octreotide: (Moderate) Monitor patients receiving octreotide concomitantly with insulin or other antidiabetic agents for changes in glycemic control and adjust doses of these medications accordingly. Octreotide alters the balance between the counter-regulatory hormones of insulin, glucagon, and growth hormone, which may result in hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. The hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia which occurs during octreotide acetate therapy is usually mild, but may result in overt diabetes mellitus or necessitate dose changes in insulin or other hypoglycemic agents. In patients with concomitant type1 diabetes mellitus, octreotide is likely to affect glucose regulation, and insulin requirements may be reduced. Symptomatic hypoglycemia, which may be severe, has been reported in type 1 diabetic patients. In Type 2 diabetes patients with partially intact insulin reserves, octreotide administration may result in decreases in plasma insulin levels and hyperglycemia.
    Olanzapine: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition.
    Olmesartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Omadacycline: (Moderate) Additive photosensitization may be seen with concurrent administration of sulfonylureas and other photosensitizing agents including tetracyclines. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin.
    Ombitasvir; Paritaprevir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Omeprazole; Sodium Bicarbonate: (Moderate) Monitor blood glucose concentrations closely during coadministration of glipizide and sodium bicarbonate. Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing its hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH.
    Oritavancin: (Moderate) Glipizide is metabolized by CYP2C9; oritavancin is a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor. Coadministration may result in elevated glipizide plasma concentrations. If these drugs are administered concurrently, blood glucose should be monitored closely.
    Orlistat: (Minor) Weight-loss may affect glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus. In many patients, glycemic control may improve. A reduction in dose of oral hypoglycemic medications may be required in some patients taking orlistat. Monitor blood glucose and glycemic control and adjust therapy as clinically indicated.
    Oxandrolone: (Moderate) Changes in insulin sensitivity or glycemic control may occur in patients treated with androgens. In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, may decrease antidiabetic agent dosage requirements. Moniitor blood glucose and HbA1C when these drugs are used together.
    Oxymetholone: (Moderate) Changes in insulin sensitivity or glycemic control may occur in patients treated with androgens. In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, may decrease antidiabetic agent dosage requirements. Moniitor blood glucose and HbA1C when these drugs are used together.
    Paliperidone: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition.
    Pasireotide: (Moderate) Monitor blood glucose levels regularly in patients with diabetes, especially when pasireotide treatment is initiated or when the dose is altered. Adjust treatment with antidiabetic agents as clinically indicated. Pasireotide inhibits the secretion of insulin and glucagon. Patients treated with pasireotide may experience either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia.
    Pegvisomant: (Moderate) Monitor blood glucose levels regularly in patients with diabetes, especially when pegvisomant treatment is initiated or when the dose is altered. Adjust treatment with antidiabetic agents as clinically indicated. Pegvisomant increases sensitivity to insulin by lowering the activity of growth hormone, and in some patients glucose tolerance improves with treatment. Patients with diabetes treated with pegvisomant and antidiabetic agents may be more likely to experience hypoglycemia.
    Pemoline: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Penbutolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Pentamidine: (Moderate) Pentamidine can be harmful to pancreatic cells. This effect may lead to hypoglycemia acutely, followed by hyperglycemia with prolonged pentamidine therapy. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be monitored for the need for dosage adjustments during the use of pentamidine.
    Pentoxifylline: (Moderate) Pentoxiphylline has been used concurrently with antidiabetic agents without observed problems, but it may enhance the hypoglycemic action of antidiabetic agents. Patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control while receiving pentoxifylline in combination with antidiabetic agents.
    Perindopril: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Perindopril; Amlodipine: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Phendimetrazine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Phenelzine: (Moderate) Animal data indicate that monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAO inhibitors) may stimulate insulin secretion. Inhibitors of MAO type A have been shown to prolong the hypoglycemic response to insulin and oral sulfonylureas. Serum glucose should be monitored closely when MAOI-type medications, including the selective MAO-B inhibitor selegiline, are added to any regimen containing antidiabetic agents.Although at low doses selegiline is selective for MAO type B, in doses above 30 to 40 mg/day, this selectivity is lost.
