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  • CLASSES

    Vitamin K Antagonists

    DEA CLASS

    Rx

    DESCRIPTION

    Coumarin anticoagulant
    Used to prevent and treat thromboembolic disease
    Major hemorrhagic risks have decreased due to the adoption of INR method of monitoring and decreasing the intensity of anticoagulation for most indications; observe for drug interactions

    COMMON BRAND NAMES

    Coumadin, Jantoven

    HOW SUPPLIED

    Coumadin/Jantoven/Warfarin/Warfarin Sodium Oral Tab: 1mg, 2mg, 2.5mg, 3mg, 4mg, 5mg, 6mg, 7.5mg, 10mg

    DOSAGE & INDICATIONS

    For general dosing information in patients requiring warfarin anticoagulation.
    NOTE: Clinical practice guidelines recommend against the routine use of pharmacogenetic testing for guiding dosing in patients initiating warfarin therapy.
    Oral dosage
    Adults without known risks for enhanced INR response to warfarin

    2 to 5 mg PO once daily. Typical maintenance doses are 2 to 10 mg PO once daily. Clinical practice guidelines recommend 10 mg PO once daily for the first 2 days for patients healthy enough to be treated as outpatients.

    Geriatric, malnourished or debilitated patients, patients with cardiac failure, hepatic insufficiency, or a higher bleeding risk

    Initially, 5 mg or less PO may be appropriate to reduce the risk of excessive INR elevation and potential bleeding events.

    Adults who have undergone heart valve replacement

    Initially, 2 to 3 mg PO may be appropriate to reduce the risk of excessive INR elevation and potential bleeding events. These patients have a higher sensitivity to warfarin probably due to effects of cardiopulmonary bypass and concomitant therapies.

    Adults with VKORC1 variant GG and CYP2C9 variant *1/*1 or *1/*2

    Initially, 5 to 7 mg PO once daily. Of note, this dose range is the stable maintenance dose observed in multiple patients having this combination of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene variants.

    Adults with VKORC1 variant GG and CYP2C9 variant *1/*3, *2/*2, or *2/*3

    Initially, 3 to 4 mg PO once daily. Of note, this dose range is the stable maintenance dose observed in multiple patients having this combination of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene variants. Patients with these CYP2C9 variants may require more prolonged time (more than 2 to 4 weeks) to achieve maximum INR effect for a given dosage regimen.

    Adults with VKORC1 variant AG and CYP2C9 variant *1/*1

    Initially, 5 to 7 mg PO once daily. Of note, this dose range is the stable maintenance dose observed in multiple patients having this combination of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene variants.

    Adults with VKORC1 variant AG and CYP2C9 variant *1/*2, *1/*3, or *2/*2

    Initially, 3 to 4 mg PO once daily. Of note, this dose range is the stable maintenance dose observed in multiple patients having this combination of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene variants. Patients with CYP2C9 *1/*3 or *2/*2 may require more prolonged time (more than 2 to 4 weeks) to achieve maximum INR effect for a given dosage regimen.

    Adults with VKORC1 variant AG and CYP2C9 variant *2/*3

    Initially, 0.5 to 2 mg PO once daily. Of note, this dose range is the stable maintenance dose observed in multiple patients having this combination of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene variants. Patients with this CYP2C9 variant may require more prolonged time (more than 2 to 4 weeks) to achieve maximum INR effect for a given dosage regimen.

    Adults with VKORC1 variant AA and CYP2C9 variant *1/*1 or *1/*2

    Initially, 3 to 4 mg PO once daily. Of note, this dose range is the stable maintenance dose observed in multiple patients having this combination of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene variants.

    Adults with VKORC1 variant AA and CYP2C9 variant *1/*3, *2/*2 or *2/*3

    Initially, 0.5 to 2 mg PO once daily. Of note, this dose range is the stable maintenance dose observed in multiple patients having this combination of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene variants. Patients with these CYP2C9 variants may require more prolonged time (more than 2 to 4 weeks) to achieve maximum INR effect for a given dosage regimen.

    Adults with VKORC1 variant AA, AG, or GG and CYP2C9 variant *3/*3

    Initially, 0.5 to 2 mg PO once daily. Of note, this dose range is the stable maintenance dose observed in multiple patients having this combination of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene variants. Patients with this CYP2C9 variant may require more prolonged time (more than 2 to 4 weeks) to achieve maximum INR effect for a given dosage regimen.

    Neonates, Infants, Children, and Adolescents

    Initially, 0.2 mg/kg/dose PO once daily for 2 days; adjust dosage until the desired INR is achieved. A lower initial dose of 0.1 mg/kg/dose PO once daily is recommended for patients with Fontan circulation. Patients with impaired liver function should also receive a lower initial dosage. A maximum dosage for warfarin has not been defined; however, most adult patients are maintained on doses ranging from 2 to 10 mg/day. Weight-based dosage requirements for warfarin have been determined to be age-dependent. In a large cohort of pediatric patients (n = 262), infants required an average daily dose of 0.33 mg/kg while adolescents required an average daily dose of 0.09 mg/kg to maintain the INR between 2 and 3. Specific dosing recommendations for use in pediatric patients are not available in the FDA-approved product labeling; dosage initiation and adjustments must be made carefully to prevent subtherapeutic or excessive anticoagulation.

    For treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis or pulmonary embolism prophylaxis.
    For the treatment and further prevention of DVT or pulmonary embolism (PE) after the initial, acute phase of treatment.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    Treatment with warfarin should be started on the same day as heparin, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), or fondaparinux and continue for 5 days or more and until the INR is 2 or more for 24 hours or more. Warfarin should be continued for 3 months in most patients, including patients with a proximal DVT or PE that is provoked by surgery or nonsurgical transient risk factor. Patients with an unprovoked PE or DVT of the leg should be treated for at least 3 months if the risk of bleeding is low or moderate and for 3 months if there is a high bleeding risk. For patients with venous thromboembolism associated with active cancer, treatment should continue for more than 3 months. In patients who receive extended treatment (i.e., more than 3 months), the same anticoagulant should be used as the first 3 months and continuation of therapy should be assessed at periodic intervals. Patients with activated protein C resistance should probably receive indefinite treatment if they have recurrent disease, are homozygous for the gene, or have multiple thrombophilic conditions.

    For DVT prophylaxis in patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement surgery or hip fracture surgery†.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    Target INR of 2.5 (range 2 to 3) is recommended by clinical practice guidelines. For patients who are not candidates for injections or an intermittent pneumatic compression device (IPCD), adjusted-dose warfarin is an alternative to the preferred regimen, low molecular weight heparin, or secondarily, apixaban or dabigatran, as antithrombotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement surgery or hip fracture surgery. Warfarin should be started preoperatively or the evening of the surgery. Dual prophylaxis with pharmacologic therapy and IPCD is encouraged for the duration of the hospital stay. Pharmacologic therapy should continue for a minimum of 10 to 14 days after surgery; up to 35 days is recommended.

    For DVT prophylaxis in patients with long-term indwelling central venous catheters to prevent axillary-subclavian venous thrombosis†.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    1 mg PO once daily (INR 1.3 to 1.9).

    For thrombosis prophylaxis (i.e., arterial thromboembolism prophylaxis, stroke prophylaxis, or coronary artery thrombosis prophylaxis).
    NOTE: For information regarding prophylaxis in orthopedic surgery or with central venous catheters, see 'deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis'.
    For coronary artery thrombosis prophylaxis in high or very high-risk patients with stable angina† or chronic coronary artery disease†.
    Oral dosage
    Adult males at high-risk for cardiovascular events

    Low-intensity warfarin (target INR 1.5) has been recommended in men at high risk of cardiovascular events in the prevention of those events and for reduction of overall mortality.

    Adult males at very high-risk for cardiovascular events

    The combination of low-dose aspirin (75 to 80 mg/day) and low-intensity warfarin (target INR 1.5) may be considered over either agent alone for the prevention of cardiovascular events and reduction in mortality for men at very high-risk for such events.

    For thrombosis prophylaxis in patients with prosthetic heart valves.
    Oral dosage
    Adults with bioprosthetic heart valves

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend a target INR of 2.5 is recommended for the first 3 months after valve insertion. After 3 months, aspirin 75 to 100 mg PO daily is recommended. Therapy for as long as 6 months may be considered for up to 6 months in patients who have had aortic valve insertion. Patients with risk factors for thromboembolism (e.g., atrial fibrillation) should receive lifelong warfarin therapy.

    Adults with mechanical prosthetic mitral valve replacement

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend a target INR of 3 (range 2.5 to 3.5) with aspirin 75 to 100 mg PO daily.

    Adults with mechanical prosthetic aortic valve replacement and no risk factors for thromboembolism

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend a target INR of 2.5 (range 2 to 3) with aspirin 75 to 100 mg PO daily.

    Adults with mechanical prosthetic aortic valve replacement and risk factors for thromboembolism

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend a target INR of 3 (range 2.5 to 3.5) with aspirin 75 to 100 mg PO daily. Risk factors for thromboembolism include atrial fibrillation, previous thromboembolism, left ventricular dysfunction, hypercoagulable condition or an older generation mechanical aortic valve (e.g., ball-in cage).

    Pregnant females

    If possible, avoid the use of warfarin during the first trimester of pregnancy and near term. As an alternative to adjusted-dose heparin or adjusted-dose LMWH throughout the pregnancy, warfarin may be initiated after the thirteenth week of pregnancy. Heparin or LMWH should be resumed close to delivery. In women who are high risk for thromboembolism (e.g., older generation prosthesis in the mitral position or history of thromboembolism), warfarin may be used throughout the pregnancy and replaced with heparin or LMWH close to delivery; low-dose aspirin (75 to 100 mg/day) also is recommended. Long-term anticoagulation should be resumed postpartum when hemostasis is assured. Other practice guidelines suggest warfarin plus aspirin 75 to 100 mg PO daily may be used during the first trimester in patients who can achieve therapeutic INR with doses of 5 mg/day or less with frequent monitoring and only after full discussion of the risks and benefits of warfarin therapy during the first trimester of pregnancy.

    Adults with mechanical prosthetic heart valves and infective endocarditis

    Discontinue warfarin therapy at the time of initial presentation until the need for invasive procedures are ruled out and the patient has been stabilized without signs of central nervous system involvement. Warfarin can be reinstituted when the patient is stable and has not contraindications for therapy or neurologic complications.

    Children with mechanical prosthetic heart valves

    Based on adult data, the recommended target INR is 3 (range 2.5 to 3.5). If systemic embolism occurs despite adequate anticoagulation, add aspirin (6 to 20 mg/day) or dipyridamole (2 to 5 mg/kg/day). When full-dose anticoagulation therapy is contraindicated, long-term therapy with warfarin to a target INR of 2.5 (range 2 to 3) in combination with aspirin (6 to 20 mg/day) and dipyridamole (2 to 5 mg/kg/day) may be used.

    For thrombosis prophylaxis in patients with mechanical prosthetic heart valves and a history of bleeding while receiving warfarin therapy.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    Every effort should be made to maintain the INR at the lower limit of the therapeutic range (See standard dosage guidelines for prosthetic heart valve patients). For patients with a mechanical prosthetic heart valve and a persistent risk of increased bleeding, the anticoagulant intensity can be reduced to an INR of 2 to 2.5.

