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    Dihydropyridine Calcium Channel Blockers

    DEA CLASS

    Rx

    DESCRIPTION

    Oral dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker; potent peripheral vasodilator
    Used for hypertension and angina
    Once daily dosing due to long half-life

    COMMON BRAND NAMES

    Katerzia, Norvasc

    HOW SUPPLIED

    Amlodipine/Amlodipine Besylate/Norvasc Oral Tab: 2.5mg, 5mg, 10mg
    Katerzia Oral Susp: 1mL, 1.3mg

    DOSAGE & INDICATIONS

    For the treatment of hypertension.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    5 mg PO once daily initially. Max: 10 mg/day. Adjust based on clinical response; wait 7 to 14 days between titration steps.[29090] [64409]

    Geriatric and Debilitated patients

    2.5 mg PO once daily initially. Max: 10 mg/day. Adjust based on clinical response; wait 7 to 14 days between titration steps.[29090] [64409]

    Children and Adolescents 6 to 17 years

    2.5 to 5 mg PO once daily; Max: 5 mg/day.[29090] [32347] [62353] Some investigators have reported initial doses of 0.05 to 0.3 mg/kg/day PO with a Max of 0.34 mg/kg/day (up to 10 mg/day) or 0.6 mg/kg/day (up to 20 mg/day).[32337] [32338] [33329] [32347] [32463] [62353] Adult Max: 10 mg/day. Adjust dose every 5 to 7 days; it may require several weeks for the maximum hypotensive effect to fully manifest. Younger children require higher doses per kg of body weight relative to older children and may benefit from twice daily dosing in some cases.[32338] [33354]

    Children 1 to 5 years†

    0.1 mg/kg/dose PO once daily initially; Max: 0.6 mg/kg/dose, up to 5 mg/dose is recommended by pediatric hypertension guidelines.[62353] However, initial doses ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/kg/day PO, given in 1 or 2 divided doses, have been recommended. Max reported doses = 0.3 to 0.6 mg/kg/day (up to 10 to 20 mg/day). Adult Max dose: 10 mg/day. Adjust dose every 5 to 7 days; it may require several weeks for the maximum hypotensive effect to fully manifest. Younger children require higher doses per kg of body weight relative to older children and may benefit from twice daily dosing in some cases.[32338] [32462] [32463] [32465] [33329] [33354]

    For the treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD), including chronic stable angina, vasospastic angina (variant angina), and CAD documented by angiography and without heart failure or ejection fraction less than 40%.
    Oral dosage

    NOTE: Based on the findings of the CAMELOT trial, amlodipine is indicated for use in patients with recently documented CAD to reduce the risk of hospitalization due to angina and to reduce the risk of a coronary revascularization procedure.

    Adults

    5 to 10 mg PO once daily. Usual dosage: 10 mg PO once daily.

    Geriatric and Debilitated patients

    5 mg PO once daily. Max: 10 mg/day.

    MAXIMUM DOSAGE

    Adults

    10 mg/day PO.

    Geriatric

    10 mg/day PO.

    Adolescents

    5 mg/day PO is the maximum dosage per FDA-approved labeling; however, doses up to 0.6 mg/kg/day PO (Max: 20 mg/day) have been reported.

    Children

    6 to 12 years: 5 mg/day PO is the maximum dosage per FDA-approved labeling; however, doses up to 0.6 mg/kg/day PO (Max: 20 mg/day) have been reported.
    1 to 5 years: Safety and efficacy have not been established; however, doses up to 0.6 mg/kg/day PO (Max: 20 mg/day) have been reported.

    Infants

    Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

    Hepatic Impairment

    Initiate adult dosage at 2.5 mg PO once daily for hypertension or 5 mg PO once daily for angina; adjust dosage based on clinical response. Specific guidelines for dosage adjustments in pediatric patients with hepatic impairment are not available.

    Renal Impairment

    No dosage adjustment is needed.
     
    Intermittent hemodialysis
    Amlodipine is highly protein bound and is not likely to be significantly removed by hemodialysis.

    ADMINISTRATION

    Oral Administration

    May administer without regard to meals.

    Oral Liquid Formulations

    Oral suspension
    Shake well before using.
    Measure with a calibrated oral syringe.
    Storage: Keep in refrigerator (36 to 46 degrees F [2 to 8 degrees C]).[64409]

    Extemporaneous Compounding-Oral

    Extemporaneous 1mg/mL amlodipine oral suspension preparation:[31741]
    NOTE: The extemporaneous preparation of amlodipine is not approved by the FDA.
    With a mortar and pestle, grind twenty-four 5 mg amlodipine tablets to a fine powder.
    In a separate container, mix 60 ml of Ora-Sweet with 60 mL of Ora-Plus to make the base solution. Shake well.
    Add a small amount of base solution to amlodipine powder to form a paste. Add geometric amounts of the base solution while mixing well, leaving enough base solution to rinse the mortar after the mixture is transferred to a graduated cylinder.
    Transfer mixture to a graduated cylinder and add the additional base solution to make a total volume of 120 mL.
    Storage: Place in an amber plastic bottle. Shake well before each use. These oral suspensions are stable for 90 days refrigerated or up to 56 days when stored at room temperature (approximately 25 degrees C or 77 degrees F).

    STORAGE

    Katerzia:
    - Avoid excessive heat (above 104 degrees F)
    - Protect from freezing
    - Protect from light
    - Refrigerate (between 36 and 46 degrees F)
    Norvasc:
    - Protect from light
    - Store between 68 to 77 degrees F, excursions permitted 59 to 86 degrees F
    - Store in a dry place

    CONTRAINDICATIONS / PRECAUTIONS

    General Information

    Amlodipine is contraindicated for use in patients with known amlodipine hypersensitivity.

    Hepatic disease

    Amlodipine should be used with caution in patients with hepatic disease; dosage adjustment with slow dose titration is recommended. The amlodipine elimination half-life is prolonged in patients with hepatic disease.[29090] [64409]

    Aortic stenosis

    Systematic hypotension is possible with amlodipine, particularly in patients with aortic stenosis. Because of the gradual onset of action of amlodipine, acute hypotension is unlikely.

    Acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease

    Worsening angina and acute myocardial infarction can develop after starting or increasing the dose of amlodipine, particularly in adult patients with severe obstructive coronary artery disease.

    Pregnancy

    Data with amlodipine use in pregnancy are insufficient to inform a drug-associated risk for major birth defects and miscarriage. Hypertension during pregnancy increases the risk of preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, premature delivery, and delivery complications. Fetal risks include intrauterine growth restriction and intrauterine death. Data for animal reproductive studies indicate no evidence of adverse developmental effects when pregnant rats and rabbits were treated orally with amlodipine during organogenesis at doses approximately 10- and 20-times the maximum recommended human dose, respectively. Litter size for rats was decreased by about 50% and the number of intrauterine deaths was increased approximately 5-fold. Amlodipine has been shown to prolong the gestation period and the duration of labor in rats at this dose.[29090] [64409]

    Breast-feeding

    Amlodipine is present in human breastmilk; however, no adverse effects of amlodipine on the breast-fed infant have been observed. There is no information on the effect of amlodipine on milk production in breast-feeding women.[29090] [64409] In a study of 31 lactating women with pregnancy-induced hypertension, the median relative infant dose (RID) of amlodipine in human milk was 4.2% (interquartile range, 3.12% to 7.25%) and the maximum RID was 15.2%.[64369] In another study that enrolled 8 lactating women, the average RID for amlodipine was 3.4% (range, 1.56% to 4.32%).[64368]

    Geriatric

    Reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses to amlodipine between older adult and younger adult patients. Geriatric patients have decreased clearance of amlodipine with a resulting increase of AUC of approximately 40% to 60%, and a lower initial dose may be required. Use careful dosage titration and monitoring.[29090] [64409] The federal Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) regulates medication use in residents of long-term care facilities. According to the OBRA guidelines, antihypertensive regimens should be individualized to achieve the desired outcome while minimizing adverse effects. Antihypertensives may cause dizziness, postural hypotension, fatigue, and there is an increased risk for falls. In addition, calcium channel blockers may cause peripheral edema and clinically significant constipation; some agents may cause generalized aching, headache, and muscle pain. There are many drug interactions that can potentiate the effects of antihypertensives. Some antihypertensives require a gradual taper to avoid adverse consequences caused by abrupt discontinuation.[60742]

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Severe

    pancreatitis / Delayed / 0-1.0
    angioedema / Rapid / 0-1.0
    visual impairment / Early / 0-1.0
    ventricular tachycardia / Early / 0-1.0
    bradycardia / Rapid / 0-1.0
    arrhythmia exacerbation / Early / 0-1.0
    vasculitis / Delayed / 0-1.0
    atrial fibrillation / Early / 0-1.0
    erythema multiforme / Delayed / 0-1.0
    myocardial infarction / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Moderate

    peripheral edema / Delayed / 13.6-32.4
    edema / Delayed / 1.8-14.6
    palpitations / Early / 0.7-4.5
    impotence (erectile dysfunction) / Delayed / 0-2.0
    dyspnea / Early / 0-2.0
    thrombocytopenia / Delayed / 0-1.0
    leukopenia / Delayed / 0-1.0
    orthostatic hypotension / Delayed / 0-1.0
    peripheral neuropathy / Delayed / 0-1.0
    dysphagia / Delayed / 0-1.0
    constipation / Delayed / 0-1.0
    gingival hyperplasia / Delayed / 0-1.0
    chest pain (unspecified) / Early / 0-1.0
    sinus tachycardia / Rapid / 0-1.0
    depression / Delayed / 0-1.0
    hot flashes / Early / 0-1.0
    conjunctivitis / Delayed / 0-1.0
    erythema / Early / 0-1.0
    hyperglycemia / Delayed / 0-1.0
    angina / Early / Incidence not known
    hypotension / Rapid / Incidence not known
    hepatitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    elevated hepatic enzymes / Delayed / Incidence not known
    jaundice / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Mild

    flushing / Rapid / 0.7-4.5
    fatigue / Early / 4.5-4.5
    dizziness / Early / 1.1-3.4
    nausea / Early / 2.9-2.9
    asthenia / Delayed / 0-2.0
    libido decrease / Delayed / 0-2.0
    muscle cramps / Delayed / 0-2.0
    rash / Early / 0-2.0
    pruritus / Rapid / 0-2.0
    abdominal pain / Early / 1.6-1.6
    drowsiness / Early / 1.3-1.6
    epistaxis / Delayed / 0-1.0
    vomiting / Early / 0-1.0
    tremor / Early / 0-1.0
    diarrhea / Early / 0-1.0
    flatulence / Early / 0-1.0
    anorexia / Delayed / 0-1.0
    vertigo / Early / 0-1.0
    paresthesias / Delayed / 0-1.0
    syncope / Early / 0-1.0
    anxiety / Delayed / 0-1.0
    insomnia / Early / 0-1.0
    nightmares / Early / 0-1.0
    hypoesthesia / Delayed / 0-1.0
    chills / Rapid / 0-1.0
    malaise / Early / 0-1.0
    myalgia / Early / 0-1.0
    weight loss / Delayed / 0-1.0
    back pain / Delayed / 0-1.0
    arthralgia / Delayed / 0-1.0
    weight gain / Delayed / 0-1.0
    xerostomia / Early / 0-1.0
    tinnitus / Delayed / 0-1.0
    ocular pain / Early / 0-1.0
    diplopia / Early / 0-1.0
    purpura / Delayed / 0-1.0
    maculopapular rash / Early / 0-1.0
    diaphoresis / Early / 0-1.0
    increased urinary frequency / Early / 0-1.0
    nocturia / Early / 0-1.0
    polydipsia / Early / 0-1.0
    gynecomastia / Delayed / Incidence not known