    Phenothiazines: (Moderate) Phenothiazines, especially chlorpromazine, may increase blood glucose concentrations. Hyperglycemia and glycosuria have been reported. Patients who are taking antidiabetic agents should monitor for worsening glycemic control when a phenothiazine is instituted. Also, concomitant use may increase the risk for phototoxicity. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure.
    Phentermine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Phentermine; Topiramate: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Phenytoin: (Minor) Phenytoin and other hydantoins have the potential to increase blood glucose and thus interact with antidiabetic agents pharmacodynamically. In addition, coadministration may result in decreased serum concentrations of chlorpropamide. Monitor blood glucose for changes in glycemic control. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients.
    Photosensitizing agents (topical): (Moderate) Additive photosensitization may be seen with concurrent administration of sulfonylureas and other photosensitizing agents. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin
    Photosensitizing agents: (Moderate) Use photosensitizing agents and sulfonylureas together with caution; the risk of severe burns/photosensitivity may be additive. If concurrent use is necessary, closely monitor patients for signs or symptoms of skin toxicity.
    Pindolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Porfimer: (Moderate) Use photosensitizing agents and sulfonylureas together with caution; the risk of severe burns/photosensitivity may be additive. If concurrent use is necessary, closely monitor patients for signs or symptoms of skin toxicity.
    Posaconazole: (Moderate) No clinically relevant interactions were reported when posaconazole was administered with glipizide during clinical trials; adjustments in posaconazole doses are not required. However, some healthy volunteers given the combination had decreased glucose concentrations. Therefore, glucose concentrations should be monitored in patients with diabetes when posaconazole is coadministered with glipizide.
    Prasterone, Dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA (Dietary Supplements): (Moderate) Changes in insulin sensitivity or glycemic control may occur in patients treated with androgens. In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, may decrease antidiabetic agent dosage requirements. Moniitor blood glucose and HbA1C when these drugs are used together.
    Prasterone, Dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA (FDA-approved): (Moderate) Changes in insulin sensitivity or glycemic control may occur in patients treated with androgens. In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, may decrease antidiabetic agent dosage requirements. Moniitor blood glucose and HbA1C when these drugs are used together.
    Prilocaine; Epinephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Probenecid: (Moderate) Probenecid is highly protein bound, and the hypoglycemic effect of sulfonylureas made be potentiated if these drugs are coadministered.
    Progestins: (Minor) Progestins can impair glucose tolerance. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for signs indicating changes in diabetic control when therapy with progestins is instituted or discontinued.
    Propoxyphene: (Moderate) Propoxyphene may enhance the hypoglycemic action of antidiabetic agents. Patients should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control while receiving propoxyphene in combination with antidiabetic agents.
    Propranolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Protease inhibitors: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Quetiapine: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition.
    Quinapril: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Quinolones: (Moderate) Monitor blood glucose carefully when systemic quinolones and antidiabetic agents, including sulfonylureas, are coadministered. Discontinue the quinolone if a hypoglycemic reaction occurs and initiate appropriate therapy immediately. Disturbances of blood glucose, including hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, have been reported in patients treated concomitantly with quinolones and an antidiabetic agent. Hypoglycemia, sometimes resulting in coma, can occur.
    Racepinephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Ramipril: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Ranitidine: (Moderate) Ranitidine has been shown to affect the pharmacokinetics of some oral sulfonylureas. Patients receiving sulfonylureas should be observed for evidence of altered glycemic response when ranitidine is instituted or discontinued. The mechanism of this interaction may involve either increasing the absorption or decreasing the clearance of the sulfonylurea. Asymptomatic hypoglycemia has been observed as a result of this interaction. It is unclear at this time if famotidine or nizatidine interact with oral sulfonylureas.
    Reserpine: (Moderate) Reserpine may mask the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia. Patients receiving reserpine concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Rifamycins: (Minor) Rifamycins induce hepatic isoenzymes CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9. Drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9, including sulfonylureas, may require dosage adjustments when administered concurrently with rifamycins.
    Risperidone: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition.
    Ritodrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Ritonavir: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Rosiglitazone: (Major) A maximum dose of 8 mg/day of rosiglitazone is recommended when used in combination with sulfonylureas; the incidence of adverse effects including hypoglycemia is increased with larger doses. In one clinical study, rosiglitazone 4 or 8 mg/day was added to failed glimepiride plus metformin therapy. The incidence of hypoglycemia (blood glucose concentrations <= 50 mg/dl) was 18.6% in the 4 mg/day group compared with 28% in the 8 mg/day group. In addition, 4 or 8 mg/day of rosiglitazone has been added to failed glyburide plus metformin therapy. The incidence of hypoglycemia was higher in the rosiglitazone (average dose 7.4 mg/day)+glyburide+metformin group (22%) when compared to the glyburide+metformin group (3%). Patients should be instructed to monitor blood glucose concentrations more frequently. Dosage adjustments may be indicated.
    Sacubitril; Valsartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Salsalate: (Moderate) If salicylates and sulfonylureas are to be administered together, patients should be monitored for changes in glycemic control. Salicylates, by inhibiting prostaglandin E2 synthesis, can indirectly increase insulin secretion. Thus, salicylates can decrease blood sugar and may potentiate the effects of other antidiabetic agents. This mechanism may explain how salicylates can potentiate the clinical effects of sulfonylureas; however, displacement of sulfonylureas from protein binding sites has also been reported. In large doses, salicylates uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, deplete hepatic and muscle glycogen, and cause hyperglycemia and glycosuria.
    Saquinavir: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Sarecycline: (Moderate) Additive photosensitization may be seen with concurrent administration of sulfonylureas and other photosensitizing agents including tetracyclines. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin.
    Segesterone Acetate; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Patients receiving antidiabetic agents should be periodically monitored for changes in glycemic control when hormone therapy is instituted or discontinued. Estrogens can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by impairing glucose tolerance. Changes in glucose tolerance occur more commonly in patients receiving 50 mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol (or equivalent) per day in combined oral contraceptives (COCs), which are not commonly used in practice since the marketing of lower dose COCs, patches, injections and rings. The presence or absence of a concomitant progestin may influence the significance of any hormonal effect on glucose homeostasis.
    Selegiline: (Moderate) Animal data indicate that monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAO inhibitors) may stimulate insulin secretion. Inhibitors of MAO type A have been shown to prolong the hypoglycemic response to insulin and oral sulfonylureas. Serum glucose should be monitored closely when MAOI-type medications, including the selective MAO-B inhibitor selegiline, are added to any regimen containing antidiabetic agents.Although at low doses selegiline is selective for MAO type B, in doses above 30 to 40 mg/day, this selectivity is lost.
    Sodium Bicarbonate: (Moderate) Monitor blood glucose concentrations closely during coadministration of glipizide and sodium bicarbonate. Antacids have been reported to increase the absorption of glipizide, enhancing its hypoglycemic effects. Although the exact mechanism is not known, theoretically it may be due to alterations in gastric pH.
    Sofosbuvir: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood glucose levels if sofosbuvir is administered with antidiabetic agents. Dose adjustments of the antidiabetic agents may be needed. Altered blood glucose control, resulting in serious symptomatic hypoglycemia, has been reported in diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic agents in combination with direct acting antivirals, such as sofosbuvir.
    Sofosbuvir; Velpatasvir: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood glucose levels if sofosbuvir is administered with antidiabetic agents. Dose adjustments of the antidiabetic agents may be needed. Altered blood glucose control, resulting in serious symptomatic hypoglycemia, has been reported in diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic agents in combination with direct acting antivirals, such as sofosbuvir. (Moderate) Closely monitor blood glucose levels if velpatasvir is administered with antidiabetic agents. Dose adjustments of the antidiabetic agents may be needed. Altered blood glucose control, resulting in serious symptomatic hypoglycemia, has been reported in diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic agents in combination with direct acting antivirals, such as velpatasvir.