    For stroke prophylaxis in patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after primary treatment with heparin or LMWH.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    Target INR of 2.5 (range 2 to 3) for 3 to 6 months has been recommended.

    For thrombosis prophylaxis in patients with valvular heart disease.
    Oral dosage
    Adults with rheumatic mitral valve disease

    Target INR of 2.5 (range 2 to 3) is recommended in patients with a history of systemic embolism or presence of paroxysmal or chronic atrial fibrillation. For patients in normal sinus rhythm and left atrial diameter more than 5.5 cm, consider long-term warfarin (target INR 2.5, range 2 to 3) based on risk factors for thromboembolism. For patients with recurrent systemic embolism despite adequate warfarin therapy, increase INR goal to 3 (range 2.5 to 3.5), or add aspirin (80 to 100 mg/day): for patients unable to take aspirin add dipyridamole (400 mg/day), ticlopidine (250 mg PO twice daily), or clopidogrel (75 mg/day PO).

    Adults with mitral valve prolapse and documented systemic embolism, recurrent TIA, chronic or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation despite aspirin

    Long-term warfarin therapy (INR target 2.5, range 2 to 3) is recommended.

    Adults with mitral annular calcification and systemic embolism not calcified or atrial fibrillation

    Long-term warfarin therapy (INR target 2.5, range 2 to 3) is recommended.

    Adults with non-rheumatic mitral regurgitation and atrial fibrillation or history of systemic embolism

    Long-term warfarin therapy (INR target 2.5, range 2 to 3) is recommended.

    Adults with aortic valve and aortic arch disorders

    Only in patients with mobile aortic atheroma and aortic plaque more than 4 mm (by TEE) is long-term warfarin therapy (INR target 2.5, range 2 to 3) recommended.

    Adults with patent foramen ovale (PFO)or atrial septal aneurysm with unexplained systemic embolism or TIA or documented DVT or PE

    Long term warfarin therapy (INR target 2.5, range 2 to 3) is recommended unless venous interruption or PFO closure is considered preferable therapy. In selecting therapy, consider the possibility of paradoxic embolism and systemic embolism from the arterial side of the aneurysm.

    For stroke prophylaxis in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), particularly in the subgroup of patients with concomitant atrial fibrillation or with a prior history of systemic embolization.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    The use of anticoagulation in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is controversial. In patients with concomitant atrial fibrillation or with a prior history of systemic embolization, a target INR of 2 to 3 has been recommended. Not recommended for patients with DCM and no coexisting risk factors.

    For secondary myocardial infarction prophylaxis (i.e., prevention of a subsequent myocardial infarction or coronary artery thrombosis prophylaxis) or for stroke prophylaxis in high-risk postmyocardial infarction patients (e.g., patients with acute MI complicated by severe LV dysfunction, CHF, atrial fibrillation, previous emboli, or 2D echocardiograph evidence of mural thrombosis).
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    The use of warfarin following myocardial infarction (MI) is controversial. After MI, warfarin may be used to reduce the risk of systemic or pulmonary embolism in high-risk patients such as those with anterior Q-wave infarction, AF, severe LV dysfunction, or cardiac failure. The optimal antithrombotic regimen for long-term management in patients post-MI has not been established. Three potential strategies for antithrombotic therapy following MI have been recommended: 1) aspirin alone, 2) aspirin plus moderate-intensity (INR 2 to 3) warfarin, or 3) high-intensity (INR 3 to 4) warfarin alone. The ASPECT-2 study reported reduced cardiovascular events and deaths with high-intensity (INR 3 to 4) warfarin or moderate-intensity (INR 2 to 2.5) warfarin plus aspirin 80 mg/day compared to aspirin alone (80 mg/day). A similar trial, WARIS II, compared warfarin (INR 2.8 to 4.2), aspirin 75 mg/day, or aspirin 75 mg/day plus warfarin (INR 2 to 2.5), initiated at discharge post-MI. Consistent with the ASPECT-2 trial, the WARIS II warfarin regimens are more effective in reducing composite events (death, MI, stroke) vs. aspirin alone, but have a higher rate of bleeding and require greater monitoring. Further study is needed to evaluate other strategies such as aspirin plus low-intensity warfarin (INR less than 2) or monotherapy with moderate intensity warfarin (INR 2 to 3). Previously, in the ASPECT-1 study comparing oral anticoagulation to placebo, patients given anticoagulants were less likely to suffer a recurrent MI; however, since the benefits were not better than studies of aspirin and since the risk of bleeding complications is greater with oral anticoagulants, many clinicians traditionally prescribed aspirin in this setting. Aspirin has been recommended over warfarin for long-term therapy in patients with a low risk of embolism. Warfarin therapy (target INR of 2.5 (range: 2 to 3) for 3 months or less) has been recommended in the clinical setting of increased embolic risk or if aspirin or other anti-platelet therapy is contraindicated. Warfarin should be continued indefinitely in patients with atrial fibrillation. Some patients with recurrent ischemic episodes following acute MI may benefit from a combination of warfarin and aspirin. Treatment with low-dose aspirin and low-intensity warfarin (target INR of 1.5) has been suggested.

    For the coronary artery thrombosis prophylaxis in patients with unstable angina†.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    Patients who have contraindications to aspirin, ticlopidine, and clopidogrel should receive heparin, followed by warfarin (INR 2 to 3) for a period of several months. Aspirin in combination with therapeutic anticoagulation (heparin for the first 3 to 4 days after the onset of acute unstable angina followed by warfarin for up to 12 weeks) was found to be superior to aspirin alone in 214 patients with unstable angina. In this study, therapy was initiated within a mean of 9.5 hours of qualifying pain and warfarin was dosed to achieve an INR of 2 to 3. NOTE: ACCP guidelines recommend against routine use of warfarin after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) unless there is a specific indication for systemic anticoagulation.

    For prophylaxis of arterial and/or venous thromboembolism in patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    Clinical practice guidelines suggest a moderate-intensity INR range (INR 2—3) rather than higher intensity (INR 3—4.5) for patients with previous arterial or venous thromboembolism.

    For the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic complications of atrial fibrillation.
    For patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    A target INR of 2.5 (range: 2 to 3) is recommended. For eligible patients, novel oral anticoagulants (i.e., apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, rivaroxaban) are preferred over warfarin therapy.    

    For patients with valvular atrial fibrillation (e.g., valvular heart disease, mechanical valves, prosthetic valves).
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    A target INR of 2.5 (range: 2 to 3) is recommended in atrial fibrillation patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis or moderate to severe mitral stenosis. A target INR of 3 (range: 2.5 to 3.5) is recommended for atrial fibrillation patients with mechanical heart valves. Patients with mechanical heart valves should also receive aspirin 75 mg to 100 mg PO once daily.  

    For patients with atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter who are undergoing cardioversion.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    A target INR of 2.5 (range: 2 to 3) is recommended for 3 weeks before and 4 weeks or more after the procedure in patients with atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter of 48 hours of duration or longer who do not require immediate cardioversion.

    For thromboprophylaxis† in patients with heart failure† who are in sinus rhythm.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    Dosage not established. Oral dosing to maintain a target INR of 2 to 3.5 has been studied. Warfarin use in patients with heart failure in sinus rhythm is not associated with a reduction in thromboembolism and can result in major hemorrhage.

    †Indicates off-label use

    MAXIMUM DOSAGE

    Warfarin has a narrow therapeutic index (see Therapeutic Drug Monitoring section). The maximum dosage is individualized based on INR monitoring and assessment of efficacy and safety parameters (see specific indications for target INR goals).

    DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

    Hepatic Impairment

    Although specific guidelines for dosage adjustment are not available, patients with hepatic impairment may require a lower dosage of warfarin due to decreased warfarin metabolism and decreased production of coagulation factors.

    Renal Impairment

    No dosage adjustment is necessary in patients with renal failure. Monitor INR more frequently in those with renal impairment to maintain the therapeutic range.

    ADMINISTRATION

    Oral Administration

    Administer dose at the same time every day. May be taken with or without food; food decreases the rate but not the extent of absorption.

    STORAGE

    Coumadin:
    - Protect from light
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)
    Jantoven :
    - Protect from light
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)

    CONTRAINDICATIONS / PRECAUTIONS

    Coumarin anticoagulants hypersensitivity

    Warfarin should be used with caution in patients with a history of coumarin anticoagulants hypersensitivity. Consensus on whether or not cross-sensitivity between warfarin and other coumarin anticoagulants such as dicumarol, acenocoumarol, or phenprocoumon occurs is not available as both cross-sensitivity on rechallenge with a different coumarin anticoagulant and successful use of a different coumarin anticoagulant has been described. A case report also describes the successful initiation of long-term anisindione (an indanedione anticoagulant) in a patient with a history of maculopapular rash to warfarin. Although no longer commercially available in the US, patients with a history of hypersensitivity to dicumarol or other coumarin anticoagulants should be monitored closely for hypersensitivity reactions including maculopapular skin eruptions or pruritus if warfarin is initiated.

    Anemia, aneurysm, aortic dissection, atrial fibrillation, bleeding, cardiac disease, cerebrovascular disease, eclampsia, endocarditis, epidural anesthesia, GI bleeding, head trauma, hematological disease, hemophilia, hypertension, intracranial bleeding, leukemia, lumbar puncture, neoplastic disease, peptic ulcer disease, pericardial effusion, pericarditis, polycythemia vera, preeclampsia, renal disease, renal failure, renal impairment, retinal bleeding, spinal anesthesia, stroke, surgery, vasculitis