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Acebutolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Moderate) Concomitant use of dihydrocodeine with amlodipine may increase dihydrocodeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6, increased dihydromorphine concentrations, and prolonged opioid adverse reactions, including hypotension, respiratory depression, profound sedation, coma, and death. If coadministration is necessary, monitor patients closely at frequent intervals and consider a dosage reduction of dihydrocodeine until stable drug effects are achieved. Discontinuation of amlodipine could decrease dihydrocodeine plasma concentrations, decrease opioid efficacy, and potentially lead to a withdrawal syndrome in those with physical dependence to dihydrocodeine. If amlodipine is discontinued, monitor the patient carefully and consider increasing the opioid dosage if appropriate. Amlodipine is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4, an isoenzyme partially responsible for the metabolism of dihydrocodeine.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine : (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Acetaminophen; Codeine: (Moderate) Monitor for an increase in codeine-related adverse reactions including sedation and respiratory depression if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary; adjust the dose of codeine if necessary. Codeine is primarily metabolized by CYP2D6 to morphine, and by CYP3A4 to norcodeine; norcodeine does not have analgesic properties. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. Concomitant use may result in an increase in codeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6 and increased morphine concentrations.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Acetaminophen; Dichloralphenazone; Isometheptene: (Major) Isometheptene has sympathomimetic properties. Patients taking antihypertensive agents may need to have their therapy modified. Careful blood pressure monitoring is recommended.
    Acetaminophen; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Acetaminophen; Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone.
    Acetaminophen; Oxycodone: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of oxycodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. If amlodipine is discontinued, consider increasing the oxycodone dose until stable drug effects are achieved and monitor for evidence of opioid withdrawal. Oxycodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with a weak inhibitor like amlodipine can increase oxycodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of oxycodone. If amlodipine is discontinued, oxycodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to oxycodone.
    Acetaminophen; Propoxyphene: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as propoxyphene, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when propoxyphene is coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored.
    Acetaminophen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Acrivastine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Adenosine: (Moderate) Use adenosine with caution in the presence of calcium-channel blockers due to the potential for additive or synergistic depressant effects on the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes.
    Aldesleukin, IL-2: (Moderate) Calcium channel blockers may potentiate the hypotension seen with aldesleukin, IL 2.
    Alemtuzumab: (Moderate) Alemtuzumab may cause hypotension. Careful monitoring of blood pressure and hypotensive symptoms is recommended especially in patients with ischemic heart disease and in patients on antihypertensive agents.
    Alfentanil: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of alfentanil with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. If amlodipine is discontinued, consider increasing the alfentanil dose until stable drug effects are achieved and monitor for evidence of opioid withdrawal. Alfentanil is a sensitive CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with weak CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase alfentanil exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of alfentanil. If amlodipine is discontinued, alfentanil plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to alfentanil.
    Alprazolam: (Major) Avoid coadministration of alprazolam and amlodipine due to the potential for elevated alprazolam concentrations, which may cause prolonged sedation and respiratory depression. If coadministration is necessary, consider reducing the dose of alprazolam as clinically appropriate and monitor for an increase in alprazolam-related adverse reactions. Lorazepam, oxazepam, or temazepam may be safer alternatives if a benzodiazepine must be administered in combination with amlodipine, as these benzodiazepines are not oxidatively metabolized. Alprazolam is a CYP3A4 substrate and amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. Coadministration with another weak CYP3A4 inhibitor increased alprazolam maximum concentration by 82%, decreased clearance by 42%, and increased half-life by 16%.
    Alprostadil: (Minor) The concomitant use of systemic alprostadil injection and antihypertensive agents, like calcium channel blockers, may cause additive hypotension. Caution is advised with this combination. Systemic drug interactions with the urethral suppository (MUSE) or alprostadil intracavernous injection are unlikely in most patients because low or undetectable amounts of the drug are found in the peripheral venous circulation following administration. In those men with significant corpora cavernosa venous leakage, hypotension might be more likely. Use caution with in-clinic dosing for erectile dysfunction (ED) and monitor for the effects on blood pressure. In addition, the presence of medications in the circulation that attenuate erectile function may influence the response to alprostadil. However, in clinical trials with alprostadil intracavernous injection, anti-hypertensive agents had no apparent effect on the safety and efficacy of alprostadil.
    Amifostine: (Major) Patients receiving calcium-channel blockers should be closely monitored during amifostine infusions due to additive effects. Patients receiving amifostine at doses recommended for chemotherapy should have antihypertensive therapy interrupted 24 hours preceding administration of amifostine. If the antihypertensive cannot be stopped for 24 hours before chemotherapy doses of amifostine, patients should not receive amifostine.
    Aminolevulinic Acid: (Minor) Preclinical data suggest that calcium-channel blockers could decrease the efficacy of photosensitizing agents used in photodynamic therapy.
    Amiodarone: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with amiodarone is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate and amiodarone is a moderate CYP3A inhibitor. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. However, coadministration with another moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in healthy volunteers did not significantly change amlodipine exposure.
    Amlodipine; Celecoxib: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Amoxicillin; Clarithromycin; Omeprazole: (Major) Avoid coadministration of clarithromycin and amlodipine, particularly in geriatric patients, due to an increased risk of hypotension and acute kidney injury. If the use of a macrolide antibiotic is necessary in a patient receiving amlodipine therapy, azithromycin is the preferred agent. If coadministration is unavoidable, monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and clarithromycin is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor. A retrospective, case crossover study, found the risk of hospitalization due to hypotension or shock to be significantly increased in geriatric patients exposed to clarithromycin during concurrent calcium-channel blocker therapy (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.3-6.1). Concurrent use of azithromycin was not associated with an increased risk of hypotension (OR 1.5, 95% CI 0.8-2.8).
    Amphetamine; Dextroamphetamine Salts: (Minor) Amphetamines increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of some antihypertensive agents, like calcium-channel blockers. Close monitoring of blood pressure is advised.
    Amprenavir: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Amyl Nitrite: (Moderate) Nitroglycerin can cause hypotension. This action may be additive with other agents that can cause hypotension such as calcium-channel blockers. Patients should be monitored more closely for hypotension if nitroglycerin, including nitroglycerin rectal ointment, is used concurrently with a calcium-channel blocker.
    Apalutamide: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with apalutamide is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and apalutamide is a strong CYP3A4 inducer. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Apomorphine: (Moderate) Use of calcium-channel blockers and apomorphine together can increase the hypotensive effects of apomorphine. Monitor blood pressure regularly during use of this combination.
    Apraclonidine: (Minor) Apraclonidine had minimal effects on heart rate and blood pressure during clinical studies in patients with glaucoma. However, it is theoretically possible that additive blood pressure reductions could occur when apraclonidine is combined with the use of antihypertensive agents. Use caution during concurrent use, especially in patients with severe, uncontrolled cardiovascular disease, including hypertension.
    Aprepitant, Fosaprepitant: (Moderate) Use caution if amlodipine and a multi-day regimen of oral aprepitant are used concurrently; monitor for an increase in amlodipine-related adverse effects for several days after administration. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Aprepitant, when administered as a 3-day oral regimen (125 mg/80 mg/80 mg), is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and inducer and may increase plasma concentrations of amlodipine. For example, a 5-day oral aprepitant regimen increased the AUC of another CYP3A4 substrate, midazolam (single dose), by 2.3-fold on day 1 and by 3.3-fold on day 5. After a 3-day oral aprepitant regimen, the AUC of midazolam (given on days 1, 4, 8, and 15) increased by 25% on day 4, and then decreased by 19% and 4% on days 8 and 15, respectively. As a single 125 mg or 40 mg oral dose, the inhibitory effect of aprepitant on CYP3A4 is weak, with the AUC of midazolam increased by 1.5-fold and 1.2-fold, respectively. After administration, fosaprepitant is rapidly converted to aprepitant and shares many of the same drug interactions. However, as a single 150 mg intravenous dose, fosaprepitant only weakly inhibits CYP3A4 for a duration of 2 days; there is no evidence of CYP3A4 induction. Fosaprepitant 150 mg IV as a single dose increased the AUC of midazolam (given on days 1 and 4) by approximately 1.8-fold on day 1; there was no effect on day 4. Less than a 2-fold increase in the midazolam AUC is not considered clinically important.
    Aripiprazole: (Minor) Aripiprazole may enhance the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents.
    Armodafinil: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as armodafinil are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Articaine; Epinephrine: (Moderate) Antihypertensives, including calcium-channel blockers, antagonize the vasopressor effects of parenteral epinephrine.
    Asenapine: (Moderate) Secondary to alpha-blockade, asenapine can produce vasodilation that may result in additive effects during concurrent use of antihypertensive agents. The potential reduction in blood pressure can precipitate orthostatic hypotension and associated dizziness, tachycardia, and syncope. If concurrent use of asenapine and antihypertensive agents is necessary, patients should be counseled on measures to prevent orthostatic hypotension, such as sitting on the edge of the bed for several minutes prior to standing in the morning and rising slowly from a seated position. Close monitoring of blood pressure is recommended until the full effects of the combination therapy are known.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Moderate) Monitor for an increase in codeine-related adverse reactions including sedation and respiratory depression if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary; adjust the dose of codeine if necessary. Codeine is primarily metabolized by CYP2D6 to morphine, and by CYP3A4 to norcodeine; norcodeine does not have analgesic properties. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. Concomitant use may result in an increase in codeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6 and increased morphine concentrations.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Moderate) Concomitant use of dihydrocodeine with amlodipine may increase dihydrocodeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6, increased dihydromorphine concentrations, and prolonged opioid adverse reactions, including hypotension, respiratory depression, profound sedation, coma, and death. If coadministration is necessary, monitor patients closely at frequent intervals and consider a dosage reduction of dihydrocodeine until stable drug effects are achieved. Discontinuation of amlodipine could decrease dihydrocodeine plasma concentrations, decrease opioid efficacy, and potentially lead to a withdrawal syndrome in those with physical dependence to dihydrocodeine. If amlodipine is discontinued, monitor the patient carefully and consider increasing the opioid dosage if appropriate. Amlodipine is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4, an isoenzyme partially responsible for the metabolism of dihydrocodeine.
    Aspirin, ASA; Carisoprodol; Codeine: (Moderate) Monitor for an increase in codeine-related adverse reactions including sedation and respiratory depression if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary; adjust the dose of codeine if necessary. Codeine is primarily metabolized by CYP2D6 to morphine, and by CYP3A4 to norcodeine; norcodeine does not have analgesic properties. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. Concomitant use may result in an increase in codeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6 and increased morphine concentrations.
    Aspirin, ASA; Oxycodone: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of oxycodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. If amlodipine is discontinued, consider increasing the oxycodone dose until stable drug effects are achieved and monitor for evidence of opioid withdrawal. Oxycodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with a weak inhibitor like amlodipine can increase oxycodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of oxycodone. If amlodipine is discontinued, oxycodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to oxycodone.
    Atazanavir: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Atazanavir; Cobicistat: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted. (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with cobicistat is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Cobicistat is a strong CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Atenolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Atenolol; Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Avanafil: (Moderate) Monitor blood pressure closely during concomitant use of avanafil and amlodipine as coadministration may increase the risk of additive hypotension. Avanafil is a substrate of CYP3A and amlodipine is a CYP3A inhibitor. Coadministration with amlodipine increased the AUC of avanafil by approximately 70% and the half-life was prolonged to approximately 10 hours. A mean maximum decrease in supine systolic blood pressure of 1.2 mmHg (compared to placebo), accompanied by a mean maximum increase in pulse rate of 1 beat per minute was observed.
    Baclofen: (Moderate) Baclofen has been associated with hypotension. Concurrent use with baclofen and antihypertensive agents may result in additive hypotension. Dosage adjustments of the antihypertensive medication may be required.
    Barbiturates: (Major) Barbiturates may induce the CYP3A4 metabolism of calcium-channel blockers such as amlodipine, and thereby reduce their oral bioavailability. The dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased in patients receiving concurrent enzyme inducers; monitor blood pressure closely.
    Belladonna Alkaloids; Ergotamine; Phenobarbital: (Moderate) Be alert for symptoms of ergot toxicity if using ergotamine and amlodipine together is medically necessary. An ergot alkaloid dose reduction may be necessary if these drugs are used together. Concomitant use of amlodipine, a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor, and ergotamine, a CYP3A4 substrate with a narrow therapeutic range, may result in increased ergot alkaloid levels.
    Bendroflumethiazide; Nadolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Benzhydrocodone; Acetaminophen: (Moderate) Concurrent use of benzhydrocodone with amlodipine may increase the risk of increased opioid-related adverse reactions, such as fatal respiratory depression. Consider a dose reduction of benzhydrocodone until stable drug effects are achieved. Monitor patients for respiratory depression and sedation at frequent intervals. Discontinuation of amlodipine in a patient taking benzhydrocodone may decrease hydrocodone plasma concentrations, decrease opioid efficacy, and potentially lead to a withdrawal syndrome in those with physical dependence to opioid agonists. If amlodipine is discontinued, monitor the patient carefully and consider increasing the opioid dosage if appropriate. Benzhydrocodone is a prodrug for hydrocodone. Hydrocodone is a substrate for CYP3A4. Amlodipine is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4.
    Benzphetamine: (Minor) Benzphetamine might increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of some antihypertensive agents, like calcium-channel blockers. Close monitoring of blood pressure is advised.
    Berotralstat: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with berotralstat is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate and berotralstat is a moderate CYP3A inhibitor. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. However, coadministration with another moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in healthy volunteers did not significantly change amlodipine exposure.
    Beta-blockers: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Betaxolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Bexarotene: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as bexarotene, are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Bisoprolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Bisoprolol; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Boceprevir: (Moderate) Close clinical monitoring is advised when administering amlodipine with boceprevir due to an increased potential for amlodipine-related adverse events. A reduction in the dose of amlodipine may be considered. If amlodipine dose adjustments are made, re-adjust the dose upon completion of boceprevir treatment. Predictions about the interaction can be made based on the metabolic pathway of amlodipine. Amlodipine is metabolized by the hepatic isoenzyme CYP3A4; boceprevir inhibits this isoenzyme. Coadministration may result in elevated amlodipine plasma concentrations.
    Bortezomib: (Moderate) Patients on antihypertensive agents receiving bortezomib treatment may require close monitoring of their blood pressure and dosage adjustment of their medication. During clinical trials of bortezomib, hypotension was reported in roughly 12 percent of patients.
    Bosentan: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with bosentan is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and bosentan is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Brimonidine; Timolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Brompheniramine; Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Brompheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Brompheniramine; Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone.
    Brompheniramine; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Brompheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Brompheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Brompheniramine; Pseudoephedrine; Dextromethorphan: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Bupivacaine; Epinephrine: (Moderate) Antihypertensives, including calcium-channel blockers, antagonize the vasopressor effects of parenteral epinephrine.