    Sofosbuvir; Velpatasvir; Voxilaprevir: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood glucose levels if sofosbuvir is administered with antidiabetic agents. Dose adjustments of the antidiabetic agents may be needed. Altered blood glucose control, resulting in serious symptomatic hypoglycemia, has been reported in diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic agents in combination with direct acting antivirals, such as sofosbuvir. (Moderate) Closely monitor blood glucose levels if velpatasvir is administered with antidiabetic agents. Dose adjustments of the antidiabetic agents may be needed. Altered blood glucose control, resulting in serious symptomatic hypoglycemia, has been reported in diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic agents in combination with direct acting antivirals, such as velpatasvir. (Moderate) Closely monitor blood glucose levels if voxilaprevir is administered with antidiabetic agents. Dose adjustments of the antidiabetic agents may be needed. Altered blood glucose control, resulting in serious symptomatic hypoglycemia, has been reported in diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic agents in combination with direct acting antivirals, such as voxilaprevir.
    Somatropin, rh-GH: (Moderate) Patients with diabetes mellitus should be monitored closely during somatropin (recombinant rhGH) therapy. Antidiabetic drugs (e.g., insulin or oral agents) may require adjustment when somatropin therapy is instituted in these patients. Growth hormones, such as somatropin, may decrease insulin sensitivity, leading to glucose intolerance and loss of blood glucose control. Therefore, glucose levels should be monitored periodically in all patients treated with somatropin, especially in those with risk factors for diabetes mellitus.
    Sotalol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Sparfloxacin: (Moderate) Disturbances of blood glucose, including hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, have been reported in patients treated concomitantly with quinolones and an antidiabetic agent. Rare cases of severe hypoglycemia have been reported with concomitant use of quinolones and glyburide. Therefore, careful monitoring of blood glucose is recommended when quinolones and antidiabetic agents are coadministered. Monitor blood glucose when quinolones and antidiabetic agents are coadministered.
    Sulfacetamide: (Moderate) Sulfonamides may cause photosensitization and may increase the photosensitizing effects of sulfonylureas. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure of treated areas.
    Sulfacetamide; Sulfur: (Moderate) Sulfonamides may cause photosensitization and may increase the photosensitizing effects of sulfonylureas. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure of treated areas.
    Sulfinpyrazone: (Moderate) Sulfinpyrazone is an inhibitor of CYP2C9. Sulfinpyrazone may inhibit the hepatic metabolism of sulfonylureas, CYP2C9 substrates. Patients should be monitored for an increased hypoglycemic effect.
    Sulfonamides: (Moderate) Sulfonamides may enhance the hypoglycemic action of antidiabetic agents; patients with diabetes mellitus should be closely monitored during sulfonamide treatment. Taking these drugs together may also increase risk for phototoxicity. Patients should limit sunlight and UV exposure, and follow proper precautions for sunscreens and protective clothing. Sulfonamides may induce hypoglycemia in some patients by increasing the secretion of insulin from the pancreas. Patients at risk for hypoglycemia due to sulfonamides include those with compromised renal function, those fasting for prolonged periods, those that are malnourished, and those receiving high or excessive doses of sulfonamides.
    Sympathomimetics: (Moderate) Sympathomimetic agents and adrenergic agonists tend to increase blood glucose concentrations when administered systemically. Monitor for loss of glycemic control when pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and other sympathomimetics are administered to patients taking antidiabetic agents. Epinephrine and other sympathomimetics, through stimulation of alpha- and beta- receptors, increase hepatic glucose production and glycogenolysis and inhibit insulin secretion. Also, adrenergic medications may decrease glucose uptake by muscle cells. For treatment of cold symptoms, nasal decongestants may be preferable for short term, limited use (1 to 3 days) as an alternative to systemic decongestants in patients taking medications for diabetes.
    Tacrolimus: (Moderate) Tacrolimus has been reported to cause hyperglycemia and has been implicated in causing insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in patients after renal transplantation. Tacrolimus may have direct beta-cell toxicity. Patients should be monitored for worsening of glycemic control if therapy with tacrolimus is initiated in patients receiving antidiabetic agents.