    Warfarin can cause major or fatal bleeding. Warfarin is contraindicated in patients with conditions in which therapy with warfarin may result in uncontrolled bleeding including hematological disease; GI bleeding, genitourinary bleeding, respiratory tract bleeding, retinal bleeding, or intracranial bleeding; head trauma; hemorrhagic stroke; aneurysm; aortic dissection; pericarditis or pericardial effusion; bacterial endocarditis; threatened abortion; eclampsia and preeclampsia; recent or planned surgery of the central nervous system, eye, or following trauma that results in large open surfaces; diagnostic or therapeutic procedures with potential for uncontrolled bleeding including epidural anesthesia, spinal anesthesia, spinal puncture and lumbar puncture; and malignant hypertension. Due to the risk of bleeding, warfarin should be used only with extreme caution in patients with hemophilia, leukemia, peptic ulcer disease, and polycythemia vera. Usually, warfarin therapy is stopped 4 to 5 days prior to surgery. In patients with an intermediate- or high-risk for thromboembolism, give either heparin or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) as the INR falls. Administration of vitamin K 24 to 48 hours prior to surgery will shorten the duration of heparin or LMWH prior to surgery; however, it may make it more difficult to reinstitute warfarin anticoagulations. In situations with a low risk of bleeding, another option is to lower the dose of warfarin and operate at an INR of 1.3 to 1.5. This INR level has shown to be safe in randomized trials of gynecologic and orthopedic surgery patients. A severe elevation (more than 50 seconds) in activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) with a PT/INR in the desired range has been identified as a risk factor for postoperative hemorrhage. Warfarin should be used cautiously in the following conditions because bleeding, should it occur, would be extremely serious during warfarin therapy: vasculitis; polyarthritis; moderate to severe hypertension; or indwelling catheters. The risk of major bleeding with warfarin therapy is increased during the drug initiation phase, in patients 65 years of age and older, in patients with highly variable INRs, in patients requiring long-term treatment, in patients with certain genetic polymorphisms of CYP2C9 and/or VKORC1, and in patients with a history of cerebrovascular disease (e.g., stroke), GI bleeding, atrial fibrillation, or in the presence of serious comorbid conditions such as cardiac disease, malignancy (neoplastic disease), renal disease including renal impairment or renal failure, or anemia. An INR more than 4 appears to provide no additional therapeutic benefit in most patients and is associated with a higher risk of bleeding. High-intensity oral anticoagulations (INR 3 to 4.5) is associated with an unacceptable incidence of intracranial hemorrhage when used in patients with cerebral ischemia of presumed arterial origin (e.g., patients with recent TIA or minor ischemic stroke). Acute kidney injury may occur as a result of excessive anticoagulation or hematuria in patients with altered glomerular integrity or a history of renal disease; monitor INR more frequently in this population. Warfarin therapy must be individualized for the patient. Warfarin has a narrow therapeutic range and may be affected by factors such as other drugs, dietary vitamin K, and other disease states. Warfarin dosage should be controlled by periodic monitoring of the INR or other suitable coagulation tests; consideration should be given for more frequent monitoring in patients that have risk factors for major bleeding. Determination of whole blood clotting or bleeding times are not effective measures to monitor warfarin therapy. Monitor INR response and for signs of bleeding during warfarin therapy. ACCP guidelines for managing elevated INR and/or serious bleeding in adult patients are detailed in the dosage section.

    Asian patients

    Patients with genetic polymorphisms of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 may require lower maintenance dosages of warfarin as compared to patients without these polymorphisms; more frequent monitoring of the INR may also be necessary. Differences in the frequencies of these variant alleles in people with different ethnic backgrounds exist; for example, in White patients, the frequency of the CYP2C9*2 variant is 8 to 20%, while the frequency of the CYP2C9*3 variant is 6 to 10%. In Black patients, the frequencies are 2 to 4% and 1 to 2% for the presence of CYP2C9*2 or CYP2C9*3 variant alleles, respectively. In Asian patients, the CYP2C9*2 variant allele does not occur, and the frequency of the CYP2C9*3 variant allele is 1 to 4%. Similarly, ethnicity plays a role in the presence of polymorphisms in the VKORC1 gene. There are several VKORC1 variants that are known to affect warfarin dosing including -1639G>A, 1173C>T, and 3730G>A. Approximately 82%, 89%, and 13% of Asian patients carry variants in these alleles, respectively. In contrast, approximately 14%, 42%, and 45% of White patients, and 0%, 9%, and 49% of Black patients carry variants in these alleles, respectively. Around 30% of the variance associated with warfarin dosing can be attributed to the presence of a VKORC1 variant allele and 40% of the variance in dose can be attributed to the presence of both a CYP2C9 and a VKORC1 variant allele. This is supported by the fact that in Chinese patients, who express a high frequency of variant alleles of the VKORC1 gene, a relatively low maintenance dose of only 3.3 mg +/- 1.4 mg is necessary to achieve an INR of 2 to 2.5. Accordingly, the manufacturer of warfarin indicates that Asian patients may require lower initiation and maintenance doses of warfarin. The results of a meta-analysis comparing patients with CYP2C9 variant alleles to those without demonstrate that the daily warfarin dose is 17% lower in patients with at least one copy of the variant CYP2C9*2 allele (0.85 mg/day less, 95% CI 0.6 to 1.11 mg), 37% lower in patients with at least one copy of the variant CYP2C9*3 allele (1.92 mg/day less, 95% CI 1.37 to 2.47 mg), and 27% lower in patients with at least one copy of the variant CYP2C9*2 or CYP2C9*3 allele (1.47 mg/day less, 95% CI 1.24 to 1.71 mg). It should be noted that the studies in the meta-analysis enrolled primarily White patients. In a cross-sectional study, the presence of variant alleles in the CYP2C9 gene or the VKORC1 -1639 gene lead to lower daily maintenance doses of warfarin. Patients with CYP2C9*2 variants required the lowest daily dose, and patients with VKORC1 -1639 variant allele AA required the lowest daily dosage. In addition, patients with CYP2C9 variant alleles may be at increased risk of bleeding compared to patients without these genetic mutations; an increased risk of bleeding in patients with mutations in the VKORC1 gene has not been consistently demonstrated. Results from a meta-analysis indicate that the risk of bleeding (severity or type not defined) is increased in patients with at least one of the CYP2C9 variant alleles. In patients with at least one copy of the CYP2C9*2 variant allele, the relative risk of bleeding is 1.91 (95% CI 1.16 to 3.17); in patients with at least one copy of the CYP2C9*3 variant allele, the relative risk of bleeding is 1.77 (95% CI 1.07 to 2.91). Finally, in patients with a copy of either of the CYP2C9 variant alleles, the relative risk of bleeding is 2.26 (95% CI 1.36 to 3.75). Data from a study of both Black and White patients (48% Black patients) indicate that the presence of a variant allele in the CYP2C9 gene is associated with an increased risk of major hemorrhage, defined as life-threatening or fatal bleeding (RR 3, 95% CI 1.1 to 8), but not minor bleeding, regardless of race. In this study, the presence of variant alleles in the VKORC1 gene did not increase the risk of minor or major bleeding. Currently, genetic testing for these polymorphisms is not recommended prior to initiating warfarin therapy. Several dosing regimens for the initiation of warfarin have been developed based on the presence of polymorphisms, concomitant use of interacting drugs, age, height, weight, and comorbid conditions in patients already stabilized on warfarin therapy. Such dosing regimens may be beneficial in patients to minimize adverse events, especially bleeding. However, these dosing regimens have not been validated in randomized clinical trials. Currently, the routine determination of the presence of genetic polymorphisms in patients initiating warfarin is not necessary; furthermore, in patients where genetic testing is desired, delaying warfarin initiation until the results are known is not recommended.

    Dental work

    In patients at high-risk of bleeding, warfarin should be discontinued prior to dental work. However, patients not at high-risk may continue warfarin therapy in most cases. During dental procedures that require local bleeding control, administer a mouthwash acid or aminocaproic acid mouthwash, without interrupting anticoagulant therapy.

    Diabetes mellitus

    Caution should be observed when warfarin is administered to patients at risk for tissue necrosis and/or gangrene (e.g. patients with diabetes mellitus). Anticoagulations therapy with warfarin may enhance the release of atheromatous plaque emboli, increasing the risk of complication from cholesterol microembolization. Discontinuation of warfarin recommended when this occurs.

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    Warfarin should be used with caution in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) and deep venous thrombosis. The prothrombotic effects of HIT combined with the procoagulant effects of early warfarin therapy (reduced protein C activity) can result in complications including warfarin-induced skin necrosis and limb gangrene. Cases of venous limb ischemia, necrosis, and gangrene have occurred in these patients when heparin treatment was discontinued and warfarin therapy was started or continued. In some patients, amputation of the involved area and/or death occurred. Patients who develop limb gangrene while receiving warfarin often have a high INR (usually > 4) after starting warfarin therapy. The pathogenesis of warfarin-associated limb gangrene in patients with HIT appears to be insufficient protein C activity (has natural anticoagulant properties) to control the increased thrombin generation seen in these patients. Warfarin can be given safely if thrombin generation is adequately controlled with the use of danaparoid, hirudin, or argatroban, or if warfarin is initiated following resolution of the HIT. Warfarin should not be given alone or in combination with ancrod in patients with acute HIT.

    Heart failure

    Patients with congestive heart failure may exhibit greater than expected responses to warfarin. These patients require more frequent monitoring and, possibly, reduced doses of warfarin.

    Cholestasis, hepatic disease, hepatitis, jaundice

    Hepatic disease, including infectious hepatitis and cholestasis with symptoms of jaundice, potentiates the response to warfarin therapy by impairing the synthesis of coagulation factors or altering the metabolism of warfarin. Because chronic alcohol consumption may result in alcoholic liver disease (including cirrhosis), patients who chronically ingest large amounts of ethanol may have an enhanced response to warfarin therapy. In these patients, small doses of warfarin may cause a pronounced hypoprothrombinemic effect; thus, caution is required.

    Intramuscular injections

    Intramuscular injections of other drugs should be avoided if possible in patients receiving warfarin. IM injections may cause bleeding, bruising, or hematomas due to the anticoagulant effect of warfarin therapy. If required and appropriate for the administered drug, IM injections should be given to the upper extremities, which permits easy access for manual compression, inspection for bleeding, and use of pressure bandages.

    Protein C deficiency, protein S deficiency

    Patients with protein C deficiency or protein S deficiency can become transiently hypercoagulable when warfarin is initiated and may result in necrosis of the skin and underlying tissue. The risk associated with these conditions, both for recurrent thrombosis and for adverse reactions, is difficult to evaluate since it does not appear to be consistent for all patients. The initial symptom may be an intense burning in the affected area. Warfarin therapy should be immediately stopped because skin necrosis can be permanently disfiguring. If warfarin therapy is indicated in patients with protein C deficiency, anticoagulations should begin with heparin for 5—7 days to decrease the risk of tissue necrosis.

    Vitamin C deficiency

    Vitamin C deficiency causes increased capillary fragility. Administration of warfarin can increase the risk of localized bleeding in patients with vitamin C deficiency.

    Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, vitamin K deficiency

    Vitamin K deficiency enhances the response to warfarin and may lead to an increased risk of bleeding. The effects of warfarin can be potentiated in patients with poor nutritional status and decreased vitamin K intake (especially if they are treated with antibiotics and IV fluids without vitamin K supplementation) or in states of fat malabsorption. In addition, patients with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa may have poor or fluctuating vitamin K intake.

    Alcoholism, dementia, psychosis

    Because safe use of warfarin in the outpatient setting depends on good patient compliance, warfarin is contraindicated in unsupervised patients with dementia, alcoholism, or psychosis.

    Fever, hyperthyroidism, infection

    Hypermetabolic states produced by fever or hyperthyroidism can increase the responsiveness to warfarin, probably by increasing the catabolism of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. Infection or disturbances of intestinal flora due to sprue or antibiotic therapy may alter responses to warfarin. Thus, warfarin therapy should be monitored closely in these situations.

    Diarrhea, hyperlipidemia, hypothyroidism, peripheral edema

    Numerous factors alone or in combination, including travel or changes in diet, environment, physical state, and medication may influence the response to warfarin. It is considered good practice to monitor the patient's response with additional PT/INR determinations in the period immediately after discharge from the hospital and whenever other medications are initiated, discontinued, or taken irregularly. The following conditions, alone or in combination, may be responsible for increased INR responses to warfarin: collagen vascular disease, diarrhea or steatorrhea, and neoplastic disease. Peripheral edema, hereditary coumarin resistance, hyperlipidemia, hypothyroidism and nephrotic syndrome, alone or in combination, have been associated with decreased responses to warfarin.