    Bupivacaine; Lidocaine: (Moderate) Concomitant use of systemic lidocaine and amlodipine may increase lidocaine plasma concentrations by decreasing lidocaine clearance and therefore prolonging the elimination half-life. Monitor for lidocaine toxicity if used together. Lidocaine is a CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 substrate; amlodipine inhibits CYP3A4.
    Bupivacaine; Meloxicam: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Butalbital; Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Codeine: (Moderate) Monitor for an increase in codeine-related adverse reactions including sedation and respiratory depression if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary; adjust the dose of codeine if necessary. Codeine is primarily metabolized by CYP2D6 to morphine, and by CYP3A4 to norcodeine; norcodeine does not have analgesic properties. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. Concomitant use may result in an increase in codeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6 and increased morphine concentrations.
    Cabergoline: (Moderate) Cabergoline should be used cautiously with antihypertensive agents, including amlodipine. Cabergoline has been associated with hypotension. Initial doses higher than 1 mg may produce orthostatic hypotension. It may be advisable to monitor blood pressure.
    Carbamazepine: (Moderate) Monitor for increased carbamazepine adverse reactions if coadministered with amlodipine. Taking these drugs together may increase carbamazepine plasma concentrations, potentially resulting in adverse events. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor; carbamazepine is a substrate of CYP3A4 with a narrow therapeutic index. In addition, carbamazepine may induce the hepatic metabolism of calcium-channel blockers by the CYP3A4 isoenzyme; which reduces the oral bioavailability. The dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased in patients receiving concurrent enzyme inducers.
    Carbetapentane; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Carbetapentane; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Carbetapentane; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine; Pyrilamine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Carbetapentane; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Carbidopa; Levodopa: (Moderate) Concomitant use of antihypertensive agents with levodopa can result in additive hypotensive effects.
    Carbidopa; Levodopa; Entacapone: (Moderate) Concomitant use of antihypertensive agents with levodopa can result in additive hypotensive effects.
    Carbinoxamine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Carbinoxamine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone. (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Carbinoxamine; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Carbinoxamine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Carbinoxamine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Carteolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Carvedilol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Celecoxib: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Celecoxib; Tramadol: (Moderate) Consider a tramadol dosage reduction until stable drug effects are achieved if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary. Closely monitor for seizures, serotonin syndrome, and signs of sedation and respiratory depression. Respiratory depression from increased tramadol exposure may be fatal. Concurrent use of amlodipine, a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor, may increase tramadol exposure and result in greater CYP2D6 metabolism thereby increasing exposure to the active metabolite M1, which is a more potent mu-opioid agonist. (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Cenobamate: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with cenobamate is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and cenobamate is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Ceritinib: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with ceritinib is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Ceritinib is a strong CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Cetirizine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Chlophedianol; Dexchlorpheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Chlophedianol; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Chloramphenicol: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as chloramphenicol, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when chloramphenicol is coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored.
    Chloroprocaine: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents.
    Chlorpheniramine; Codeine: (Moderate) Monitor for an increase in codeine-related adverse reactions including sedation and respiratory depression if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary; adjust the dose of codeine if necessary. Codeine is primarily metabolized by CYP2D6 to morphine, and by CYP3A4 to norcodeine; norcodeine does not have analgesic properties. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. Concomitant use may result in an increase in codeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6 and increased morphine concentrations.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dihydrocodeine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Concomitant use of dihydrocodeine with amlodipine may increase dihydrocodeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6, increased dihydromorphine concentrations, and prolonged opioid adverse reactions, including hypotension, respiratory depression, profound sedation, coma, and death. If coadministration is necessary, monitor patients closely at frequent intervals and consider a dosage reduction of dihydrocodeine until stable drug effects are achieved. Discontinuation of amlodipine could decrease dihydrocodeine plasma concentrations, decrease opioid efficacy, and potentially lead to a withdrawal syndrome in those with physical dependence to dihydrocodeine. If amlodipine is discontinued, monitor the patient carefully and consider increasing the opioid dosage if appropriate. Amlodipine is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4, an isoenzyme partially responsible for the metabolism of dihydrocodeine. (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dihydrocodeine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Concomitant use of dihydrocodeine with amlodipine may increase dihydrocodeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6, increased dihydromorphine concentrations, and prolonged opioid adverse reactions, including hypotension, respiratory depression, profound sedation, coma, and death. If coadministration is necessary, monitor patients closely at frequent intervals and consider a dosage reduction of dihydrocodeine until stable drug effects are achieved. Discontinuation of amlodipine could decrease dihydrocodeine plasma concentrations, decrease opioid efficacy, and potentially lead to a withdrawal syndrome in those with physical dependence to dihydrocodeine. If amlodipine is discontinued, monitor the patient carefully and consider increasing the opioid dosage if appropriate. Amlodipine is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4, an isoenzyme partially responsible for the metabolism of dihydrocodeine. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Chlorpheniramine; Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone. (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Chlorpheniramine; Ibuprofen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Chlorpheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Ciprofloxacin: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with ciprofloxacin is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate and ciprofloxacin is a moderate CYP3A inhibitor. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. However, coadministration with another moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in healthy volunteers did not significantly change amlodipine exposure.
    Cisapride: (Moderate) Use caution when administering amlodipine with cisapride. Taking these drugs together may increase cisapride plasma concentrations, potentially resulting in adverse events. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor; cisapride is a substrate of CYP3A4 with a narrow therapeutic index.
    Clarithromycin: (Major) Avoid coadministration of clarithromycin and amlodipine, particularly in geriatric patients, due to an increased risk of hypotension and acute kidney injury. If the use of a macrolide antibiotic is necessary in a patient receiving amlodipine therapy, azithromycin is the preferred agent. If coadministration is unavoidable, monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and clarithromycin is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor. A retrospective, case crossover study, found the risk of hospitalization due to hypotension or shock to be significantly increased in geriatric patients exposed to clarithromycin during concurrent calcium-channel blocker therapy (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.3-6.1). Concurrent use of azithromycin was not associated with an increased risk of hypotension (OR 1.5, 95% CI 0.8-2.8).
    Clobazam: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as clobazam, are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Clopidogrel: (Moderate) Monitor for reduced therapeutic response to clopidogrel when it is coadministered with amlodipine. Although clopidogrel is primarily converted to its active metabolite via CYP2C19, it has been suggested that calcium channel blocker (CCB)-induced inhibition of CYP3A4 reduces its conversion to the active metabolite, thereby reducing its antiplatelet effect. Because amlodipine has represented the largest subgroup of CCB studied, it is unknown whether this is a class effect. It has been theorized that CCBs that inhibit P-glycoprotein (P-gp) decrease the intestinal efflux of clopidogrel, thereby increasing its plasma concentrations and counteracting the effect of CCB-induced CYP3A4 inhibition. Amlodipine is not a P-gp inhibitor.
    Clozapine: (Moderate) Clozapine used concomitantly with the antihypertensive agents can increase the risk and severity of hypotension by potentiating the effect of the antihypertensive drug.
    Cobicistat: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with cobicistat is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Cobicistat is a strong CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Cocaine: (Major) Use of cocaine with antihypertensive agents may increase the antihypertensive effects of the antihypertensive medications or may potentiate cocaine-induced sympathetic stimulation.
    Codeine: (Moderate) Monitor for an increase in codeine-related adverse reactions including sedation and respiratory depression if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary; adjust the dose of codeine if necessary. Codeine is primarily metabolized by CYP2D6 to morphine, and by CYP3A4 to norcodeine; norcodeine does not have analgesic properties. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. Concomitant use may result in an increase in codeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6 and increased morphine concentrations.
    Codeine; Guaifenesin: (Moderate) Monitor for an increase in codeine-related adverse reactions including sedation and respiratory depression if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary; adjust the dose of codeine if necessary. Codeine is primarily metabolized by CYP2D6 to morphine, and by CYP3A4 to norcodeine; norcodeine does not have analgesic properties. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. Concomitant use may result in an increase in codeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6 and increased morphine concentrations.
    Codeine; Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Monitor for an increase in codeine-related adverse reactions including sedation and respiratory depression if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary; adjust the dose of codeine if necessary. Codeine is primarily metabolized by CYP2D6 to morphine, and by CYP3A4 to norcodeine; norcodeine does not have analgesic properties. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. Concomitant use may result in an increase in codeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6 and increased morphine concentrations. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Codeine; Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Moderate) Monitor for an increase in codeine-related adverse reactions including sedation and respiratory depression if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary; adjust the dose of codeine if necessary. Codeine is primarily metabolized by CYP2D6 to morphine, and by CYP3A4 to norcodeine; norcodeine does not have analgesic properties. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. Concomitant use may result in an increase in codeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6 and increased morphine concentrations. (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Codeine; Promethazine: (Moderate) Monitor for an increase in codeine-related adverse reactions including sedation and respiratory depression if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary; adjust the dose of codeine if necessary. Codeine is primarily metabolized by CYP2D6 to morphine, and by CYP3A4 to norcodeine; norcodeine does not have analgesic properties. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. Concomitant use may result in an increase in codeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6 and increased morphine concentrations.
    Co-Enzyme Q10, Ubiquinone: (Moderate) Co-enzyme Q10, ubiquinone (CoQ10) may lower blood pressure. CoQ10 use in combination with antihypertensive agents may lead to additional reductions in blood pressure in some individuals. Patients who choose to take CoQ10 concurrently with antihypertensive medications should receive periodic blood pressure monitoring. Patients should be advised to inform their prescriber of their use of CoQ10.
    Colchicine: (Moderate) Monitor for an increase in colchicine-related adverse reactions including neuromuscular toxicity and other serious toxicities if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary, especially in patients with renal or hepatic impairment. Amlodipine is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A while colchicine is a CYP3A4 substrate with a narrow therapeutic index.
    Conivaptan: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with conivaptan is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate; conivaptan is a moderate CYP3A inhibitor. Concomitant use of amlodipine and oral conivaptan doubled amlodipine's overall exposure in a drug interaction study.
    Crizotinib: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with crizotinib is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Crizotinib is a moderate CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. However, coadministration with another moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in healthy volunteers did not significantly change amlodipine exposure.
    Cyclosporine: (Moderate) Caution should be used when cyclosporine is coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored, including cyclosporine levels as necessary. Amlodipine may increase cyclosporine concentrations. In one study, whole blood cyclosporine trough concentrations increased from 140.2 +/- 18.2 to 200 +/- 21.9 mcg/L after amlodipine addition. In another study, the systemic exposure (AUC) of cyclosporine increased following the addition of amlodipine, and was decreased in the absence of the drug. The postulated mechanism is the inhibitory effect of amlodipine on the P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux of cyclosporine from intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, amlodipine is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4; cyclosporine is a substrate with a narrow therapeutic index. Also, amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and theoretically, cyclosporine, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals.
    Dabrafenib: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as dabrafenib, are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Danazol: (Moderate) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inhibitors with amlodipine can theoretically decrease the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as danazol , are coadministered with calcium-channel blockers. Monitor therapeutic response; a dose reduction of amlodipine may be required.
    Dantrolene: (Moderate) Concurrent use with skeletal muscle relaxants and antihypertensive agents may result in additive hypotension. Dosage adjustments of the antihypertensive medication may be required.
    Darunavir: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Darunavir; Cobicistat: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted. (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with cobicistat is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Cobicistat is a strong CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Darunavir; Cobicistat; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir alafenamide: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted. (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with cobicistat is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Cobicistat is a strong CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Dasabuvir; Ombitasvir; Paritaprevir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Deferasirox: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as deferasirox, are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Delavirdine: (Moderate) Administering amlodipine with CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as delavirdine, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when delavirdine is coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored.
    Desloratadine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Desogestrel; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Dexamethasone: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as dexamethasone, are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Dexbrompheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Dexchlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Dexmedetomidine: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of dexmedetomidine and calcium-channel blockers could lead to additive hypotension and bradycardia; use together with caution. Dexmedetomidine can produce bradycardia or AV block and should be used cautiously in patients who are receiving antihypertensive drugs that may lower the heart rate such as calcium-channel blockers.
    Dextromethorphan; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Dextromethorphan; Quinidine: (Moderate) Monitor for increased quinidine adverse reactions if coadministered with amlodipine. Taking these drugs together may increase quinidine plasma concentrations, potentially resulting in adverse events. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor; quinidine is a substrate of CYP3A4 with a narrow therapeutic index. In addition, quinidine can decrease blood pressure and should be used cautiously in patients receiving antihypertensive agents due to the potential for additive hypotension.
    Diazoxide: (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects can occur with the concomitant administration of diazoxide with other antihypertensive agents. This interaction can be therapeutically advantageous, but dosages must be adjusted accordingly. The manufacturer advises that IV diazoxide should not be administered to patients within 6 hours of receiving other antihypertensive agents.