    Tazarotene: (Moderate) The manufacturer states that tazarotene should be administered with caution in patients who are also taking drugs known to be photosensitizers, such as sulfonylureas, as concomitant use may augment phototoxicity. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure of treated areas.
    Tegaserod: (Moderate) Tegaserod can enhance gastric emptying in diabetic patients, blood glucose can be affected, which, in turn, may affect the clinical response to antidiabetic agents. The dosing of antidiabetic agents may require adjustment in patients who receive GI prokinetic agents concomitantly.
    Telmisartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Testolactone: (Moderate) Changes in insulin sensitivity or glycemic control may occur in patients treated with androgens. In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, may decrease antidiabetic agent dosage requirements. Moniitor blood glucose and HbA1C when these drugs are used together.
    Testosterone: (Moderate) Changes in insulin sensitivity or glycemic control may occur in patients treated with androgens. In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, may decrease antidiabetic agent dosage requirements. Moniitor blood glucose and HbA1C when these drugs are used together.
    Tetracycline: (Moderate) Additive photosensitization may be seen with concurrent administration of sulfonylureas and other photosensitizing agents including tetracyclines. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin.
    Tetracyclines: (Moderate) Additive photosensitization may be seen with concurrent administration of sulfonylureas and other photosensitizing agents including tetracyclines. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin.
    Tezacaftor; Ivacaftor: (Minor) Increased monitoring is recommended if ivacaftor is administered concurrently with CYP2C9 substrates, such as glipizide. In vitro studies showed ivacaftor to be a weak inhibitor of CYP2C9. Co-administration may lead to increased exposure to CYP2C9 substrates; however, the clinical impact of this has not yet been determined.
    Thiazide diuretics: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Thyroid hormones: (Minor) Addition of thyroid hormones to antidiabetic or insulin therapy may result in increased dosage requirements of the antidiabetic agents. Blood sugars should be carefully monitored when thyroid therapy is added, discontinued or doses changed.
    Timolol: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Tipranavir: (Moderate) New onset diabetes mellitus, exacerbation of diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance have been reported with use of anti-retroviral protease inhibitors. A possible mechanism is impairment of beta-cell function. Onset averaged approximately 63 days after initiating protease inhibitor therapy, but has occurred as early as 4 days after beginning therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis has occurred in some patients including patients who were not diabetic prior to protease inhibitor treatment. Patients on antidiabetic agents should be closely monitored for changes in glycemic control, specifically hyperglycemia, if protease inhibitor therapy is initiated.
    Tobacco: (Minor) Tobacco smoking is known to aggravate insulin resistance. The cessation of nicotine therapy or tobacco smoking may result in a decrease in blood glucose. Blood glucose concentrations should be monitored more closely whenever a change in either nicotine intake or smoking status occurs; dosage adjustments in antidiabetic agents may be needed.
    Torsemide: (Minor) Hyperglycemia has been detected during torsemide therapy, but the incidence is low. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between torsemide and all antidiabetic agents. Monitor blood glucose.
    Trandolapril: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Trandolapril; Verapamil: (Moderate) ACE inhibitors may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of insulin or other antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. Patients receiving antidiabetic agents can become hypoglycemic if ACE inhibitors are administered concomitantly. Patients receiving these drugs concomitantly with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Tranylcypromine: (Moderate) Animal data indicate that monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAO inhibitors) may stimulate insulin secretion. Inhibitors of MAO type A have been shown to prolong the hypoglycemic response to insulin and oral sulfonylureas. Serum glucose should be monitored closely when MAOI-type medications, including the selective MAO-B inhibitor selegiline, are added to any regimen containing antidiabetic agents.Although at low doses selegiline is selective for MAO type B, in doses above 30 to 40 mg/day, this selectivity is lost.
    Tretinoin, ATRA: (Moderate) A manufacturer of topical tretinoin states that tretinoin, ATRA should be administered with caution in patients who are also taking drugs known to be photosensitizers, such as sulfonylureas, as concomitant use may augment phototoxicity. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure of treated areas.
    Triamterene: (Minor) Triamterene can interfere with the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents. This can lead to a loss of diabetic control, so diabetic patients should be monitored closely.