    Tobacco smoking

    Tobacco smoke contains hydrocarbons that induce hepatic CYP450 microsomal enzymes. Because the effect on hepatic microsomal enzymes is not related to the nicotine component of tobacco, sudden tobacco smoking cessation may reduce the clearance and increase the therapeutic effects of warfarin despite the initiation of a nicotine replacement product. However, the decreased warfarin clearance may not always result in a clinically significant change in the PT or INR. Monitor to assess the need for warfarin dosage adjustment when changes in smoking status occur.

    Geriatric

    Geriatric patients are more susceptible to the effects of anticoagulants, possibly due to a decrease in the clearance of warfarin with age. Limited data suggest no difference in S-warfarin clearance and slightly decreased clearance of R-warfarin with increasing age. Therefore, lower doses of warfarin are usually required to produce a therapeutic level of anticoagulation. In addition, in a retrospective cohort of Medicare beneficiaries (mean age 79.4 years) receiving warfarin for atrial fibrillation, the use of long-term warfarin (more than 365 days) was associated with an increased risk of osteoporotic fracture (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.48), especially vertebral fracture. However, when analyzed separately by gender, the increased risk of fracture was significant in men (odds ratio 1.63, 95% CI 1.26 to 2.1), but not women (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.26). Furthermore, the risk of fracture was not increased in patients taking warfarin for less than 1 year. Other independent predictors of fracture in this cohort of patients (regardless of the length of warfarin therapy) were increasing age, high risk of falls, hyperthyroidism, neuropsychiatric disease, and alcoholism. Factors that were associated with a protective risk of fracture include the Black population, male gender, and the use of beta-adrenergic antagonists. Because the available alternative therapies (e.g., heparin, low molecular weight heparin) have also been associated with an increased risk of fracture, the authors of this study recommend that when prescribing warfarin to patients at risk of falling, patients should be encouraged to wear stable shoes, consume adequate amounts of calcium and vitamin D, exercise regularly, and use walking aids when necessary. In addition, unnecessary drugs should be discontinued. The federal Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) regulates medication use in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). According to OBRA, warfarin use must be monitored by PT/INR, with the frequency determined by clinical circumstances, duration of use, and stability of monitoring results. Adverse consequences may result from multiple medication interactions, which may significantly increase the PT/INR to levels associated with life-threatening bleeding, decrease the PT/INR to ineffective levels, or increase/decrease the serum concentration of the interacting medication.

    Labor, obstetric delivery, pregnancy

    Warfarin is contraindicated during pregnancy and in women who may become pregnant except in pregnant women with mechanical heart valves, who are at high risk of thromboembolism, and for whom the benefits of warfarin therapy may outweigh the risks. If warfarin is used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to a fetus. Warfarin crosses the placenta, and fetal plasma concentrations are similar to maternal values. Warfarin embryopathy is especially prominent when taken during the first trimester after the 6th week of gestation, and may cause fetal hemorrhage and an increased risk of spontaneous abortion and fetal mortality. Exposure to warfarin during the first trimester of pregnancy caused a pattern of congenital malformations in about 5% of exposed offspring. Warfarin embryopathy is characterized by nasal hypoplasia with or without stippled epiphyses (chondrodysplasia punctata) and growth retardation (including low birth weight). Central nervous system (CNS) and eye abnormalities have also been reported, including dorsal midline dysplasia characterized by agenesis of the corpus callosum, Dandy-Walker malformation, midline cerebellar atrophy, and ventral midline dysplasia characterized by optic atrophy. Mental retardation, blindness, schizencephaly, microcephaly, hydrocephalus, and other adverse pregnancy outcomes have been reported following warfarin exposure during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. In pregnant women with mechanical heart valves, adjusted-dose heparin or adjusted-dose LWWH (e.g., enoxaparin) may be used throughout pregnancy or until the 13th week of pregnancy when therapy may be changed to warfarin until close to delivery when adjusted-dose heparin or adjusted-dose LMWH should be resumed. In women at very high risk for thromboembolism (e.g., older generation prosthesis in the mitral position or history of thromboembolism) in whom the efficacy and safety of heparin or LMWH is of concern, warfarin may be used throughout pregnancy (in addition to low-dose aspirin) and replaced by heparin or LMWH close to delivery. Warfarin should not be used during labor or immediately after obstetric delivery because of the possibility of hemorrhage.

    Children, infants, neonates

    The safety and efficacy of warfarin have not been established in neonates, infants, children, or adolescents in randomized, controlled clinical trials. However, the use of warfarin in pediatric patients is well-documented for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic events. Difficulty achieving and maintaining therapeutic PT/INR ranges in the pediatric patient has been reported. The manufacturer recommends more frequent PT/INR determinations due to the possibility of changing warfarin requirements.

    Breast-feeding

    Warfarin was not present in human milk from mothers treated with warfarin from a limited published study. Human data are available; based on published data in 15 breast-feeding mothers, warfarin was not detected in human milk. Among the 15 full-term newborns, 6 nursing infants had documented prothrombin times within the expected range. Prothrombin times were not obtained for the other 9 nursing infants. Effects in premature infants have not been evaluated. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions, including bleeding in a breast-fed infant, consider the developmental and health benefits of breast-feeding along with the mother's clinical need for warfarin and any potential adverse effects on the breast-fed infant from warfarin or the underlying maternal condition. Previous American Academy of Pediatrics considered warfarin as usually compatible with breast-feeding. Monitor breast-feeding infants for bleeding or bruising.

    Contraception requirements, pregnancy testing, reproductive risk

    Counsel patients about reproductive risk and contraception requirements during warfarin treatment. Warfarin can be teratogenic if taken by the mother during pregnancy. Females of reproductive potential are advised to use effective contraception during treatment and for at least 1 month after the final dose of warfarin. Verify the pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential with pregnancy testing prior to initiating warfarin therapy. Patients who are planning pregnancy and are receiving warfarin should be counseled regarding the risks of warfarin therapy before pregnancy occurs. If pregnancy is still desired, patients should be advised to either replace warfarin with LMWH (e.g., enoxaparin) or heparin before conception is attempted or undergo frequent pregnancy tests and substitute LWMH or heparin for warfarin as soon as pregnancy occurs.

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Severe

    ocular hemorrhage / Delayed / 3.0-11.4
    intracranial bleeding / Delayed / 0.3-0.3
    tissue necrosis / Delayed / 0-0.1
    skin necrosis / Delayed / 0-0.1
    coma / Early / Incidence not known
    exfoliative dermatitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    anaphylactoid reactions / Rapid / Incidence not known
    retroperitoneal bleeding / Delayed / Incidence not known
    GI bleeding / Delayed / Incidence not known
    cholesterol microembolization / Early / Incidence not known
    purple-toe syndrome / Delayed / Incidence not known
    teratogenesis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    spontaneous fetal abortion / Delayed / Incidence not known
    bone fractures / Delayed / Incidence not known
    calciphylaxis / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Moderate

    bleeding / Early / 6.0-39.0
    hypotension / Rapid / Incidence not known
    anemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    angina / Early / Incidence not known
    elevated hepatic enzymes / Delayed / Incidence not known
    edema / Delayed / Incidence not known
    chest pain (unspecified) / Early / Incidence not known
    jaundice / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hepatitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hematuria / Delayed / Incidence not known
    vaginal bleeding / Delayed / Incidence not known
    priapism / Early / Incidence not known

    Mild

    vomiting / Early / Incidence not known
    chills / Rapid / Incidence not known
    dysgeusia / Early / Incidence not known
    lethargy / Early / Incidence not known
    nausea / Early / Incidence not known
    diarrhea / Early / Incidence not known
    paresthesias / Delayed / Incidence not known
    alopecia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    asthenia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    fatigue / Early / Incidence not known
    pallor / Early / Incidence not known
    fever / Early / Incidence not known
    syncope / Early / Incidence not known
    dizziness / Early / Incidence not known
    malaise / Early / Incidence not known
    flatulence / Early / Incidence not known
    epistaxis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    petechiae / Delayed / Incidence not known
    headache / Early / Incidence not known
    ecchymosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    pruritus / Rapid / Incidence not known
    maculopapular rash / Early / Incidence not known
    urticaria / Rapid / Incidence not known