    Diclofenac: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Diclofenac; Misoprostol: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Diethylpropion: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of calcium-channel blockers. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Diflunisal: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Dihydrocodeine; Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Concomitant use of dihydrocodeine with amlodipine may increase dihydrocodeine plasma concentrations, resulting in greater metabolism by CYP2D6, increased dihydromorphine concentrations, and prolonged opioid adverse reactions, including hypotension, respiratory depression, profound sedation, coma, and death. If coadministration is necessary, monitor patients closely at frequent intervals and consider a dosage reduction of dihydrocodeine until stable drug effects are achieved. Discontinuation of amlodipine could decrease dihydrocodeine plasma concentrations, decrease opioid efficacy, and potentially lead to a withdrawal syndrome in those with physical dependence to dihydrocodeine. If amlodipine is discontinued, monitor the patient carefully and consider increasing the opioid dosage if appropriate. Amlodipine is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4, an isoenzyme partially responsible for the metabolism of dihydrocodeine. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Dihydroergotamine: (Moderate) Be alert for symptoms of ergot toxicity if using dihydroergotamine and amlodipine together is medically necessary. An ergot alkaloid dose reduction may be necessary if these drugs are used together. Concomitant use of amlodipine, a CYP3A4 inhibitor, and dihydroergotamine, a CYP3A4 substrate with a narrow therapeutic range, may result in increased ergot alkaloid levels.
    Diltiazem: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate; coadministration of diltiazem 180 mg/day PO (CYP3A4 inhibitor) with amlodipine 5 mg/day PO in elderly hypertensive patients resulted in a 60% increase in amlodipine systemic exposure. This effect might lead to hypotension or edema in some individuals. Caution should be used when diltiazem is coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored.
    Diphenhydramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone. (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Diphenhydramine; Ibuprofen: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Diphenhydramine; Naproxen: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Dofetilide: (Moderate) Monitor for an increase in dofetilide-related adverse reactions, including QT prolongation, if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. Dofetilide is a minor CYP3A4 substrate; however, because there is a linear relationship between dofetilide plasma concentration and QTc, concomitant administration of CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the risk of arrhythmia (torsade de pointes).
    Dorzolamide; Timolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Dronabinol: (Moderate) Use caution if coadministration of dronabinol with amlodipine is necessary, and monitor for an increase in dronabinol-related adverse reactions (e.g., feeling high, dizziness, confusion, somnolence). Dronabinol is a CYP2C9 and 3A4 substrate; amlodipine is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4. Concomitant use may result in elevated plasma concentrations of dronabinol.
    Dronedarone: (Moderate) Monitor for evidence of hypotension and edema if amlodipine is coadministered with dronedarone; an amlodipine dose adjustment may be necessary due to increased amlodipine exposure. Dronedarone is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor; amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate.
    Drospirenone; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Drospirenone; Ethinyl Estradiol; Levomefolate: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Duloxetine: (Moderate) Orthostatic hypotension and syncope have been reported during duloxetine administration. The concurrent administration of antihypertensive agents and duloxetine may increase the risk of hypotension. Monitor blood pressure if the combination is necessary.
    Dutasteride; Tamsulosin: (Moderate) The concomitant administration of tamsulosin with other antihypertensive agents can cause additive hypotensive effects. In addition, diltiazem, nicardipine, and verapamil may increase tamsulosin plasma concentrations via CYP3A4 inhibition. This interaction can be therapeutically advantageous, but dosages must be adjusted accordingly.
    Duvelisib: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with duvelisib is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate and duvelisib is a moderate CYP3A inhibitor. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. However, coadministration with another moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in healthy volunteers did not significantly change amlodipine exposure.
    Efavirenz: (Moderate) Monitor blood pressure if amlodipine and efavirenz are used concomitantly. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate; efavirenz induces CYP3A4. In addition, monitor for an increase in efavirenz-related adverse reactions if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary. Efavirenz is a CYP3A4 substrate and amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor; concomitant use may increase plasma concentrations of efavirenz.
    Efavirenz; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir: (Moderate) Monitor blood pressure if amlodipine and efavirenz are used concomitantly. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate; efavirenz induces CYP3A4. In addition, monitor for an increase in efavirenz-related adverse reactions if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary. Efavirenz is a CYP3A4 substrate and amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor; concomitant use may increase plasma concentrations of efavirenz.
    Efavirenz; Lamivudine; Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate: (Moderate) Monitor blood pressure if amlodipine and efavirenz are used concomitantly. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate; efavirenz induces CYP3A4. In addition, monitor for an increase in efavirenz-related adverse reactions if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary. Efavirenz is a CYP3A4 substrate and amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor; concomitant use may increase plasma concentrations of efavirenz.
    Elagolix: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with elagolix is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and elagolix is a weak to moderate CYP3A4 inducer. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Elagolix; Estradiol; Norethindrone acetate: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with elagolix is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and elagolix is a weak to moderate CYP3A4 inducer. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Elbasvir; Grazoprevir: (Moderate) Administering elbasvir; grazoprevir with amlodipine may cause the plasma concentrations of all three drugs to increase; thereby increasing the potential for adverse effects (i.e., elevated ALT concentrations and hepatotoxicity). Amlodipine is a substrate and weak inhibitor of CYP3A. Both elbasvir and grazoprevir are metabolized by CYP3A, and grazoprevir is also a weak CYP3A inhibitor. If these drugs are used together, closely monitor for signs of hepatotoxicity.
    Eliglustat: (Major) In poor CYP2D6 metabolizers (PMs), coadministration of amlodipine and eliglustat is not recommended. In extensive CYP2D6 metabolizers (EM) with mild hepatic impairment, coadministration of these agents requires dosage reduction of eliglustat to 84 mg PO once daily. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A inhibitor; eliglustat is a CYP3A and CYP2D6 substrate. Because CYP3A plays a significant role in the metabolism of eliglustat in CYP2D6 PMs, coadministration with CYP3A inhibitors may increase eliglustat exposure and the risk of serious adverse events (e.g., QT prolongation and cardiac arrhythmias) in these patients.
    Elvitegravir; Cobicistat; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir Alafenamide: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with cobicistat is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Cobicistat is a strong CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Elvitegravir; Cobicistat; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with cobicistat is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Cobicistat is a strong CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Empagliflozin: (Moderate) Administer antidiabetic agents with caution in patients receiving calcium-channel blockers. These drugs may cause hyperglycemia leading to a temporary loss of glycemic control in patients receiving antidiabetic agents. Close observation and monitoring of blood glucose is necessary to maintain adequate glycemic control.
    Empagliflozin; Linagliptin: (Moderate) Administer antidiabetic agents with caution in patients receiving calcium-channel blockers. These drugs may cause hyperglycemia leading to a temporary loss of glycemic control in patients receiving antidiabetic agents. Close observation and monitoring of blood glucose is necessary to maintain adequate glycemic control.
    Empagliflozin; Linagliptin; Metformin: (Moderate) Administer antidiabetic agents with caution in patients receiving calcium-channel blockers. These drugs may cause hyperglycemia leading to a temporary loss of glycemic control in patients receiving antidiabetic agents. Close observation and monitoring of blood glucose is necessary to maintain adequate glycemic control.
    Empagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Administer antidiabetic agents with caution in patients receiving calcium-channel blockers. These drugs may cause hyperglycemia leading to a temporary loss of glycemic control in patients receiving antidiabetic agents. Close observation and monitoring of blood glucose is necessary to maintain adequate glycemic control.
    Enflurane: (Major) The depression of cardiac contractility, conductivity, and automaticity as well as the vascular dilation associated with general anesthetics may be potentiated by calcium-channel blockers. Alternatively, general anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. When used concomitantly, anesthetics and calcium-channel blockers should be titrated carefully to avoid excessive cardiovascular depression.
    Enzalutamide: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with enzalutamide is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and enzalutamide is a strong CYP3A4 inducer. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Ephedrine: (Major) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics, such as ephedrine, may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Blood pressure and heart rates should be monitored closely to confirm that the desired antihypertensive effect is achieved.
    Ephedrine; Guaifenesin: (Major) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics, such as ephedrine, may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Blood pressure and heart rates should be monitored closely to confirm that the desired antihypertensive effect is achieved.
    Epinephrine: (Moderate) Antihypertensives, including calcium-channel blockers, antagonize the vasopressor effects of parenteral epinephrine.
    Epirubicin: (Moderate) Close cardiac monitoring is recommended throughout therapy in patients receiving concomitant therapy with epirubicin and calcium-channel blockers. Individuals receiving these medications together are at increased risk of developing heart failure.
    Eplerenone: (Moderate) Amlodipine can have additive hypotensive effects with other antihypertensive agents. This additive effect can be desirable, but the patient should be monitored carefully and the dosage should be adjusted based on clinical response.
    Epoprostenol: (Moderate) Calcium-channel blockers can have additive hypotensive effects with other antihypertensive agents. This additive effect can be desirable, but the patient should be monitored carefully and the dosage should be adjusted based on clinical response.
    Ergonovine: (Major) Because of its potential to cause coronary vasospasm, ergonovine could theoretically antagonize the therapeutic effects of anti-anginal agents including calcium-channel blockers. In addition, calcium-channel blockers with CYP3A4 inhibitory properties, such as diltiazem, nicardipine, and verapamil, may also reduce the hepatic metabolism of ergonovine and increase the risk of ergot toxicity.
    Ergotamine: (Moderate) Be alert for symptoms of ergot toxicity if using ergotamine and amlodipine together is medically necessary. An ergot alkaloid dose reduction may be necessary if these drugs are used together. Concomitant use of amlodipine, a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor, and ergotamine, a CYP3A4 substrate with a narrow therapeutic range, may result in increased ergot alkaloid levels.
    Ergotamine; Caffeine: (Moderate) Be alert for symptoms of ergot toxicity if using ergotamine and amlodipine together is medically necessary. An ergot alkaloid dose reduction may be necessary if these drugs are used together. Concomitant use of amlodipine, a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor, and ergotamine, a CYP3A4 substrate with a narrow therapeutic range, may result in increased ergot alkaloid levels.
    Erythromycin: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with erythromycin is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate and erythromycin is a moderate CYP3A inhibitor. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. However, coadministration with another moderate CYP3A inhibitor in healthy volunteers did not significantly change amlodipine exposure.
    Erythromycin; Sulfisoxazole: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with erythromycin is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate and erythromycin is a moderate CYP3A inhibitor. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. However, coadministration with another moderate CYP3A inhibitor in healthy volunteers did not significantly change amlodipine exposure.
    Eslicarbazepine: (Minor) In vivo studies suggest eslicarbazepine is an inducer of CYP3A4. Coadministration of CYP3A4 substrates, such as amlodipine, may result in decreased serum concentrations of the substrates. Monitor for potential reduced cholesterol-lowering and hypotensive efficacy when these drugs are coadministered with eslicarbazepine. Appropriate dose adjustments may be necessary.
    Esmolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Estradiol Cypionate; Medroxyprogesterone: (Minor) Estrogens can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients; patients who are receiving antihypertensive agents concurrently with hormonal contraceptives should be monitored for antihypertensive effectiveness.
    Estradiol: (Minor) Estrogens can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients; patients who are receiving antihypertensive agents concurrently with hormonal contraceptives should be monitored for antihypertensive effectiveness.
    Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Levonorgestrel; Folic Acid; Levomefolate: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norelgestromin: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norethindrone Acetate: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norgestrel: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Ethosuximide: (Moderate) Monitor for increased ethosuximide adverse reactions if coadministered with amlodipine. Taking these drugs together may increase ethosuximide plasma concentrations, potentially resulting in adverse events. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor; ethosuximide is a substrate of CYP3A4 with a narrow therapeutic index.
    Ethotoin: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with hydantoins is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and hydantoins are strong CYP3A4 inducers. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Ethynodiol Diacetate; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Etodolac: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Etomidate: (Major) The depression of cardiac contractility, conductivity, and automaticity as well as the vascular dilation associated with general anesthetics may be potentiated by calcium-channel blockers. Alternatively, general anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. When used concomitantly, anesthetics and calcium-channel blockers should be titrated carefully to avoid excessive cardiovascular depression.
    Etonogestrel; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Etravirine: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as etravirine, are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Ezetimibe; Simvastatin: (Major) Do not exceed a simvastatin dose of 20 mg/day in patients taking amlodipine due to increased risk of myopathy, including rhabdomyolysis. For patients chronically receiving simvastatin 80 mg/day who need to be started on amlodipine, consider switching to an alternative statin with less potential for interaction. Carefully weigh the benefits of combined use of amlodipine and simvastatin against the potential risks. Amlodipine increases the simvastatin exposure by approximately 1.5-fold.
    Famotidine; Ibuprofen: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Fedratinib: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with fedratinib is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Fedratinib is a moderate CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. However, coadministration with another moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in healthy volunteers did not significantly change amlodipine exposure.
    Fenoprofen: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Fentanyl: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of fentanyl with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. If amlodipine is discontinued, consider increasing the fentanyl dose until stable drug effects are achieved and monitor for evidence of opioid withdrawal. Fentanyl is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase fentanyl exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of fentanyl. If amlodipine is discontinued, fentanyl plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to fentanyl.
    Fexofenadine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Finerenone: (Moderate) Monitor serum potassium during initiation or dose adjustment of either finerenone or amlodipine; a finerenone dosage reduction may be necessary. Concomitant use may increase finerenone exposure and the risk of hyperkalemia. Finerenone is a CYP3A substrate and amlodipine is a weak CYP3A inhibitor. Coadministration with another weak CYP3A inhibitor increased overall exposure to finerenone by 21%.
    Fish Oil, Omega-3 Fatty Acids (Dietary Supplements): (Moderate) High doses of fish oil supplements may produce a blood pressure lowering effect. It is possible that additive reductions in blood pressure may be seen when fish oils are used in a patient already taking antihypertensive agents.
    Fluconazole: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with fluconazole is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate and fluconazole is a moderate CYP3A inhibitor. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. However, coadministration with another moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in healthy volunteers did not significantly change amlodipine exposure.
    Fluoxetine: (Moderate) Administering amlodipine with CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when fluoxetine is coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored.
    Flurbiprofen: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Flutamide: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as flutamide, are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Fluvoxamine: (Moderate) A dose reduction of amlodipine may be required during coadministration of fluvoxamine. Administering amlodipine with CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as fluvoxamine, may increase plasma concentrations of amlodipine, which might lead to hypotension and peripheral edema in some individuals.
    Fosamprenavir: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Fosphenytoin: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with hydantoins is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and hydantoins are strong CYP3A4 inducers. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Fospropofol: (Major) The depression of cardiac contractility, conductivity, and automaticity as well as the vascular dilation associated with general anesthetics may be potentiated by calcium-channel blockers. Alternatively, general anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. When used concomitantly, anesthetics and calcium-channel blockers should be titrated carefully to avoid excessive cardiovascular depression.