    Trovafloxacin, Alatrofloxacin: (Moderate) Disturbances of blood glucose, including hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, have been reported in patients treated concomitantly with quinolones and an antidiabetic agent. Rare cases of severe hypoglycemia have been reported with concomitant use of quinolones and glyburide. Therefore, careful monitoring of blood glucose is recommended when quinolones and antidiabetic agents are coadministered. Monitor blood glucose when quinolones and antidiabetic agents are coadministered.
    Valsartan: (Moderate) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) may enhance the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by improving insulin sensitivity. In addition, angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been associated with a reduced incidence in the development of new-onset diabetes in patients with hypertension or other cardiac disease. Patients receiving an ARB in combination with antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in glycemic control.
    Vemurafenib: (Moderate) Concomitant use of vemurafenib and glipizide may result in increased glipizide concentrations. Vemurafenib is a CYP2C9 inhibitor and glipizide is a CYP2C9 substrate. Monitor serum glucose concentrations if glipizide is coadministered with CYP2C9 inhibitors. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Verteporfin: (Moderate) Use photosensitizing agents and sulfonylureas together with caution; the risk of severe burns/photosensitivity may be additive. If concurrent use is necessary, closely monitor patients for signs or symptoms of skin toxicity.
    Voriconazole: (Moderate) Voriconazole should be used cautiously with sulfonylureas. The combination of voriconazole and oral antidiabetic agents may result in severe hypoglycemia. Voriconazole may inhibit the metabolism of sulfonylureas. Blood glucose concentrations should be monitored and possible dose adjustments of hypoglycemics may need to be made.
    Warfarin: (Moderate) The interaction between oral anticoagulants and oral sulfonylureas is complex; both enhancement or reduction of hypoprothrombinemic response to oral anticoagulants has been reported in various literature accounts along with a potential for altered hypoglycemic response to the sulfonylurea. One proposed mechanism may be related to displacement of the drugs from plasma protein binding sites. Dicumarol has been reported to inhibit the metabolism of chlorpropamide and tolbutamide, however, warfarin did not exhibit a similar effect on tolbutamide kinetics. Glyburide has been reported to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin, although other reports have showed no interaction. Warfarin appears less likely to interact with sulfonylureas than dicumarol. In clinical trials, glimepiride therapy resulted in a slight, but statistically significant decrease in pharmacodynamic response to warfarin. The reductions in effect are unlikely to be clinically important in most cases. Nevertheless, it would be wise for clinicians to use warfarin and sulfonylureas together cautiously until the combined effects of the drugs are known. Monitor the INR as indicated and be alert for altered blood sugar control when either of these drugs is added or discontinued.
    Ziprasidone: (Moderate) Atypical antipsychotic therapy may aggravate diabetes mellitus and cause metabolic changes such as hyperglycemia. Monitor patients on antidiabetic agents for worsening glycemic control. The atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes, including hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic states, and diabetic coma. Aggravation of diabetes mellitus has been reported. Possible mechanisms include atypical antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance or direct beta-cell inhibition.

    PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

    Pregnancy

    Glipizide was not detected in the breast milk of 2 postpartum, breast-feeding women receiving 5 mg/day of glipizide; furthermore, and importantly, neither infant experienced hypoglycemia. This small study suggests that breast-feeding in women taking glipizide may be safe, but more data are needed before glipizide's use can be routinely recommended due the limited data.[31568] The manufacturer of glipizide continues to recommend that glipizide not be used in women who are breast-feeding. If the drug is discontinued and blood glucose is not controlled on diet and exercise alone, insulin therapy should be considered.[46720] Tolbutamide is usually regarded as compatible with breast-feeding.[27500] Glyburide may be a suitable alternative since it was not detected in the breast milk of lactating women who received single and multiple doses of glyburide.[31568] Other oral hypoglycemics may be considered as possible alternatives during breast-feeding. Because acarbose has limited systemic absorption, which results in minimal maternal plasma concentrations, clinically significant exposure via breast milk is not expected.[46303] Metformin monotherapy may also be a consideration; data have shown that metformin is excreted into breast milk in small amounts and adverse effects on infant plasma glucose have not been reported in human studies.[31407] [31408] [31409] If any oral hypoglycemics are used during breast feeding, the nursing infant should be monitored for signs of hypoglycemia, such as increased fussiness or somnolence.[46104]

    MECHANISM OF ACTION

    Glipizide lowers blood sugar by stimulating pancreatic islet cells, which causes an increase in insulin secretion. Sulfonylureas are believed to bind to ATP-sensitive potassium-channel receptors on the pancreatic cell surface, thereby reducing potassium conductance and causing depolarization of the membrane. Depolarization stimulates calcium ion influx through voltage-sensitive calcium channels, raising intracellular concentrations of calcium ions, which induces the secretion, or exocytosis, of insulin. The drug is not effective in the absence of functioning beta-cells, as occurs in diabetes mellitus type 1, or when the number of viable beta-cells is low, as occurs in severe cases of diabetes mellitus type 2.