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Abciximab: (Moderate) The use of abciximab within 7 days of use an oral anticoagulant is contraindicated unless the patient's prothrombin time is less than or equal to 1.2 times the control value. Because abciximab inhibits platelet aggregation, additive effects may be seen when abciximab is given in combination with other agents that affect hemostasis such as other platelet inhibitors (e.g. aspirin, ASA, clopidogrel, dipyridamole, ticlopidine), thrombolytic agents (e.g. alteplase, reteplase, streptokinase), and anticoagulants (e.g., heparin, warfarin). However, in clinical trials with abciximab, aspirin and heparin were administered concomitantly. The bleeding risk is significantly increased with concurrent abciximab and thrombolytic therapy; the risks of combination therapy should be weighed against the potential benefits. The GUSTO V study evaluated reduced-dose reteplase in combination with full dose abciximab, in comparison to full dose reteplase alone in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI); all patients received concurrent aspirin and heparin therapy. The combination regimen was associated with a two-fold increase in moderate to severe non-intracranial bleeding complications, including spontaneous GI bleeding. In addition, large doses of salicylates (>= 3 to 4 g/day) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding. Although NSAIDs lacks platelet inhibitory effects, an increased risk for GI bleeding is possible when NSAIDs are administered during abciximab therapy.
    Acarbose: (Minor) One case report of an interaction between warfarin and acarbose has been published. The addition of acarbose at a dosage of 25 mg three times per day resulted in an increased INR of 4.85 within two weeks. INRs should be closely observed during the first month of acarbose or miglitol therapy.
    Acetaminophen: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear. (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Magnesium Salicylate; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) Coadministration of salicylates and warfarin may result in an increased risk of bleeding. Salicylates may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding, also has been reported with salicylates. Non-acetylated salicylates do not appear to affect platelet aggregation in the same manner as aspirin and are associated with a lower risk of bleeding when given currently with warfarin. If salicylates and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Phenyltoloxamine; Salicylamide: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine : (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine; Phenyltoloxamine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Codeine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Doxylamine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Dichloralphenazone; Isometheptene: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Diphenhydramine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Hydrocodone: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Oxycodone: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Pamabrom; Pyrilamine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Pentazocine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Propoxyphene: (Moderate) Agents that inhibit cytochrome P450 CYP isoenzymes, such as propoxyphene, may decrease the metabolism of warfarin leading to increased anticoagulation effects. (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Acetaminophen; Pseudoephedrine: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Ado-Trastuzumab emtansine: (Moderate) Use caution if coadministration of anticoagulants with ado-trastuzumab emtansine is necessary due to reports of severe and sometimes fatal hemorrhage, including intracranial bleeding, with ado-trastuzumab emtansine therapy. Consider additional monitoring when concomitant use is medically necessary. While some patients who experienced bleeding during ado-trastuzumab therapy were also receiving anticoagulation therapy, others had no known additional risk factors.
    Albendazole: (Moderate) Albendazole induces cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) and although not studied, may induce the metabolism of R-warfarin. Patients receiving albendazole in combination should be closely monitored when albendazole is prescribed. Conversely, the discontinuation of albendazole therapy may result in a reduced clearance of R-warfarin, leading to an increase in anticoagulant effect. The patient's clinical status and INR should be monitored carefully when albendazole is prescribed and on discontinuation of albendazole therapy.
    Aliskiren: (Minor) Coadministration of warfarin with aliskrien decreases the absorption (Cmax) of warfarin by up to 12%. During clinical evaluation, coadministration did not reveal any significant effect on blood coagulation parameters in tested blood samples. Nevertheless, blood coagulation markers should be closely monitored in patients taking both of these medications.
    Aliskiren; Amlodipine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with amlodipine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Minor) Coadministration of warfarin with aliskrien decreases the absorption (Cmax) of warfarin by up to 12%. During clinical evaluation, coadministration did not reveal any significant effect on blood coagulation parameters in tested blood samples. Nevertheless, blood coagulation markers should be closely monitored in patients taking both of these medications.
    Aliskiren; Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with amlodipine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Minor) Coadministration of warfarin with aliskrien decreases the absorption (Cmax) of warfarin by up to 12%. During clinical evaluation, coadministration did not reveal any significant effect on blood coagulation parameters in tested blood samples. Nevertheless, blood coagulation markers should be closely monitored in patients taking both of these medications.
    Aliskiren; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Minor) Coadministration of warfarin with aliskrien decreases the absorption (Cmax) of warfarin by up to 12%. During clinical evaluation, coadministration did not reveal any significant effect on blood coagulation parameters in tested blood samples. Nevertheless, blood coagulation markers should be closely monitored in patients taking both of these medications.
    Aliskiren; Valsartan: (Minor) Coadministration of warfarin with aliskrien decreases the absorption (Cmax) of warfarin by up to 12%. During clinical evaluation, coadministration did not reveal any significant effect on blood coagulation parameters in tested blood samples. Nevertheless, blood coagulation markers should be closely monitored in patients taking both of these medications.
    Allopurinol: (Minor) Allopurinol may interfere with the metabolism of warfarin. The INR should be monitored carefully in patients receiving oral anticoagulants when allopurinol therapy is added.
    Alpelisib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with alpelisib is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Alpelisib is a weak CYP2C9 inducer and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Alteplase: (Contraindicated) Based on the pharmacology of warfarin, other thrombolytic agents could cause additive risk of bleeding when given concurrently with warfarin. Pre-treatment with oral anticoagulants is reported to be an independent risk factor for intracranial hemorrhage in thrombolytic-treated patients. Prothrombin times stabilized during administration of both agents will change slightly when heparin is discontinued.
    Altretamine: (Moderate) Due to the thrombocytopenic effects of altretamine, an additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving concomitant anticoagulants.
    Amikacin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Amiloride: (Minor) Per the prescribing information for warfarin sodium, concomitant use of diuretics (carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, loop diuretics, osmotic diuretics, potassium-sparing diuretics, and thiazide diuretics) and warfarin may result in an increased or decreased PT/INR. Patients should be monitored for changes in the INR when either of these drugs is initiated or discontinued, or if the dosage is changed.
    Amiloride; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Minor) Per the prescribing information for warfarin sodium, concomitant use of diuretics (carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, loop diuretics, osmotic diuretics, potassium-sparing diuretics, and thiazide diuretics) and warfarin may result in an increased or decreased PT/INR. Patients should be monitored for changes in the INR when either of these drugs is initiated or discontinued, or if the dosage is changed.
    Amiodarone: (Major) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with amiodarone is necessary as concurrent use results in at least a doubling of prothrombin time, significantly increasing the INR in virtually all patients and can cause serious or potentially fatal hemorrhagic complications. Consider an empiric 33% to 50% reduction in warfarin dosage when amiodarone therapy is initiated. Intensive clinical observation for bleeding and frequent determination of PT and INR values are warranted. Amiodarone is a moderate CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. Amiodarone is also a CYP3A4/CYP1A2 inhibitor, and the R-enantiomer is a CYP3A4/CYP1A2 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. Interactions may be seen as early as 4 to 6 days or as delayed as weeks following the initial administration of the drugs in combination. Given the extremely long half-life of amiodarone, the interaction may persist for weeks or even months after discontinuation of amiodarone.
    Amlodipine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with amlodipine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Amlodipine; Atorvastatin: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with amlodipine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Moderate) Per the manufacturer of atorvastatin, a clinically significant effect on the prothrombin time when atorvastatin is administered to patients receiving chronic warfarin therapy has not been documented. In a study by the manufacturer, patients chronically maintained on warfarin were administered atorvastatin (80 mg/day) for 2 weeks. Mean prothrombin times decreased slightly, but only for the first few days of treatment. Per prescribing information for warfarin sodium (Coumadin), however, all HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), including atorvastatin, have been associated with potentiation of warfarin's clinical effect. In patients taking atorvastatin, it may be prudent to monitor the INR at baseline, at initiation of atorvastatin, and after subsequent dosage changes. Adjust warfarin dosage based on INR and clinical response. Once a stable INR is documented, the INR can be monitored at the intervals otherwise recommended based on the indication for anticoagulation and co-existing conditions.
    Amlodipine; Benazepril: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with amlodipine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Amlodipine; Celecoxib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with amlodipine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Amlodipine; Olmesartan: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with amlodipine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Amlodipine; Valsartan: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with amlodipine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Amlodipine; Valsartan; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with amlodipine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Amobarbital: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with barbiturates is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Barbiturates are CYP1A2 and moderate CYP2C9/CYP3A4 inducers and warfarin's enantiomers are substrates of CYP1A2/CYP2C9/CYP3A4. Discontinuation of a barbiturate during warfarin therapy has led to fatal bleeding episodes when the hepatic enzyme-inducing properties of the barbiturate subside. Clinicians should note that warfarin doses will require readjustment if a barbiturate is added or discontinued during warfarin therapy. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary within 2 weeks of beginning barbiturate treatment, but the effect of the barbiturate on warfarin metabolism may persist for more than a month after discontinuing the barbiturate.
    Amoxicillin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including penicillins, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Amoxicillin; Clarithromycin; Omeprazole: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with clarithromycin is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Clarithromycin is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including penicillins, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Amoxicillin; Clavulanic Acid: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including penicillins, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Ampicillin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including penicillins, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Ampicillin; Sulbactam: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including penicillins, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Anagrelide: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with anagrelide is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Anagrelide is a CYP1A2 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP1A2 substrate. Since anagrelide inhibits platelet aggregation at high doses, additive risk for bleeding is possible when anagrelide is given in combination with anticoagulants such as warfarin. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Antithrombin III: (Major) As a regulator of hemostasis, antithrombin III (AT III) may increase bleeding risk in patients receiving warfarin concomitantly. The half-life of AT III may be altered during concomitant administration with anticoagulants. Patients should be monitored for appropriate anticoagulation during coadministration of AT III and coumarin anticoagulants.
    Apalutamide: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with apalutamide is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Apalutamide is a weak CYP2C9 and strong CYP3A4 inducer and the enantiomers of warfarin are CYP2C9/CYP3A4 substrates.
    Apixaban: (Major) Avoid concomitant use of apixaban and with other anticoagulants due to the increased risk for bleeding. Short-term overlaps in anticoagulation therapy may be necessary for patients transitioning from one anticoagulant to another. Monitor patients closely and promptly evaluate any signs or symptoms of bleeding if the use of multiple anticoagulants is necessary. Additionally, apixaban may increase INR.
    Aprepitant, Fosaprepitant: (Moderate) INR should be closely monitored during the 2-week period (particularly at 7 to 10 days) after the initiation of an aprepitant or fosaprepitant dosage regimen cycle, regardless of the indication or dose. An increase or decrease in the exposure of warfarin is possible, leading to an increase in the risk of bleeding or reduction in efficacy. Aprepitant and fosaprepitant are weak inducers of CYP2C9 and warfarin is a CYP2C9 substrate. Coadministration may result in a decrease in warfarin exposure leading to reduced efficacy. Studies have noted a 34% decrease in S-warfarin trough concentrations, accompanied by a 14% decrease in the INR at 5 days after completion of a 3-day regimen of aprepitant (125 mg/80 mg/80 mg) given to healthy patients on stabilized chronic warfarin therapy, although there was no effect on the plasma AUC of R(+) or S(-) warfarin. Additionally, aprepitant and fosaprepitant are moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors and warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. This may increase warfarin exposure leading to increased risk of bleeding.
    Argatroban: (Major) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving other anticoagulants (e.g., heparin, warfarin) in combination with argatroban.