    General anesthetics: (Major) The depression of cardiac contractility, conductivity, and automaticity as well as the vascular dilation associated with general anesthetics may be potentiated by calcium-channel blockers. Alternatively, general anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. When used concomitantly, anesthetics and calcium-channel blockers should be titrated carefully to avoid excessive cardiovascular depression.
    Ginkgo, Ginkgo biloba: (Moderate) Ginkgo biloba appears to inhibit the metabolism of calcium-channel blockers, perhaps by inhibiting the CYP3A4 isoenzyme. A non-controlled pharmacokinetic study in healthy volunteers found that the concurrent administration of ginkgo with nifedipine resulted in a 53% increase in nifedipine peak concentrations. More study is needed regarding ginkgo's effects on CYP3A4 and whether clinically significant drug interactions result.
    Ginseng, Panax ginseng: (Moderate) Ginseng appears to inhibit the metabolism of calcium-channel blockers, perhaps by inhibiting the CYP3A4 isoenzyme. A non-controlled pharmacokinetic study in healthy volunteers found that the concurrent administration of ginseng with nifedipine resulted in a 30% increase in nifedipine peak concentrations. More study is needed regarding ginseng's effects on CYP3A4 and whether clinically significant drug interactions result.
    Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone.
    Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Haloperidol: (Moderate) In general, antipsychotics like haloperidol should be used cautiously with antihypertensive agents due to the possibility of additive hypotension.
    Halothane: (Major) The depression of cardiac contractility, conductivity, and automaticity as well as the vascular dilation associated with general anesthetics may be potentiated by calcium-channel blockers. Alternatively, general anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. When used concomitantly, anesthetics and calcium-channel blockers should be titrated carefully to avoid excessive cardiovascular depression.
    Homatropine; Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone.
    Hydantoins: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with hydantoins is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and hydantoins are strong CYP3A4 inducers. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Hydralazine; Isosorbide Dinitrate, ISDN: (Moderate) Nitroglycerin can cause hypotension. This action may be additive with other agents that can cause hypotension such as calcium-channel blockers. Patients should be monitored more closely for hypotension if nitroglycerin, including nitroglycerin rectal ointment, is used concurrently with a calcium-channel blocker.
    Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone.
    Hydrocodone; Ibuprofen: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone. (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone. (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Hydrocodone; Potassium Guaiacolsulfonate: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone.
    Hydrocodone; Potassium Guaiacolsulfonate; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of hydrocodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. It is recommended to avoid this combination when hydrocodone is being used for cough. Hydrocodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with CYP3A4 inhibitors like amlodipine can increase hydrocodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of hydrocodone. These effects could be more pronounced in patients also receiving a CYP2D6 inhibitor. If amlodipine is discontinued, hydrocodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to hydrocodone. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Ibuprofen: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Ibuprofen; Oxycodone: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of oxycodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. If amlodipine is discontinued, consider increasing the oxycodone dose until stable drug effects are achieved and monitor for evidence of opioid withdrawal. Oxycodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with a weak inhibitor like amlodipine can increase oxycodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of oxycodone. If amlodipine is discontinued, oxycodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to oxycodone. (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Ibuprofen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Idelalisib: (Moderate) Coadministration of idelalisib with amlodipine may increase the systemic exposure of amlodipine resulting in amlodipine-related adverse events. Consider an amlodipine dose reduction if these agents are administered together and monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema.
    Iloperidone: (Moderate) Secondary to alpha-blockade, iloperidone can produce vasodilation that may result in additive effects during concurrent use with antihypertensive agents. The potential reduction in blood pressure can precipitate orthostatic hypotension and associated dizziness, tachycardia, and syncope. If concurrent use of iloperidone and antihypertensive agents is necessary, patients should be counseled on measures to prevent orthostatic hypotension, such as sitting on the edge of the bed for several minutes prior to standing in the morning and rising slowly from a seated position. Close monitoring of blood pressure is recommended until the full effects of the combination therapy are known.
    Iloprost: (Moderate) Calcium-channel blockers can have additive hypotensive effects with other antihypertensive agents. This additive effect can be desirable, but the patient should be monitored carefully and the dosage should be adjusted based on clinical response.
    Imatinib: (Moderate) Administering amlodipine with CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as imatinib, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when imatinib is coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored.
    Indinavir: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Indomethacin: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Intravenous Lipid Emulsions: (Moderate) High doses of fish oil supplements may produce a blood pressure lowering effect. It is possible that additive reductions in blood pressure may be seen when fish oils are used in a patient already taking antihypertensive agents.
    Isavuconazonium: (Moderate) Concomitant use of isavuconazonium with amlodipine may result in increased serum concentrations of amlodipine. Amlodipine is a substrate of the hepatic isoenzyme CYP3A4; isavuconazole, the active moiety of isavuconazonium, is a moderate inhibitor of this enzyme. Caution and close monitoring are advised if these drugs are used together.
    Isocarboxazid: (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects may be seen when monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are combined with antihypertensives. Careful monitoring of blood pressure is suggested during concurrent therapy of MAOIs with calcium-channel blockers. Patients should be instructed to rise slowly from a sitting position, and to report syncope or changes in blood pressure or heart rate to their health care provider.
    Isoflurane: (Major) The depression of cardiac contractility, conductivity, and automaticity as well as the vascular dilation associated with general anesthetics may be potentiated by calcium-channel blockers. Alternatively, general anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. When used concomitantly, anesthetics and calcium-channel blockers should be titrated carefully to avoid excessive cardiovascular depression.
    Isoniazid, INH; Pyrazinamide, PZA; Rifampin: (Moderate) Rifampin is a potent inducer of the cytochrome P450 hepatic enzyme system and can reduce the plasma concentrations and possibly the efficacy of calcium-channel blockers. The dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased in patients receiving concurrent enzyme inducers.
    Isoniazid, INH; Rifampin: (Moderate) Rifampin is a potent inducer of the cytochrome P450 hepatic enzyme system and can reduce the plasma concentrations and possibly the efficacy of calcium-channel blockers. The dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased in patients receiving concurrent enzyme inducers.
    Isoproterenol: (Moderate) The pharmacologic effects of isoproterenol may cause an increase in blood pressure. If isoproterenol is used concomitantly with antihypertensives, the blood pressure should be monitored as the administration of isoproterenol can compromise the effectiveness of antihypertensive agents.
    Isosorbide Dinitrate, ISDN: (Moderate) Nitroglycerin can cause hypotension. This action may be additive with other agents that can cause hypotension such as calcium-channel blockers. Patients should be monitored more closely for hypotension if nitroglycerin, including nitroglycerin rectal ointment, is used concurrently with a calcium-channel blocker.
    Isosorbide Mononitrate: (Moderate) Nitroglycerin can cause hypotension. This action may be additive with other agents that can cause hypotension such as calcium-channel blockers. Patients should be monitored more closely for hypotension if nitroglycerin, including nitroglycerin rectal ointment, is used concurrently with a calcium-channel blocker.
    Itraconazole: (Moderate) Calcium-channel blockers can have a negative inotropic effect that may be additive to those of itraconazole. In addition, itraconazole may increase amlodipine serum concentrations via inhibition of CYP3A4 with the potential for amlodipine toxicity. Edema has been reported in patients receiving concomitantly itraconazole and amlodipine, therefore, caution is recommended when administering these medications in combination. A dosage reduction of the calcium-channel blocker may be appropriate.
    Ketamine: (Major) The depression of cardiac contractility, conductivity, and automaticity as well as the vascular dilation associated with general anesthetics may be potentiated by calcium-channel blockers. Alternatively, general anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. When used concomitantly, anesthetics and calcium-channel blockers should be titrated carefully to avoid excessive cardiovascular depression.
    Ketoconazole: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with ketoconazole is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate and ketoconazole is a strong CYP3A inhibitor. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Ketoprofen: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Ketorolac: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Labetalol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Lacosamide: (Moderate) Use lacosamide with caution in patients taking concomitant medications that affect cardiac conduction, such as calcium-channel blockers, because of the risk of AV block, bradycardia, or ventricular tachyarrhythmia. If use together is necessary, obtain an ECG prior to lacosamide initiation and after treatment has been titrated to steady-state. In addition, monitor patients receiving lacosamide via the intravenous route closely.
    Lanreotide: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of bradycardia-inducing drugs (e.g., calcium-channel blockers) may have an additive effect on the reduction of heart rate associated with lanreotide. Adjust the calcium-channel blocker dose if necessary.
    Lansoprazole; Amoxicillin; Clarithromycin: (Major) Avoid coadministration of clarithromycin and amlodipine, particularly in geriatric patients, due to an increased risk of hypotension and acute kidney injury. If the use of a macrolide antibiotic is necessary in a patient receiving amlodipine therapy, azithromycin is the preferred agent. If coadministration is unavoidable, monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and clarithromycin is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor. A retrospective, case crossover study, found the risk of hospitalization due to hypotension or shock to be significantly increased in geriatric patients exposed to clarithromycin during concurrent calcium-channel blocker therapy (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.3-6.1). Concurrent use of azithromycin was not associated with an increased risk of hypotension (OR 1.5, 95% CI 0.8-2.8).
    Lansoprazole; Naproxen: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Lasmiditan: (Moderate) Monitor heart rate if lasmiditan is coadministered with calcium-channel blockers as concurrent use may increase the risk for bradycardia. Lasmiditan has been associated with lowering of heart rate. In a drug interaction study, addition of a single 200 mg dose of lasmiditan to another heart rate lowering drug decreased heart rate by an additional 5 beats per minute.
    Lefamulin: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with oral lefamulin is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and oral lefamulin is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor; an interaction is not expected with intravenous lefamulin. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. However, coadministration with another moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in healthy volunteers did not significantly change amlodipine exposure.
    Lesinurad: (Moderate) Lesinurad may decrease the systemic exposure and therapeutic efficacy of amlodipine; monitor blood pressure closely. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate, and lesinurad is a weak CYP3A inducer.
    Lesinurad; Allopurinol: (Moderate) Lesinurad may decrease the systemic exposure and therapeutic efficacy of amlodipine; monitor blood pressure closely. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate, and lesinurad is a weak CYP3A inducer.
    Letermovir: (Moderate) Amlodipine dose reductions may be required during concurrent administration with letermovir; monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema to determine the need for dose adjustment. The magnitude of this interaction may be increased in patients who are also receiving cyclosporine. Administering these drugs together may increase amlodipine concentration and risk for adverse events. Amlodipine is a substrate of CYP3A4. Letermovir is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor; however, when given with cyclosporine, the combined effect on CYP3A4 substrates may be similar to a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor. Concurrent administration with a moderate CYP3A inhibitor increased amlodipine exposure by 60%; however, another moderate inhibitor did not significantly change amlodipine exposure. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase amlodipine exposure to a greater extent.
    Levobetaxolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Levobunolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Levodopa: (Moderate) Concomitant use of antihypertensive agents with levodopa can result in additive hypotensive effects.
    Levoketoconazole: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with ketoconazole is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate and ketoconazole is a strong CYP3A inhibitor. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Levonorgestrel; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Levonorgestrel; Ethinyl Estradiol; Ferrous Bisglycinate: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Lidocaine: (Moderate) Concomitant use of systemic lidocaine and amlodipine may increase lidocaine plasma concentrations by decreasing lidocaine clearance and therefore prolonging the elimination half-life. Monitor for lidocaine toxicity if used together. Lidocaine is a CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 substrate; amlodipine inhibits CYP3A4.
    Lidocaine; Epinephrine: (Moderate) Antihypertensives, including calcium-channel blockers, antagonize the vasopressor effects of parenteral epinephrine. (Moderate) Concomitant use of systemic lidocaine and amlodipine may increase lidocaine plasma concentrations by decreasing lidocaine clearance and therefore prolonging the elimination half-life. Monitor for lidocaine toxicity if used together. Lidocaine is a CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 substrate; amlodipine inhibits CYP3A4.
    Lidocaine; Prilocaine: (Moderate) Concomitant use of systemic lidocaine and amlodipine may increase lidocaine plasma concentrations by decreasing lidocaine clearance and therefore prolonging the elimination half-life. Monitor for lidocaine toxicity if used together. Lidocaine is a CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 substrate; amlodipine inhibits CYP3A4.
    Lisdexamfetamine: (Minor) Lisdexamfetamine might increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of some antihypertensive agents, like calcium-channel blockers. Close monitoring of blood pressure is advised.
    Lithium: (Moderate) Lithium neurotoxicity has been reported during co-administration of lithium and verapamil or diltiazem, and is possible during concurrent use of other calcium-channel blockers with lithium. Symptoms of toxicity have included ataxia, tremors, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and tinnitus. The interaction between verapamil and lithium is variable and unpredictable. Both decreased lithium concentrations and lithium toxicity have been reported after the addition of verapamil. The possibility of a loss of lithium's therapeutic effect due to lower serum lithium concentrations may be offset somewhat by the fact that calcium-channel blocking agents share some neuropharmacological actions with lithium; limited data suggest that oral verapamil is effective in controlling an acute manic episode either as a single agent or in combination with lithium. Regarding diltiazem, although neurotoxicity was reported after the addition of diltiazem, other drugs were administered concomitantly. Worsened psychosis has been reported with the combination of diltiazem and lithium. Until more data are available, diltiazem and verapamil should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium.
    Lomitapide: (Major) Concomitant use of lomitapide and amlodipine may significantly increase the serum concentration of lomitapide. Therefore, the lomitapide dose should not exceed 30 mg/day PO during concurrent use. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor; the exposure to lomitapide is increased by approximately 2-fold in the presence of weak CYP3A4 inhibitors.
    Lonafarnib: (Major) Avoid coadministration of lonafarnib and amlodipine; concurrent use may increase the exposure of both drugs and the risk of adverse effects. If coadministration is unavoidable, reduce to or continue lonafarnib at a dosage of 115 mg/m2 and closely monitor patients for lonafarnib-related adverse reactions and/or symptoms of hypotension and edema; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Resume previous lonafarnib dosage 14 days after discontinuing amlodipine. Lonafarnib is a sensitive CYP3A4 substrate and strong CYP3A4 inhibitor; amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and weak CYP3A4 inhibitor.
    Loperamide: (Moderate) The plasma concentration of loperamide, a CYP3A4 substrate, may be increased when administered concurrently with amlodipine, a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4. If these drugs are used together, monitor for loperamide-associated adverse reactions, such as CNS effects and cardiac toxicities (i.e., syncope, ventricular tachycardia, QT prolongation, torsade de pointes, cardiac arrest).
    Loperamide; Simethicone: (Moderate) The plasma concentration of loperamide, a CYP3A4 substrate, may be increased when administered concurrently with amlodipine, a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4. If these drugs are used together, monitor for loperamide-associated adverse reactions, such as CNS effects and cardiac toxicities (i.e., syncope, ventricular tachycardia, QT prolongation, torsade de pointes, cardiac arrest).
    Lopinavir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Loratadine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Lorlatinib: (Moderate) Monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with lorlatinib is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and lorlatinib is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer. Concomitant use may decrease amlodipine plasma concentrations, decreasing efficacy.
    Lovastatin: (Moderate) Carefully weigh the benefits of combined use of amlodipine and lovastatin against the potential risks. Lovastatin exposure may increase resulting in increased risk of myopathy/rhabdomyolysis. Although FDA-approved labeling for amlodipine or lovastatin do not suggest dose adjustments, guidelines recommend limiting the dose of lovastatin to 20 mg/day if combined with amlodipine. Lovastatin is a CYP3A4 substrate; amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor.