     
    Prolonged administration of glipizide also produces extrapancreatic effects that contribute to its hypoglycemic activity. These effects include reduction of basal hepatic glucose production and an enhanced peripheral sensitivity to insulin secondary to an increase in insulin receptors or to changes in the events that follow insulin-receptor binding. The relative importance of each of these actions to the overall therapeutic effect of the drug will vary among oral antidiabetic agents and from patient to patient, which may account for the variability in potency among these drugs. Unlike other sulfonylureas, glipizide-induced increases in endogenous insulin secretion appear to be sustained during long-term administration. Like glyburide, glipizide exhibits mild diuretic actions, but it does not affect uric acid concentrations.

    PHARMACOKINETICS

    Glipizide is administered orally. It is distributed within the extracellular fluid and is highly protein-bound (98 to 99%). The apparent volume of distribution is 11 L. First-pass metabolism is not significant. Glipizide is extensively metabolized in the liver to inactive metabolites. The primary metabolites are inactive aromatic hydroxylation products and polar conjugates. A minor metabolite, an acetylamino-ethyl benzene derivative, which accounts for less than 2% of a dose, is reported to have 1/10 to 1/3 as much hypoglycemic activity as the parent compound. Less than 10% of a dose is excreted as unchanged drug in urine and feces; approximately 90% of a dose is excreted as biotransformation products in urine (80%) and feces (10%) The mean terminal elimination half-life ranged from 2 to 5 hours in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
     
    Affected cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes and drug transporters: CYP2C9
    Glipizide is a CYP2C9 substrate, and theoretically CYP2C9 inhibitors or inducers may affect drug exposure.

    Oral Route

    Glipizide is rapidly and completely absorbed from the GI tract. The absolute bioavailability of glipizide was 100% after single oral doses in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Plasma drug concentrations increased proportionately with dose. Peak plasma concentrations occur 1 to 3 hours after a single oral dose of glipizide regular release tablets. Total absorption and disposition of an oral dose was unaffected by food in normal volunteers, but absorption was delayed by about 40 minutes. Thus, glipizide was more effective when administered about 30 minutes before, rather than with, a test meal in diabetic patients. Beginning 2 to 3 hours after administration of glipizide extended-release (ER) tablets, plasma drug concentrations gradually rise reaching maximum concentrations within 6 to 12 hours after dosing. With subsequent once-daily dosing of glipizide ER tablets, plasma glipizide concentrations are maintained throughout the 24 hour dosing interval with less peak to trough fluctuation than that observed with twice daily dosing of immediate-release glipizide. The mean relative bioavailability of glipizide in 21 males with type 2 diabetes mellitus after administration of 20 mg glipizide ER, compared to immediate-release glipizide (10 mg given twice daily), was 90% at steady-state. Administration of glipizide ER tablets with food has no effect on the 2 to 3 hour lag time in drug absorption. In a single dose, food effect study in 21 healthy male subjects, the administration of glipizide ER tablets immediately before a high fat breakfast resulted in a 40% increase in the glipizide mean Cmax value, which was significant, but the effect on the AUC was not significant. There was no change in glucose response between the fed and fasting state.