    Armodafinil: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with armodafinil is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Armodafinil is a weak CYP3A4 inducer and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Ascorbic Acid, Vitamin C: (Minor) Monitor INR as per current standards of care when patients take vitamin C with warfarin. Limited case reports have suggested that high doses of ascorbic acid with warfarin may decrease the anticoagulation effects of warfarin. However, controlled studies have not confirmed an interaction. No effect was observed in patients on warfarin therapy treated with ascorbic acid doses up to 1,000 mg/day for 2 weeks.
    Aspirin, ASA: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear. (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with barbiturates is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Barbiturates are CYP1A2 and moderate CYP2C9/CYP3A4 inducers and warfarin's enantiomers are substrates of CYP1A2/CYP2C9/CYP3A4. Discontinuation of a barbiturate during warfarin therapy has led to fatal bleeding episodes when the hepatic enzyme-inducing properties of the barbiturate subside. Clinicians should note that warfarin doses will require readjustment if a barbiturate is added or discontinued during warfarin therapy. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary within 2 weeks of beginning barbiturate treatment, but the effect of the barbiturate on warfarin metabolism may persist for more than a month after discontinuing the barbiturate.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear. (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with barbiturates is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Barbiturates are CYP1A2 and moderate CYP2C9/CYP3A4 inducers and warfarin's enantiomers are substrates of CYP1A2/CYP2C9/CYP3A4. Discontinuation of a barbiturate during warfarin therapy has led to fatal bleeding episodes when the hepatic enzyme-inducing properties of the barbiturate subside. Clinicians should note that warfarin doses will require readjustment if a barbiturate is added or discontinued during warfarin therapy. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary within 2 weeks of beginning barbiturate treatment, but the effect of the barbiturate on warfarin metabolism may persist for more than a month after discontinuing the barbiturate.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Orphenadrine: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear.
    Aspirin, ASA; Carisoprodol: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear.
    Aspirin, ASA; Carisoprodol; Codeine: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear.
    Aspirin, ASA; Citric Acid; Sodium Bicarbonate: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear.
    Aspirin, ASA; Dipyridamole: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear. (Moderate) Because dipyridamole is a platelet inhibitor, there is a potential additive risk for bleeding if dipyridamole is given in combination with other agents that affect hemostasis. Per the manufacturer, dipyridamole does not influence prothrombin time or activity when administered with warfarin; bleeding frequency and severity are similar when dipyridamole is administered with or without warfarin. In rare cases, however, increased bleeding has been observed during or after surgery. Regardless, caution is advised as both anticoagulants including warfarin and platelet inhibitors such as dipyridamole affect hemostasis and combination therapy could increase the risk of bleeding.
    Aspirin, ASA; Omeprazole: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear.
    Aspirin, ASA; Oxycodone: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear.
    Aspirin, ASA; Pravastatin: (Major) Co-administration of aspirin and warfarin is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Consider alternate therapy for aspirin for analgesic or antipyretic uses. If aspirin and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. Gastrointestinal irritation and impaired hemostasis secondary to platelet inhibition have been observed with relatively small doses of aspirin. In addition, aspirin may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Large doses (more than 3 to 4 g/day) of aspirin can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding; hypoprothrombinemia has also been reported with aspirin doses less than 2 g/day. Lower doses (less than 100 mg) of aspirin are recommended for use in combination with aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in specific cases, including in patients with mechanical mitral or aortic valve or atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention or revascularization. The addition of warfarin to aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction should be limited to situations where the risk of systemic or venous thromboembolism or stent thrombosis is considered to exceed that of bleeding. Data regarding the benefit vs. risk of combination therapy for other cardiovascular conditions remains unclear. (Moderate) Coadministration of pravastatin (40 mg) has been reported to have no clinically significant effect on prothrombin time in normal elderly subjects previously stabilized on warfarin. However, per prescribing information for warfarin sodium (Coumadin), all HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), including pravastatin, have been associated with potentiation of warfarin's clinical effect. However, it appears that pravastatin may be less likely to significantly interact with warfarin based on drug interaction studies. In general, it is prudent to monitor INR at baseline, at initiation of pravastatin, and after subsequent dosage changes. Adjust warfarin dosage based on INR and clinical response. Once a stable INR is documented, the INR can be monitored at the intervals otherwise recommended based on the indication for anticoagulation and co-existing conditions.
    Atazanavir: (Moderate) Monitor the INR and adjust the dose as necessary if warfarin is coadministered with atazanavir. Concurrent use may increase the INR and the risk of bleeding. Atazanavir is a CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a 3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Atazanavir; Cobicistat: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with cobicistat is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Cobicistat is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Moderate) Monitor the INR and adjust the dose as necessary if warfarin is coadministered with atazanavir. Concurrent use may increase the INR and the risk of bleeding. Atazanavir is a CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a 3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Atenolol: (Minor) Atenolol has been associated with elevations in the INR in some patients when used in combination with warfarin. Atenolol does not appear to cause changes in warfarin elimination half-life, and studies suggest there is a slight alteration in warfarin AUC. Patients should be monitored for changes in the INR when either of these drugs is initiated or discontinued, or if the dosage is changed.
    Atenolol; Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Chlorthalidone has been associated with a decreased anticoagulation response to warfarin. Monitor coagulation parameters and adjust warfarin dosage as needed. (Minor) Atenolol has been associated with elevations in the INR in some patients when used in combination with warfarin. Atenolol does not appear to cause changes in warfarin elimination half-life, and studies suggest there is a slight alteration in warfarin AUC. Patients should be monitored for changes in the INR when either of these drugs is initiated or discontinued, or if the dosage is changed.
    Atorvastatin: (Moderate) Per the manufacturer of atorvastatin, a clinically significant effect on the prothrombin time when atorvastatin is administered to patients receiving chronic warfarin therapy has not been documented. In a study by the manufacturer, patients chronically maintained on warfarin were administered atorvastatin (80 mg/day) for 2 weeks. Mean prothrombin times decreased slightly, but only for the first few days of treatment. Per prescribing information for warfarin sodium (Coumadin), however, all HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), including atorvastatin, have been associated with potentiation of warfarin's clinical effect. In patients taking atorvastatin, it may be prudent to monitor the INR at baseline, at initiation of atorvastatin, and after subsequent dosage changes. Adjust warfarin dosage based on INR and clinical response. Once a stable INR is documented, the INR can be monitored at the intervals otherwise recommended based on the indication for anticoagulation and co-existing conditions.
    Atorvastatin; Ezetimibe: (Moderate) Coadministration with ezetimibe has not demonstrated significant effects on the bioavailability or the anticoagulant effects of warfarin when studied in 12 healthy adult males. However, according to the manufacturer, increases in PT/INR have been reported and accordingly recommends that if ezetimibe is added to warfarin, the INR should be monitored. (Moderate) Per the manufacturer of atorvastatin, a clinically significant effect on the prothrombin time when atorvastatin is administered to patients receiving chronic warfarin therapy has not been documented. In a study by the manufacturer, patients chronically maintained on warfarin were administered atorvastatin (80 mg/day) for 2 weeks. Mean prothrombin times decreased slightly, but only for the first few days of treatment. Per prescribing information for warfarin sodium (Coumadin), however, all HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), including atorvastatin, have been associated with potentiation of warfarin's clinical effect. In patients taking atorvastatin, it may be prudent to monitor the INR at baseline, at initiation of atorvastatin, and after subsequent dosage changes. Adjust warfarin dosage based on INR and clinical response. Once a stable INR is documented, the INR can be monitored at the intervals otherwise recommended based on the indication for anticoagulation and co-existing conditions.
    Atovaquone; Proguanil: (Moderate) The anticoagulant effects of warfarin and other coumarin-based anticoagulants may be increased when used concomitantly with proguanil; the mechanism of the interaction is not known. If proguanil is initiated in someone receiving warfarin, monitor the patient closely for an increased INR or symptoms of bleeding.
    Avacopan: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with avacopan is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. The R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A substrate and avacopan is a weak CYP3A inhibitor. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Azathioprine: (Moderate) Azathioprine decreases warfarin serum concentrations and the INR and thus increases warfarin dosage requirements. If azathioprine is discontinued in a patient stabilized on warfarin, an increased risk of bleeding may occur. It is prudent to monitor the INR and response to warfarin prior to azathioprine initiation, frequently following initiation of azathioprine therapy, and again on azathioprine cessation. Adjust warfarin dosage based on INR and clinical response.
    Azilsartan; Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Chlorthalidone has been associated with a decreased anticoagulation response to warfarin. Monitor coagulation parameters and adjust warfarin dosage as needed.
    Azithromycin: (Moderate) Carefully monitor the PT/INR in patients who receive warfarin and azithromycin concomitantly. Postmarketing reports suggest that concomitant administration of azithromycin may potentiate the effects of oral warfarin, although the prothrombin time was not affected in the dedicated drug interaction study with azithromycin and warfarin.
    Aztreonam: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including aztreonam, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Balsalazide: (Moderate) Increased prothrombin time in patients taking concomitant 5-aminosalicylates and warfarin has been reported. Closely monitor patients PT and INR during and following concomitant balsalazide therapy; dosage adjustments of anticoagulants may be necessary.
    Barbiturates: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with barbiturates is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Barbiturates are CYP1A2 and moderate CYP2C9/CYP3A4 inducers and warfarin's enantiomers are substrates of CYP1A2/CYP2C9/CYP3A4. Discontinuation of a barbiturate during warfarin therapy has led to fatal bleeding episodes when the hepatic enzyme-inducing properties of the barbiturate subside. Clinicians should note that warfarin doses will require readjustment if a barbiturate is added or discontinued during warfarin therapy. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary within 2 weeks of beginning barbiturate treatment, but the effect of the barbiturate on warfarin metabolism may persist for more than a month after discontinuing the barbiturate.
    Belladonna Alkaloids; Ergotamine; Phenobarbital: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with barbiturates is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Barbiturates are CYP1A2 and moderate CYP2C9/CYP3A4 inducers and warfarin's enantiomers are substrates of CYP1A2/CYP2C9/CYP3A4. Discontinuation of a barbiturate during warfarin therapy has led to fatal bleeding episodes when the hepatic enzyme-inducing properties of the barbiturate subside. Clinicians should note that warfarin doses will require readjustment if a barbiturate is added or discontinued during warfarin therapy. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary within 2 weeks of beginning barbiturate treatment, but the effect of the barbiturate on warfarin metabolism may persist for more than a month after discontinuing the barbiturate.
    Belumosudil: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with belumosudil is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. The R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A substrate and belumosudil is a weak CYP3A inhibitor. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Belzutifan: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with belzutifan is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. The R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A substrate and belzutifan is a CYP3A inducer. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Bempedoic Acid; Ezetimibe: (Moderate) Coadministration with ezetimibe has not demonstrated significant effects on the bioavailability or the anticoagulant effects of warfarin when studied in 12 healthy adult males. However, according to the manufacturer, increases in PT/INR have been reported and accordingly recommends that if ezetimibe is added to warfarin, the INR should be monitored.
    Benzhydrocodone; Acetaminophen: (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Berotralstat: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with berotralstat is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. The R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate and berotralstat is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Betrixaban: (Major) Avoid use of betrixaban with warfarin due to the increased bleeding risk. Monitor patients closely and promptly evaluate any signs or symptoms of bleeding if betrixaban and other anticoagulants are used concomitantly. Coadministration of betrixaban and other anticoagulants may increase the risk of bleeding. Long-term concomitant treatment with betrixaban and other anticoagulants is not recommended; short-term use may be necessary for patients transitioning to or from betrixaban.
    Bexarotene: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with bexarotene is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Bexarotene is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Bicalutamide: (Moderate) Closely monitor the PT/INR if coadministration of warfarin with bicalutamide is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. In vitro protein-binding studies have shown that bicalutamide can displace coumarin anticoagulants from binding sites. There have been reports of excessive prolongation of the PT/INR days to weeks after the introduction of bicalutamide in patients who were previously stable on coumarin anticoagulants. Some patients had serious bleeding including intracranial, retroperitoneal, and gastrointestinal requiring blood transfusion and/or administration of vitamin K. Additionally, bicalutamide is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate; the S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Bismuth Subcitrate Potassium; Metronidazole; Tetracycline: (Moderate) Monitor prothrombin time and INR and watch for signs of bleeding with concomitant use of systemic metronidazole and warfarin. Warfarin dose adjustments may be necessary. Metronidazole can potentiate the anticoagulant effect of warfarin, resulting in prolongation of prothrombin time and increased risk of bleeding.