    Lovastatin; Niacin: (Moderate) Carefully weigh the benefits of combined use of amlodipine and lovastatin against the potential risks. Lovastatin exposure may increase resulting in increased risk of myopathy/rhabdomyolysis. Although FDA-approved labeling for amlodipine or lovastatin do not suggest dose adjustments, guidelines recommend limiting the dose of lovastatin to 20 mg/day if combined with amlodipine. Lovastatin is a CYP3A4 substrate; amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. (Moderate) Cutaneous vasodilation induced by niacin may become problematic if high-dose niacin is used concomitantly with other antihypertensive agents, especially calcium-channel blockers. This effect is of particular concern in the setting of acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or other acute hemodynamic compromise.
    Lumacaftor; Ivacaftor: (Moderate) Lumacaftor; ivacaftor may decrease the systemic exposure and therapeutic efficacy of amlodipine. If used together, monitor blood pressure closely; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Lumacaftor is a strong CYP3A inducer.
    Lumacaftor; Ivacaftor: (Moderate) Lumacaftor; ivacaftor may decrease the systemic exposure and therapeutic efficacy of amlodipine. If used together, monitor blood pressure closely; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Lumacaftor is a strong CYP3A inducer.
    Lurasidone: (Moderate) Due to the antagonism of lurasidone at alpha-1 adrenergic receptors, the drug may enhance the hypotensive effects of alpha-blockers and other antihypertensive agents. If concurrent use of lurasidone and antihypertensive agents is necessary, patients should be counseled on measures to prevent orthostatic hypotension, such as sitting on the edge of the bed for several minutes prior to standing in the morning and rising slowly from a seated position. Close monitoring of blood pressure is recommended until the full effects of the combination therapy are known.
    Maraviroc: (Minor) Use caution if coadministration of maraviroc with amlodipine is necessary, due to a possible increase in maraviroc exposure. Maraviroc is a CYP3A substrate and amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor. Monitor for an increase in adverse effects with concomitant use.
    Meclofenamate Sodium: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Mefenamic Acid: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Melatonin: (Moderate) Melatonin may impair the efficacy of some calcium-channel blockers, and caution is advised with concurrent use. In one placebo-controlled study, melatonin evening ingestion led to significant increases in blood pressure (6.5 mmHg systolic and 4.9 mmHg diastolic) and heart rate (3.9 bpm) throughout the day in patients taking nifedipine (GITS formulation). Melatonin appeared to antagonize the antihypertensive effects of nifedipine. The mechanism of this interaction is unclear. It may be prudent to avoid melatonin use during calcium-channel blocker therapy.
    Meloxicam: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Mestranol; Norethindrone: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients; monitor patients receiving concurrent therapy to confirm that the desired antihypertensive effect is being obtained.
    Methadone: (Moderate) Frequently monitor for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary; consider reducing the dose of methadone if clinically appropriate. If amlodipine is discontinued, monitor for evidence of opioid withdrawal; consider increasing the methadone dose if needed. Methadone is a CYP3A4 substrate; coadministration with a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor like amlodipine can increase methadone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of methadone. If amlodipine is discontinued, methadone plasma concentrations may decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to methadone.
    Methamphetamine: (Minor) Amphetamines increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of some antihypertensive agents, like calcium-channel blockers. Close monitoring of blood pressure is advised.
    Methoxsalen: (Minor) Preclinical data suggest that calcium-channel blockers could decrease the efficacy of photosensitizing agents used in photodynamic therapy.
    Methylergonovine: (Moderate) Be alert for symptoms of ergot toxicity if using methylergonovine and amlodipine together is medically necessary. An ergot alkaloid dose reduction may be necessary if these drugs are used together. Concomitant use of amlodipine, a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor, and methylergonovine, a CYP3A4 substrate, may result in increased ergot alkaloid levels.
    Methylphenidate Derivatives: (Moderate) Periodic evaluation of blood pressure is advisable during concurrent use of methylphenidate derivatives and antihypertensive agents, particularly during initial coadministration and after dosage increases of methylphenidate derivatives. Methylphenidate derivatives can reduce the hypotensive effect of antihypertensive agents, including calcium-channel blockers.
    Methysergide: (Major) Because of the potential to cause coronary vasospasm , methysergide theoretically could antagonize the therapeutic effects of calcium-channel blockers. Clinicians should also note that calcium-channel blockers with CYP3A4 inhibitory properties, such as diltiazem, nicardipine, verapamil, may also reduce the hepatic metabolism of selected ergot alkaloids and increase the risk of ergot toxicity.
    Metoprolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Metoprolol; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Mifepristone: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with mifepristone is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate and mifepristone is a strong CYP3A inhibitor. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Milrinone: (Moderate) Concurrent administration of antihypertensive agents could lead to additive hypotension when administered with milrinone. Titrate milrinone dosage according to hemodynamic response.
    Mitotane: (Moderate) Use caution if mitotane and amlodipine are used concomitantly, and monitor for decreased efficacy of amlodipine and a possible change in dosage requirements. Mitotane is a strong CYP3A4 inducer and amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate; coadministration may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Modafinil: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as modafinil are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Nabumetone: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Nadolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Nafcillin: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as nafcillin, are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Sirolimus: (Major) Reduce the nab-sirolimus dose to 56 mg/m2 if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary. The dose of sirolimus may also need to be reduced with coadministration of amlodipine. Monitor sirolimus serum concentrations as appropriate and watch for sirolimus-related adverse reactions with coadministration of amlodipine. Sirolimus is a sensitive CYP3A substrate with a narrow therapeutic range; amlodipine is a weak CYP3A inhibitor.
    Naproxen: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Naproxen; Esomeprazole: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Naproxen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Nebivolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Nebivolol; Valsartan: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Nefazodone: (Moderate) Administering amlodipine with CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as nefazodone, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when nefazodone is coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored.
    Nelfinavir: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Nesiritide, BNP: (Major) The potential for hypotension may be increased when coadministering nesiritide with antihypertensive agents.
    Netupitant, Fosnetupitant; Palonosetron: (Moderate) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inhibitors with amlodipine can theoretically decrease the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as netupitant, are coadministered with calcium-channel blockers. Monitor therapeutic response; a dose reduction of amlodipine; valsartan may be required.
    Neuromuscular blockers: (Moderate) Concomitant use of neuromuscular blockers and calcium-channel blockers may prolong neuromuscular blockade.
    Nevirapine: (Minor) Nevirapine is an inducer of the cytochrome P4503A enzyme. Concomitant administration of nevirapine with drugs that are extensively metabolized by this enzyme, including calcium-channel blockers may require dosage adjustments.
    Niacin, Niacinamide: (Moderate) Cutaneous vasodilation induced by niacin may become problematic if high-dose niacin is used concomitantly with other antihypertensive agents, especially calcium-channel blockers. This effect is of particular concern in the setting of acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or other acute hemodynamic compromise.
    Niacin; Simvastatin: (Major) Do not exceed a simvastatin dose of 20 mg/day in patients taking amlodipine due to increased risk of myopathy, including rhabdomyolysis. For patients chronically receiving simvastatin 80 mg/day who need to be started on amlodipine, consider switching to an alternative statin with less potential for interaction. Carefully weigh the benefits of combined use of amlodipine and simvastatin against the potential risks. Amlodipine increases the simvastatin exposure by approximately 1.5-fold. (Moderate) Cutaneous vasodilation induced by niacin may become problematic if high-dose niacin is used concomitantly with other antihypertensive agents, especially calcium-channel blockers. This effect is of particular concern in the setting of acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or other acute hemodynamic compromise.
    Nilotinib: (Moderate) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inhibitors with amlodipine can theoretically decrease the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as nilotinib, are coadministered with calcium-channel blockers. Monitor therapeutic response; a dose reduction of amlodipine may be required.
    Nirmatrelvir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Nitrates: (Moderate) Nitroglycerin can cause hypotension. This action may be additive with other agents that can cause hypotension such as calcium-channel blockers. Patients should be monitored more closely for hypotension if nitroglycerin, including nitroglycerin rectal ointment, is used concurrently with a calcium-channel blocker.
    Nitroglycerin: (Moderate) Nitroglycerin can cause hypotension. This action may be additive with other agents that can cause hypotension such as calcium-channel blockers. Patients should be monitored more closely for hypotension if nitroglycerin, including nitroglycerin rectal ointment, is used concurrently with a calcium-channel blocker.
    Nitroprusside: (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects may occur when nitroprusside is used concomitantly with other antihypertensive agents. Dosages should be adjusted carefully, according to blood pressure.
    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Norethindrone Acetate; Ethinyl Estradiol; Ferrous fumarate: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Norethindrone; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Norethindrone; Ethinyl Estradiol; Ferrous fumarate: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Norgestimate; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Octreotide: (Moderate) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inhibitors with amlodipine can theoretically decrease the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as octreotide, are coadministered with calcium-channel blockers. Monitor therapeutic response; a dose reduction of amlodipine may be required.
    Olanzapine: (Moderate) Olanzapine may induce orthostatic hypotension and thus enhance the effects of antihypertensive agents.
    Olanzapine; Fluoxetine: (Moderate) Administering amlodipine with CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when fluoxetine is coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. (Moderate) Olanzapine may induce orthostatic hypotension and thus enhance the effects of antihypertensive agents.
    Olanzapine; Samidorphan: (Moderate) Olanzapine may induce orthostatic hypotension and thus enhance the effects of antihypertensive agents.
    Ombitasvir; Paritaprevir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Omeprazole; Amoxicillin; Rifabutin: (Moderate) Rifabutin may induce the CYP3A4 metabolism of calcium-channel blockers such as amlodipine and thereby reduce their oral bioavailability. The dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased in patients receiving concurrent enzyme inducers.
    Oritavancin: (Moderate) Amlodipine is metabolized by CYP3A4; oritavancin is a weak CYP3A4 inducer. Plasma concentrations and efficacy of amlodipine may be reduced if these drugs are administered concurrently.
    Oxaprozin: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Oxcarbazepine: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as oxcarbazepine, are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Oxycodone: (Moderate) Consider a reduced dose of oxycodone with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. If amlodipine is discontinued, consider increasing the oxycodone dose until stable drug effects are achieved and monitor for evidence of opioid withdrawal. Oxycodone is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with a weak inhibitor like amlodipine can increase oxycodone exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of oxycodone. If amlodipine is discontinued, oxycodone plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to oxycodone.
    Oxymetazoline: (Major) The vasoconstricting actions of oxymetazoline, an alpha adrenergic agonist, may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. If these drugs are used together, closely monitor for changes in blood pressure.
    Paliperidone: (Moderate) Paliperidone may cause orthostatic hypotension, thereby enhancing the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents. Orthostatic vital signs should be monitored in patients receiving paliperidone and calcium-channel blockers who are susceptible to hypotension.
    Pasireotide: (Major) Pasireotide may cause a decrease in heart rate. Closely monitor patients who are also taking drugs associated with bradycardia such as calcium-channel blockers. Dose adjustments of calcium-channel blockers may be necessary.
    Pazopanib: (Moderate) Pazopanib is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4. Coadministration of pazopanib and amlodipine, a CYP3A4 substrate, may cause an increase in systemic concentrations of amlodipine. Use caution when administering these drugs concomitantly.
    Penbutolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Pentoxifylline: (Moderate) Pentoxifylline has been used concurrently with antihypertensive drugs (beta blockers, diuretics) without observed problems. Small decreases in blood pressure have been observed in some patients treated with pentoxifylline; periodic systemic blood pressure monitoring is recommended for patients receiving concomitant antihypertensives. If indicated, dosage of the antihypertensive agents should be reduced.
    Perampanel: (Moderate) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as perampanel, are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Pexidartinib: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with pexidartinib is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and pexidartinib is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Phenelzine: (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects may be seen when monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are combined with antihypertensives. Careful monitoring of blood pressure is suggested during concurrent therapy of MAOIs with calcium-channel blockers. Patients should be instructed to rise slowly from a sitting position, and to report syncope or changes in blood pressure or heart rate to their health care provider.
    Phentermine; Topiramate: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as topiramate, are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Phenytoin: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with hydantoins is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and hydantoins are strong CYP3A4 inducers. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Photosensitizing agents (topical): (Minor) Preclinical data suggest that calcium-channel blockers could decrease the efficacy of photosensitizing agents used in photodynamic therapy.
    Pindolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Piroxicam: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Posaconazole: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with posaconazole is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Posaconazole is a strong CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Prazosin: (Moderate) Prazosin is well-known to produce a 'first-dose' phenomenon. Some patients develop significant hypotension shortly after administration of the first dose. The first dose response (acute postural hypotension) of prazosin may be exaggerated in patients who are receiving beta-adrenergic blockers, diuretics, or other antihypertensive agents. Concomitant administration of prazosin with other antihypertensive agents is not prohibited, however. This can be therapeutically advantageous, but lower dosages of each agent should be used. The use of alpha-blockers with verapamil can lead to excessive hypotension; In addition, verapamil has been reported to increase the AUC and Cmax of prazosin.
    Prilocaine; Epinephrine: (Moderate) Antihypertensives, including calcium-channel blockers, antagonize the vasopressor effects of parenteral epinephrine.
    Probenecid; Colchicine: (Moderate) Monitor for an increase in colchicine-related adverse reactions including neuromuscular toxicity and other serious toxicities if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary, especially in patients with renal or hepatic impairment. Amlodipine is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A while colchicine is a CYP3A4 substrate with a narrow therapeutic index.
    Procainamide: (Moderate) Procainamide can decrease blood pressure and should be used cautiously in patients receiving antihypertensive agents. Intravenous administration of procainamide is more likely to cause hypotensive effects.
    Procaine: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents.
    Promethazine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Phenylephrine's cardiovascular effects may reduce the antihypertensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear to be at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure; however, increased blood pressure (especially systolic hypertension) has been reported in some patients.
    Propofol: (Major) The depression of cardiac contractility, conductivity, and automaticity as well as the vascular dilation associated with general anesthetics may be potentiated by calcium-channel blockers. Alternatively, general anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. When used concomitantly, anesthetics and calcium-channel blockers should be titrated carefully to avoid excessive cardiovascular depression.
    Propoxyphene: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as propoxyphene, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when propoxyphene is coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored.
    Propranolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Propranolol; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Protease inhibitors: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Pseudoephedrine; Triprolidine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of pseudoephedrine may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by calcium-channel blockers. Monitor blood pressure and heart rate.
    Quinidine: (Moderate) Monitor for increased quinidine adverse reactions if coadministered with amlodipine. Taking these drugs together may increase quinidine plasma concentrations, potentially resulting in adverse events. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor; quinidine is a substrate of CYP3A4 with a narrow therapeutic index. In addition, quinidine can decrease blood pressure and should be used cautiously in patients receiving antihypertensive agents due to the potential for additive hypotension.