    Bismuth Subsalicylate: (Moderate) Coadministration of salicylates and warfarin may result in an increased risk of bleeding. Salicylates may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding, also has been reported with salicylates. Non-acetylated salicylates do not appear to affect platelet aggregation in the same manner as aspirin and are associated with a lower risk of bleeding when given currently with warfarin. If salicylates and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding.
    Bismuth Subsalicylate; Metronidazole; Tetracycline: (Moderate) Coadministration of salicylates and warfarin may result in an increased risk of bleeding. Salicylates may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding, also has been reported with salicylates. Non-acetylated salicylates do not appear to affect platelet aggregation in the same manner as aspirin and are associated with a lower risk of bleeding when given currently with warfarin. If salicylates and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding. (Moderate) Monitor prothrombin time and INR and watch for signs of bleeding with concomitant use of systemic metronidazole and warfarin. Warfarin dose adjustments may be necessary. Metronidazole can potentiate the anticoagulant effect of warfarin, resulting in prolongation of prothrombin time and increased risk of bleeding.
    Bivalirudin: (Minor) Based on the pharmacology of warfarin, other anticoagulants cause additive risk of bleeding when given concurrently with warfarin. Bivalirudin affects the International Normalized Ratio (INR). INR measurements made in patients being treated with bivalirudin may not be useful for determining the appropriate warfarin dose.
    Blinatumomab: (Moderate) No drug interaction studies have been performed with blinatumomab. The drug may cause a transient release of cytokines leading to an inhibition of CYP450 enzymes. The interaction risk with CYP450 substrates is likely the highest during the first 9 days of the first cycle and the first 2 days of the second cycle. Monitor patients receiving concurrent CYP450 substrates that have a narrow therapeutic index (NTI) such as warfarin. The dose of the concomitant drug may need to be adjusted.
    Boceprevir: (Moderate) Monitoring of the international normalized ratio (INR) is advised when administering warfarin with boceprevir due to an increased potential for warfarin-related adverse events, such as bleeding or thrombosis. If warfarin dose adjustments are made, re-adjust the dose upon completion of boceprevir treatment. Predictions about the interaction can be made based on the metabolic pathway of warfarin. Warfarin is partially metabolized by the hepatic isoenzyme CYP3A4; boceprevir inhibits this isoenzyme. Coadministration may result in altered warfarin plasma concentrations.
    Bosentan: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with bosentan is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Bosentan is a moderate CYP2C9/CYP3A4 inducer and the enantiomers of warfarin are substrates of CYP2C9/CYP3A4. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Brigatinib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with brigatinib is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Brigatinib is a weak CYP3A4 inducer and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Brodalumab: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with brodalumab is necessary due to the potential for decreased warfarin efficacy; adjust the dose of warfarin as necessary. Inhibition of IL-17 signaling by brodalumab may restore CYP450 activities to higher levels leading to increased metabolism of drugs that are CYP450 substrates as compared to metabolism prior to treatment. Therefore, CYP450 substrates with a narrow therapeutic indie, such as warfarin, may have fluctuations in drug levels and therapeutic effect when brodalumab therapy is started or discontinued. This effect on CYP450 enzyme activity may persist for several weeks after stopping brodalumab.
    Bupivacaine; Meloxicam: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Bupropion: (Moderate) When bupropion is used for smoking cessation, be aware that changes in the INR may occur in patients previously stabilized on warfarin as tobacco smoking is reduced or halted, as smoking affects CYP1A2, one of the enzymes involved in warfarin metabolism. Physiological changes resulting from smoking cessation, with or without treatment with bupropion, may alter the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of certain drugs (e.g.,warfarin) for which dosage adjustment may be necessary. A case report of potential interaction with warfarin and bupropion used for depression has been reported; when bupropion was abruptly halted in the patient prior to surgery, the patient's INR increased to 8.0. The authors could not discern a probable mechanism for the potential interaction, but the patient was also reducing his daily tobacco smoking status, Patients who are receiving warfarin with bupropion should be carefully monitored if the patient is also altering their smoking status.
    Bupropion; Naltrexone: (Moderate) When bupropion is used for smoking cessation, be aware that changes in the INR may occur in patients previously stabilized on warfarin as tobacco smoking is reduced or halted, as smoking affects CYP1A2, one of the enzymes involved in warfarin metabolism. Physiological changes resulting from smoking cessation, with or without treatment with bupropion, may alter the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of certain drugs (e.g.,warfarin) for which dosage adjustment may be necessary. A case report of potential interaction with warfarin and bupropion used for depression has been reported; when bupropion was abruptly halted in the patient prior to surgery, the patient's INR increased to 8.0. The authors could not discern a probable mechanism for the potential interaction, but the patient was also reducing his daily tobacco smoking status, Patients who are receiving warfarin with bupropion should be carefully monitored if the patient is also altering their smoking status.
    Butabarbital: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with barbiturates is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Barbiturates are CYP1A2 and moderate CYP2C9/CYP3A4 inducers and warfarin's enantiomers are substrates of CYP1A2/CYP2C9/CYP3A4. Discontinuation of a barbiturate during warfarin therapy has led to fatal bleeding episodes when the hepatic enzyme-inducing properties of the barbiturate subside. Clinicians should note that warfarin doses will require readjustment if a barbiturate is added or discontinued during warfarin therapy. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary within 2 weeks of beginning barbiturate treatment, but the effect of the barbiturate on warfarin metabolism may persist for more than a month after discontinuing the barbiturate.
    Butalbital; Acetaminophen: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with barbiturates is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Barbiturates are CYP1A2 and moderate CYP2C9/CYP3A4 inducers and warfarin's enantiomers are substrates of CYP1A2/CYP2C9/CYP3A4. Discontinuation of a barbiturate during warfarin therapy has led to fatal bleeding episodes when the hepatic enzyme-inducing properties of the barbiturate subside. Clinicians should note that warfarin doses will require readjustment if a barbiturate is added or discontinued during warfarin therapy. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary within 2 weeks of beginning barbiturate treatment, but the effect of the barbiturate on warfarin metabolism may persist for more than a month after discontinuing the barbiturate. (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Butalbital; Acetaminophen; Caffeine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with barbiturates is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Barbiturates are CYP1A2 and moderate CYP2C9/CYP3A4 inducers and warfarin's enantiomers are substrates of CYP1A2/CYP2C9/CYP3A4. Discontinuation of a barbiturate during warfarin therapy has led to fatal bleeding episodes when the hepatic enzyme-inducing properties of the barbiturate subside. Clinicians should note that warfarin doses will require readjustment if a barbiturate is added or discontinued during warfarin therapy. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary within 2 weeks of beginning barbiturate treatment, but the effect of the barbiturate on warfarin metabolism may persist for more than a month after discontinuing the barbiturate. (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Butalbital; Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Codeine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with barbiturates is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Barbiturates are CYP1A2 and moderate CYP2C9/CYP3A4 inducers and warfarin's enantiomers are substrates of CYP1A2/CYP2C9/CYP3A4. Discontinuation of a barbiturate during warfarin therapy has led to fatal bleeding episodes when the hepatic enzyme-inducing properties of the barbiturate subside. Clinicians should note that warfarin doses will require readjustment if a barbiturate is added or discontinued during warfarin therapy. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary within 2 weeks of beginning barbiturate treatment, but the effect of the barbiturate on warfarin metabolism may persist for more than a month after discontinuing the barbiturate. (Minor) Although acetaminophen is routinely considered safer than aspirin and agent of choice when a mild analgesic/antipyretic is necessary for a patient receiving therapy with warfarin, acetaminophen has also been shown to augment the hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin. Concomitant acetaminophen ingestion may result in increases in the INR in a dose-related fashion. Clinical bleeding has been reported. Single doses or short (i.e., several days) courses of treatment with acetaminophen are probably safe in most patients taking warfarin. Clinicians should be alert for an increased INR if acetaminophen is administered in large daily doses for longer than 10 to 14 days.
    Calcium Carbonate; Famotidine; Magnesium Hydroxide: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with famotidine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Famotidine is a CYP1A2 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP1A2 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Canakinumab: (Moderate) Monitor the INR if canakinumab is coadministered with warfarin due to the potential for decreased warfarin efficacy; adjust the dose of warfarin as necessary. Inhibition of IL-1 signaling by canakinumab may restore CYP450 activities to higher levels leading to increased metabolism of drugs that are CYP450 substrates as compared to metabolism prior to treatment. Therefore, CYP450 substrates with a narrow therapeutic index, such as warfarin, may have fluctuations in drug levels and therapeutic effect when canakinumab therapy is started or discontinued. This effect on CYP450 enzyme activity may persist for several weeks after stopping canakinumab.
    Cannabidiol: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with cannabidiol is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Cannabidiol is a CYP2C9 and weak CYP1A2 inhibitor. The R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP1A2 substrate and generally has a slower clearance than the S-enantiomer. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer and is metabolized by CYP2C9.
    Capecitabine: (Major) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with capecitabine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Coadministration of warfarin and capecitabine has been reported to cause altered coagulation parameters and bleeding, including death. The effects of the interaction may occur within days to several months after starting or 1 month after stopping capecitabine therapy. Capecitabine is a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. Additionally, age greater than 60 and a diagnosis of cancer independently predispose patients to an increased risk of coagulopathy.
    Caplacizumab: (Moderate) Assess and monitor closely for bleeding with concomitant use of caplacizumab and anticoagulants. Concomitant use of caplacizumab with any anticoagulant may increase the risk of bleeding. Interrupt caplacizumab use if clinically significant bleeding occurs.
    Capmatinib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with capmatinib is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin, leading to increased bleeding risk. Capmatinib is a CYP1A2 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP1A2 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Carbamazepine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with carbamazepine is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Carbamazepine is a CYP1A2, moderate CYP2C9, and strong CYP3A4 inducer and the enantiomers of warfarin are CYP1A2/CYP2C9/CYP3A4 substrates. If carbamazepine is discontinued, dosage reductions of warfarin may be necessary.
    Carbenicillin: (Moderate) Some penicillins (e.g., carbenicillin) can inhibit platelet aggregation, which may increase the risk of bleeding with any anticoagulants. Clinically important bleeding of this type is relatively rare. The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including penicillins, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary in patients receiving warfarin.
    Carbidopa; Levodopa; Entacapone: (Moderate) Monitoring of the INR is recommended when entacapone treatment is initiated or when the dose is increased for patients receiving warfarin. Cases of significantly increased INR in patients concomitantly using warfarin have been reported during the postapproval use of entacapone. Entacapone has affinity for CYP2C9. In an interaction study in healthy volunteers, entacapone did not significantly change the plasma levels of S-warfarin while the AUC for R-warfarin increased on average by 18% (Cl 90 11% to 26%), and the INR values increased on average by 13% (Cl 90 6% to 19%).
    Cefaclor: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefadroxil: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefazolin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefdinir: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefditoren: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefepime: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefiderocol: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefixime: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefoperazone: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefotaxime: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefotetan: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefoxitin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefpodoxime: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefprozil: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Ceftaroline: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Ceftazidime: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Ceftazidime; Avibactam: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Ceftibuten: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Ceftizoxime: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Ceftolozane; Tazobactam: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Ceftriaxone: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cefuroxime: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Celecoxib: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Cenobamate: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with cenobamate is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Cenobamate is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Cephalexin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cephalosporins: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cephalothin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Cephradine: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including cephalosporins, may increase the INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Additionally, certain cephalosporins (cefotetan, cefoperazone, cefamandole) are associated with prolongation of the prothrombin time due to the methylthiotetrazole (MTT) side chain at the R2 position, which disturbs the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Ceritinib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with ceritinib is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Ceritinib is a strong CYP3A4 and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. Ceritinib is also a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Chenodiol: (Moderate) Due to its potential for hepatotoxicity, chenodiol may affect the pharmacodynamics of warfarin. Patients with hepatic impairment may require a lower dosage of warfarin due to decreased warfarin metabolism and decreased production of coagulation factors. Coadministration with chenodiol can cause prolongation of the prothrombin time and increase the risk of bleeding. Monitor patients on concomitant therapy carefully. If prolongation of prothrombin time is observed, the warfarin dosage should be adjusted as needed to produce a prothrombin time 1.5 to 2 times normal. If necessary, discontinue chenodiol therapy.