    Quinine: (Moderate) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inhibitors with amlodipine can theoretically decrease the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as quinine, are coadministered with calcium-channel blockers. Monitor therapeutic response; a dose reduction of amlodipine may be required.
    Rasagiline: (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects may be seen when monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are combined with antihypertensives. Careful monitoring of blood pressure is suggested during concurrent therapy of MAOIs with calcium-channel blockers. Patients should be instructed to rise slowly from a sitting position, and to report syncope or changes in blood pressure or heart rate to their health care provider during concurrent use of an MAOI and a calcium-channel blocker.
    Remifentanil: (Moderate) The risk of significant hypotension and/or bradycardia during therapy with remifentanil may be increased in patients receiving calcium-channel blockers due to additive hypotensive effects.
    Ribociclib: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with ribociclib is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Ribociclib is a strong CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Ribociclib; Letrozole: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with ribociclib is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Ribociclib is a strong CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Rifabutin: (Moderate) Rifabutin may induce the CYP3A4 metabolism of calcium-channel blockers such as amlodipine and thereby reduce their oral bioavailability. The dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased in patients receiving concurrent enzyme inducers.
    Rifampin: (Moderate) Rifampin is a potent inducer of the cytochrome P450 hepatic enzyme system and can reduce the plasma concentrations and possibly the efficacy of calcium-channel blockers. The dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased in patients receiving concurrent enzyme inducers.
    Rifapentine: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with rifapentine is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and rifapentine is a strong CYP3A4 inducer. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Risperidone: (Moderate) Risperidone has been associated with orthostatic hypotension and may enhance the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents. Clinically significant hypotension has been observed with concomitant use of risperidone and antihypertensive medications. Lower initial doses or slower dose titration of risperidone may be necessary in patients receiving antihypertensive agents concomitantly.
    Ritonavir: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Rofecoxib: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Saquinavir: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Segesterone Acetate; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients.
    Sevoflurane: (Major) The depression of cardiac contractility, conductivity, and automaticity as well as the vascular dilation associated with general anesthetics may be potentiated by calcium-channel blockers. Alternatively, general anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of calcium-channel blockers. When used concomitantly, anesthetics and calcium-channel blockers should be titrated carefully to avoid excessive cardiovascular depression.
    Sildenafil: (Moderate) Monitor for additive hypotension if amlodipine is administered concurrently with sildenafil, as both agents act independently to reduce blood pressure. When sildenafil 100 mg was co-administered with amlodipine (5 mg or 10 mg) to hypertensive patients, the mean additional reduction on supine blood pressure (SBP) was 8 mmHg systolic and 7 mmHg diastolic
    Silodosin: (Moderate) Monitor for adverse effects if silodosin is coadministered with amlodipine. The incidence of dizziness and orthostatic hypotension were increased in patients also receiving antihypertensive medications in clinical trials.
    Simeprevir: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine with simeprevir, an inhibitor of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and intestinal CYP3A4, may result in increased amlodipine plasma concentrations. Caution and clinical monitoring are recommended if these drugs are administered together.
    Simvastatin: (Major) Do not exceed a simvastatin dose of 20 mg/day in patients taking amlodipine due to increased risk of myopathy, including rhabdomyolysis. For patients chronically receiving simvastatin 80 mg/day who need to be started on amlodipine, consider switching to an alternative statin with less potential for interaction. Carefully weigh the benefits of combined use of amlodipine and simvastatin against the potential risks. Amlodipine increases the simvastatin exposure by approximately 1.5-fold.
    Simvastatin; Sitagliptin: (Major) Do not exceed a simvastatin dose of 20 mg/day in patients taking amlodipine due to increased risk of myopathy, including rhabdomyolysis. For patients chronically receiving simvastatin 80 mg/day who need to be started on amlodipine, consider switching to an alternative statin with less potential for interaction. Carefully weigh the benefits of combined use of amlodipine and simvastatin against the potential risks. Amlodipine increases the simvastatin exposure by approximately 1.5-fold.
    Sincalide: (Moderate) Sincalide-induced gallbladder ejection fraction may be affected by calcium-channel blockers. False study results are possible in patients with drug-induced hyper- or hypo-responsiveness; thorough patient history is important in the interpretation of results.
    Sirolimus: (Major) Reduce the nab-sirolimus dose to 56 mg/m2 if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary. The dose of sirolimus may also need to be reduced with coadministration of amlodipine. Monitor sirolimus serum concentrations as appropriate and watch for sirolimus-related adverse reactions with coadministration of amlodipine. Sirolimus is a sensitive CYP3A substrate with a narrow therapeutic range; amlodipine is a weak CYP3A inhibitor.
    Sofosbuvir; Velpatasvir: (Moderate) Use caution when administering velpatasvir with amlodipine. Taking these drugs together may increase velpatasvir plasma concentrations, potentially resulting in adverse events. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor; velpatasvir is a substrate of CYP3A4.
    Sofosbuvir; Velpatasvir; Voxilaprevir: (Moderate) Use caution when administering velpatasvir with amlodipine. Taking these drugs together may increase velpatasvir plasma concentrations, potentially resulting in adverse events. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor; velpatasvir is a substrate of CYP3A4.
    Sotalol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Sotorasib: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with sotorasib is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and sotorasib is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    St. John's Wort, Hypericum perforatum: (Moderate) Closely monitor blood pressure if coadministration of amlodipine with St. John's Wort is necessary. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate and St. John's Wort is a strong CYP3A inducer. No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine; however, concomitant use may result in decreased plasma concentrations of amlodipine.
    Sufentanil: (Moderate) Because the dose of the sufentanil sublingual tablets cannot be titrated, consider an alternate opiate if amlodipine must be administered. Consider a reduced dose of sufentanil injection with frequent monitoring for respiratory depression and sedation if concurrent use of amlodipine is necessary. If amlodipine is discontinued, consider increasing the sufentanil injection dose until stable drug effects are achieved and monitor for evidence of opioid withdrawal. Sufentanil is a CYP3A4 substrate, and coadministration with a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor like amlodipine can increase sufentanil exposure resulting in increased or prolonged opioid effects including fatal respiratory depression, particularly when an inhibitor is added to a stable dose of sufentanil. If amlodipine is discontinued, sufentanil plasma concentrations will decrease resulting in reduced efficacy of the opioid and potential withdrawal syndrome in a patient who has developed physical dependence to sufentanil.
    Sulindac: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Sumatriptan; Naproxen: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Tacrolimus: (Moderate) Monitor for increased tacrolimus adverse reactions if coadministered with amlodipine. Taking these drugs together may increase tacrolimus plasma concentrations, potentially resulting in adverse events. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor; tacrolimus is a substrate of CYP3A4 with a narrow therapeutic index.
    Tamsulosin: (Moderate) The concomitant administration of tamsulosin with other antihypertensive agents can cause additive hypotensive effects. In addition, diltiazem, nicardipine, and verapamil may increase tamsulosin plasma concentrations via CYP3A4 inhibition. This interaction can be therapeutically advantageous, but dosages must be adjusted accordingly.
    Telaprevir: (Moderate) Close clinical monitoring is advised when administering amlodipine with telaprevir due to an increased potential for amlodipine-related adverse events. A reduction in the dose of amlodipine should be considered. If amlodipine dose adjustments are made, re-adjust the dose upon completion of telaprevir treatment. Predictions about the interaction can be made based on the metabolic pathway of amlodipine. Amlodipine is metabolized by the hepatic isoenzyme CYP3A4; telaprevir inhibits this isoenzyme. Coadministration may result in elevated amlodipine plasma concentrations.
    Telithromycin: (Moderate) Serious adverse events, including hypotension, have been reported in patients taking telithromycin concomitantly with calcium channel blockers metabolized by the cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 isoenzyme, such as amlodipine. Telithromycin is a substrate and inhibitor of the CYP3A4 isozyme. Concurrent administration may result in increased serum concentrations of the calcium channel blocker and increased risk for adverse events.
    Temsirolimus: (Moderate) Monitor for signs and symptoms of angioedema if temsirolimus is administered concomitantly with amlodipine. Angioedema has been reported in patients taking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors in combination with amlodipine.
    Tetrabenazine: (Moderate) Tetrabenazine may induce orthostatic hypotension and thus enhance the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents. Lower initial doses or slower dose titration of tetrabenazine may be necessary in patients receiving antihypertensive agents concomitantly.
    Tetracaine: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents. Use extreme caution with the concomitant use of tetracaine and antihypertensive agents.
    Thalidomide: (Moderate) Thalidomide and other agents that slow cardiac conduction such as calcium-channel blockers should be used cautiously due to the potential for additive bradycardia.
    Thiothixene: (Moderate) Thiothixene should be used cautiously in patients receiving antihypertensive agents. Additive hypotensive effects are possible.
    Timolol: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Tipranavir: (Moderate) Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate. Theoretically, CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as anti-retroviral protease inhibitors, may increase the plasma concentration of amlodipine via CYP3A4 inhibition; this effect might lead to hypotension in some individuals. Caution should be used when anti-retroviral protease inhibitors are coadministered with amlodipine; therapeutic response should be monitored. Ritonavir also prolongs the PR interval in some patients; however, the impact on the PR interval of coadministration of ritonavir with other drugs that prolong the PR interval (including calcium channel blockers) has not been evaluated. If coadministration of these drugs is warranted, do so with caution and careful monitoring. Decreased calcium-channel blocker doses may be warranted.
    Tolmetin: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Topiramate: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as topiramate, are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Tramadol: (Moderate) Consider a tramadol dosage reduction until stable drug effects are achieved if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary. Closely monitor for seizures, serotonin syndrome, and signs of sedation and respiratory depression. Respiratory depression from increased tramadol exposure may be fatal. Concurrent use of amlodipine, a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor, may increase tramadol exposure and result in greater CYP2D6 metabolism thereby increasing exposure to the active metabolite M1, which is a more potent mu-opioid agonist.
    Tramadol; Acetaminophen: (Moderate) Consider a tramadol dosage reduction until stable drug effects are achieved if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary. Closely monitor for seizures, serotonin syndrome, and signs of sedation and respiratory depression. Respiratory depression from increased tramadol exposure may be fatal. Concurrent use of amlodipine, a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor, may increase tramadol exposure and result in greater CYP2D6 metabolism thereby increasing exposure to the active metabolite M1, which is a more potent mu-opioid agonist.
    Trandolapril; Verapamil: (Moderate) When verapamil (non-dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker) and amlodipine (dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocker) are given, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance may occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis. Also, amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and verapamil is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor. Coadministration of diltiazem (moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor) with amlodipine in elderly hypertensive patients resulted in a 60% increase in amlodipine systemic exposure. A similar pharmacokinetic effect may occur with verapamil. While concomitant use may be beneficial for carefully selected patients, caution is warranted; blood pressure, heart rate, and therapeutic response should be closely monitored.
    Tranylcypromine: (Major) Avoid concomitant use of calcium-channel blockers and tranylcypromine due to the risk of additive hypotension. Potential for this interaction persists for up to 10 days after discontinuation of tranylcypromine (or 4 to 5 half-lives after discontinuation of the calcium-channel blocker). If a medication-free interval is not feasible, initiate therapy at the lowest appropriate dose and monitor blood pressure closely.
    Trazodone: (Minor) Due to additive hypotensive effects, patients receiving antihypertensive agents concurrently with trazodone may have excessive hypotension. Decreased dosage of the antihypertensive agent may be required when given with trazodone.
    Treprostinil: (Moderate) Calcium-channel blockers can have additive hypotensive effects with other antihypertensive agents. This additive effect can be desirable, but the patient should be monitored carefully and the dosage should be adjusted based on clinical response.
    Triazolam: (Moderate) Monitor for signs of triazolam toxicity during coadministration with amlodipine and consider appropriate dose reduction of triazolam if clinically indicated. Coadministration may increase triazolam exposure. Triazolam is a sensitive CYP3A substrate and amlodipine is a weak CYP3A inhibitor.
    Tucatinib: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with tucatinib is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Tucatinib is a strong CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Valdecoxib: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.
    Valproic Acid, Divalproex Sodium: (Minor) Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with amlodipine can theoretically increase the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine (a CYP3A4 substrate). Caution should be used when CYP3A4 inducers, such as valproic acid, divalproex sodium, are coadministered with amlodipine. Monitor therapeutic response; the dosage requirements of amlodipine may be increased.
    Vemurafenib: (Moderate) Vemurafenib is an inducer of CYP3A4 and decreased plasma concentrations of drugs metabolized by this enzyme, such as amlodipine, could be expected with concurrent use. Use caution, and monitor therapeutic effects of amlodipine when coadministered with vemurafenib.
    Verapamil: (Moderate) When verapamil (non-dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker) and amlodipine (dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocker) are given, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance may occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis. Also, amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate and verapamil is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor. Coadministration of diltiazem (moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor) with amlodipine in elderly hypertensive patients resulted in a 60% increase in amlodipine systemic exposure. A similar pharmacokinetic effect may occur with verapamil. While concomitant use may be beneficial for carefully selected patients, caution is warranted; blood pressure, heart rate, and therapeutic response should be closely monitored.
    Verteporfin: (Moderate) Use caution if coadministration of verteporfin with calcium channel blockers is necessary due to the risk of increased photosensitivity. Verteporfin is a light-activated drug used in photodynamic therapy; all patients treated with verteporfin will be photosensitive. Concomitant use with calcium channel blockers could enhance the rate of verteporfin uptake by the vascular endothelium, resulting in enhanced photosensitivity.
    Vinorelbine: (Moderate) Monitor for an earlier onset and/or increased severity of vinorelbine-related adverse reactions, including constipation and peripheral neuropathy, if coadministration with amlodipine is necessary. Vinorelbine is a CYP3A4 substrate and amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor.
    Voriconazole: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with voriconazole is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Voriconazole is a strong CYP3A inhibitor and amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase the plasma concentrations of amlodipine to a greater extent.
    Voxelotor: (Moderate) Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema if coadministration of amlodipine with voxelotor is necessary; adjust the dose of amlodipine as clinically appropriate. Amlodipine is a CYP3A substrate; voxelotor is a moderate CYP3A inhibitor. Coadministration with a moderate CYP3A inhibitor in elderly hypertensive patients increased systemic exposure to amlodipine by 60%. However, coadministration with another moderate CYP3A inhibitor in healthy volunteers did not significantly change amlodipine exposure.
    Warfarin: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with amlodipine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Yohimbine: (Moderate) Yohimbine (a selective central alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist) can increase blood pressure, and therefore can antagonize the therapeutic action of antihypertensive drugs in general. One study in patients with essential hypertension (n = 25) reported an average rise of 5 mmHg in mean blood pressure and a 66% increase in plasma norepinephrine (NE) concentrations following yohimbine administration (4 x 5.4 mg tablets PO). Use with particular caution in hypertensive patients with high or uncontrolled BP.
    Zafirlukast: (Minor) Zafirlukast is a CYP3A4 inhibitor which theoretically may decrease the hepatic metabolism of amlodipine, a CYP3A4 substrate.
    Ziprasidone: (Minor) Ziprasidone is a moderate antagonist of alpha-1 receptors and may cause orthostatic hypotension with or without tachycardia, dizziness, or syncope. Additive hypotensive effects are possible if ziprasidone is used concurrently with antihypertensive agents.

    PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

    Pregnancy

    Data with amlodipine use in pregnancy are insufficient to inform a drug-associated risk for major birth defects and miscarriage. Hypertension during pregnancy increases the risk of preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, premature delivery, and delivery complications. Fetal risks include intrauterine growth restriction and intrauterine death. Data for animal reproductive studies indicate no evidence of adverse developmental effects when pregnant rats and rabbits were treated orally with amlodipine during organogenesis at doses approximately 10- and 20-times the maximum recommended human dose, respectively. Litter size for rats was decreased by about 50% and the number of intrauterine deaths was increased approximately 5-fold. Amlodipine has been shown to prolong the gestation period and the duration of labor in rats at this dose.[29090] [64409]

    Amlodipine is present in human breastmilk; however, no adverse effects of amlodipine on the breast-fed infant have been observed. There is no information on the effect of amlodipine on milk production in breast-feeding women.[29090] [64409] In a study of 31 lactating women with pregnancy-induced hypertension, the median relative infant dose (RID) of amlodipine in human milk was 4.2% (interquartile range, 3.12% to 7.25%) and the maximum RID was 15.2%.[64369] In another study that enrolled 8 lactating women, the average RID for amlodipine was 3.4% (range, 1.56% to 4.32%).[64368]

    MECHANISM OF ACTION

    Amlodipine inhibits the influx of extracellular calcium across the myocardial and vascular smooth muscle cell membranes. Serum calcium levels remain unchanged. Amlodipine inhibits this influx, and the resultant decrease in intracellular calcium inhibits the contractile processes of the myocardial smooth muscle cells, resulting in dilation of the coronary and systemic arteries. As with other calcium-channel blockers of the dihydropyridine class, amlodipine exerts its effects mainly on arteriolar vasculature. It has no significant effect on sinus node function or cardiac conduction, nor does it possess negative inotropic effects at clinical doses. Because it has a gradual onset, reflex tachycardia does not occur, a side effect that is common with other peripheral vasodilators. Amlodipine therapy usually does not affect hemodynamic parameters in patients with normal ventricular function.
     
    Amlodipine reduces coronary vascular resistance and increases coronary blood flow. These actions increase oxygen delivery to the myocardial tissue. Myocardial oxygen consumption is also reduced. Thus, amlodipine's beneficial effects in the treatment of angina are a result of multiple actions. In general, calcium-channel blockers exert favorable effects on LVH, and do not worsen insulin resistance or exert detrimental effects on the lipid profile.

    PHARMACOKINETICS

    Amlodipine is administered orally. Amlodipine is approximately 93% bound to plasma proteins. Amlodipine is extensively metabolized to inactive compounds by the liver with 10% of the parent compound and 60% of the inactive metabolites excreted in the urine. The terminal half-life is about 30 to 50 hours. Steady-state plasma concentrations of amlodipine are reached after 7 to 8 days of consecutive daily dosing.
     
    Affected cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and drug transporters: CYP3A4
    Amlodipine is a CYP3A4 substrate, and its metabolism may be affected by CYP3A4 inhibitors or inducers. Coadministration of erythromycin in healthy volunteers did not significantly change amlodipine systemic exposure; however, strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase amlodipine plasma concentrations to a greater extent.

    Oral Route

    After oral administration, amlodipine peak plasma concentrations are achieved between 6 to 12 hours. Oral bioavailability is estimated to be 64% to 90%; food does not significantly affect absorption.[29090] [64409] The exposure of amlodipine oral suspension is similar to that of the tablets.[64409]