    Chloral Hydrate: (Minor) Chloral hydrate may enhance the anticoagulation effects of warfarin. Trichloroacetic acid, a metabolite of chloral hydrate displaces warfarin from its binding sites. The effect on warfarin anticoagulation is usually small and transient.
    Chlorambucil: (Moderate) Due to the thrombocytopenic effects of chlorambucil, an additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving concomitant anticoagulants.
    Chlordiazepoxide: (Moderate) Chlordiazepoxide has been associated with a decreased anticoagulation response to warfarin. Monitor coagulation parameters and adjust warfarin dosage as needed.
    Chlordiazepoxide; Amitriptyline: (Moderate) Chlordiazepoxide has been associated with a decreased anticoagulation response to warfarin. Monitor coagulation parameters and adjust warfarin dosage as needed.
    Chlordiazepoxide; Clidinium: (Moderate) Chlordiazepoxide has been associated with a decreased anticoagulation response to warfarin. Monitor coagulation parameters and adjust warfarin dosage as needed.
    Chlorpheniramine; Ibuprofen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Chlorthalidone: (Moderate) Chlorthalidone has been associated with a decreased anticoagulation response to warfarin. Monitor coagulation parameters and adjust warfarin dosage as needed.
    Chlorthalidone; Clonidine: (Moderate) Chlorthalidone has been associated with a decreased anticoagulation response to warfarin. Monitor coagulation parameters and adjust warfarin dosage as needed.
    Cholestyramine: (Major) Cholestyramine can either increase or decrease the hypoprothrombinemic actions of warfarin. Cholestyramine can bind with vitamin K in the diet, impairing vitamin K absorption, which, in turn, may increase warfarin's hypoprothrombinemic effect. Conversely, cholestyramine can bind with warfarin directly and impair warfarin bioavailability. To prevent altering warfarin pharmacokinetics, doses of warfarin and cholestyramine should be staggered by at least 4 to 6 hours. Cholestyramine should be prescribed cautiously to any patient receiving warfarin since cholestyramine may enhance systemic warfarin clearance.
    Choline Salicylate; Magnesium Salicylate: (Moderate) Coadministration of salicylates and warfarin may result in an increased risk of bleeding. Salicylates may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding, also has been reported with salicylates. Non-acetylated salicylates do not appear to affect platelet aggregation in the same manner as aspirin and are associated with a lower risk of bleeding when given currently with warfarin. If salicylates and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding.
    Chondroitin; Glucosamine: (Moderate) Case reports have reported a possible interaction between chondroitin; glucosamine and warfarin or other coumarin anticoagulants, resulting in an increase in INR and a need for warfarin dosage adjustment. In one case report, the patient was taking twice the recommended dosage of a popular chondroitin; glucosamine supplement (Cosamin DS). Controlled clinical trials of chondroitin; glucosamine for the treatment of osteoarthritis have not reported drug interactions with oral anticoagulants at typical dosages of up to 1500 mg glucosamine; 1200 mg chondroitin/day PO. However, drug interactions with these supplements have not been specifically studied. Until more is known regarding the potential for chondroitin or glucosamine to interact with warfarin, it may be prudent to closely monitor patients stabilized on warfarin if these dietary supplements are added to their therapy regimen.
    Cilostazol: (Moderate) The safety of cilostazol has not been established with concomitant administration of heparin, other anticoagulants, or thrombolytic agents. Because cilostazol is a platelet aggregation inhibitor, concomitant administration with similar acting drugs could theoretically result in an increased risk of bleeding due to additive pharmacodynamic effects, and combinations of these agents should be approached with caution. While both cilostazol and warfarin are metabolized by cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 and CYP2C19, administration of cilostazol with a single dose of warfarin (25 mg) in healthy volunteers did not affect warfarin metabolism or effect changes in pro-times, bleeding times, or platelet aggregation. However, the effect of concomitant multiple dosing of cilostazol and warfarin has not been evaluated. Patients on anticoagulants should be monitored for changes in response to anticoagulation therapy if cilostazol is administered concurrently. Regularly monitor the INR and other clinical parameters during the chronic concomitant administration of warfarin and cilostazol. Although the risk of bleeding is increased when clopidogrel is used concomitantly with thrombolytic agents, it is common to see patients receive these drugs simultaneously.
    Cimetidine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with cimetidine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Cimetidine is a CYP1A2 and weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP1A2/CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Ciprofloxacin: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with ciprofloxacin is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Ciprofloxacin is a CYP1A2 and moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP1A2/CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. Interactions may be particularly problematic in the elderly.
    Cisapride: (Moderate) Data indicate that administration of cisapride to patients receiving oral anticoagulants (e.g., warfarin) may cause a prolongation in the prothrombin time and increase the INR. When using cisapride with warfarin, monitor the coagulation time during the initiation and discontinuation of cisapride. Warfarin dose adjustment may be necessary.
    Citalopram: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with citalopram is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Citalopram is a CYP1A2 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP1A2 substrate. Prothrombin time was increased by 5% when citalopram was coadministered with warfarin; the clinical significance is unknown. An increased risk of bleeding, including gastrointestinal bleeding, has been reported with drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake; thus, concurrent use of citalopram and warfarin may result in an additive risk of bleeding events. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Clarithromycin: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with clarithromycin is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Clarithromycin is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Clobazam: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with clobazam is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Clobazam is a weak CYP3A4 inducer and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Clofarabine: (Moderate) Due to the thrombocytopenic effects of clofarabine, an additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving concomitant anticoagulants.
    Clofazimine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with clofazimine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Clofazimine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Clopidogrel: (Moderate) Carefully monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding during coadministration of warfarin and clopidogrel. Both agents independently affect hemostasis.
    Clozapine: (Moderate) The protein binding of clozapine is 97%; highly protein-bound medications can displace clozapine from its binding sites, predominantly alpha-1-acid glycoprotein. Clozapine, in turn, can increase the serum concentrations of digoxin or warfarin. Closely observe patients on other highly protein-bound drugs for an increased incidence of adverse effects.
    Cobicistat: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with cobicistat is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Cobicistat is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Cocaine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with cocaine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Cocaine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Co-Enzyme Q10, Ubiquinone: (Moderate) Co-enzyme Q10, ubiquinone is structurally similar to vitamin K; a decreased response to warfarin has been noted if this dietary supplement is taken. Avoid concurrent use when possible. If co-enzyme Q10 is taken concurrently with warfarin, monitor INR and adjust warfarin dosage to attain clinical and anticoagulant endpoints.
    Colesevelam: (Moderate) Cholestyramine can decrease warfarin absorption. Staggering the doses of cholestyramine and warfarin is recommended but this may not completely avoid a drug interaction. Cholestyramine has also been shown to enhance the clearance of IV warfarin. Thus, it is theoretically possible that cholestyramine may interfere with the actions of warfarin after warfarin has been absorbed. Colestipol may be an acceptable alternative to cholestyramine in patients receiving warfarin, although, both cholestyramine and colestipol can decrease vitamin K absorption from the gut, which may indirectly affect the clinical response to warfarin. Colesevelam may also decrease vitamin K absorption from the gut and interfere with the clinical effects of warfarin.
    Colestipol: (Major) Colestipol may affect the hypoprothrombinemic actions of warfarin. Colestipol can bind with vitamin K in the diet, impairing vitamin K absorption, which, in turn, may increase warfarin's hypoprothrombinemic effect. Conversely, colestipol can bind with warfarin directly and impair warfarin bioavailability, although the effects of colestipol on warfarin absorption are less pronounced than the ability of cholestyramine to bind with warfarin. To avoid altering warfarin pharmacokinetics, doses of warfarin and colestipol should be staggered by at least 4-6 hours. Colestipol should be prescribed cautiously to any patient receiving warfarin, although colestipol may be an acceptable alternative to cholestyramine in a patient receiving warfarin who also requires therapy with a bile acid sequestrant.
    Colistimethate, Colistin, Polymyxin E: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many antibiotics, including colistimethate sodium, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Collagenase: (Moderate) Cautious use of injectable collagenase by patients taking anticoagulants is advised. The efficacy and safety of administering injectable collagenase to a patient taking an anticoagulant within 7 days before the injection are unknown. Receipt of injectable collagenase may cause an ecchymosis or bleeding at the injection site.
    Conivaptan: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with conivaptan is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. The R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A substrate and conivaptan is a moderate CYP3A inhibitor. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Corticosteroids: (Moderate) Monitor the INR if warfarin is administered with corticosteroids. The effect of corticosteroids on warfarin is variable. There are reports of enhanced as well as diminished effects of anticoagulants when given concurrently with corticosteroids; however, limited published data exist, and the mechanism of the interaction is not well described. High-dose corticosteroids appear to pose a greater risk for increased anticoagulant effect. In addition, corticosteroids have been associated with a risk of peptic ulcer and gastrointestinal bleeding.
    Crizotinib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with crizotinib is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Crizotinib is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Cyclophosphamide: (Moderate) Monitor the PT/INR in patients receiving cyclophosphamide with warfarin therapy; both increased and decreased warfarin effect have been reported in patients receiving concomitant therapy.
    Cyclosporine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with cyclosporine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Cyclosporine is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Cytarabine, ARA-C: (Moderate) Due to the thrombocytopenic effects of pyrimidine analogs, an additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving concomitant anticoagulants.
    Dabigatran: (Major) Avoid use of dabigatran with warfarin due to the increased bleeding risk. Monitor patients closely and promptly evaluate any signs or symptoms of bleeding if dabigatran and other anticoagulants are used concomitantly. Coadministration of dabigatran and other anticoagulants may increase the risk of bleeding. Long-term concomitant treatment with dabigatran and other anticoagulants is not recommended; short-term use may be necessary for patients transitioning to or from dabigatran.
    Dabrafenib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with dabrafenib is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Dabrafenib is a weak CYP2C9 and moderate CYP3A4 inducer and the enantiomers of warfarin are substrates of CYP2C9/CYP3A4. In a drug interaction study, administration of dabrafenib 150 mg twice daily for 15 days with a single 15 mg-dose of warfarin decreased the AUC of S-warfarin (a CYP2C9 substrate) by 37% and decreased the AUC of R-warfarin (a CYP3A4 substrate) by 33%.
    Daclatasvir: (Moderate) Fluctuations in International Normalized Ratio (INR) have been observed in warfarin recipients who were also receiving treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, including daclatasvir. It is recommended to closely monitor these patients for changes in INR both during and after discontinuation of the HCV treatment regimen.
    Dalfopristin; Quinupristin: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with streptogramins, like quinupristin, is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Streptogramins, like quinupristin, are weak CYP3A4 inhibitors and warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR.
    Dalteparin: (Major) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving other anticoagulants (e.g., heparin, warfarin) in combination with dalteparin.
    Danaparoid: (Contraindicated) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving warfarin in combination with danaparoid. Monitoring of anticoagulant therapy by prothrombin time and Thrombotest is unreliable within 5 hours after danaparoid administration.
    Danazol: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with danazol is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Danazol is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Daptomycin: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding during coadministration. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary. The concomitant use of warfarin with antibiotics may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. In 16 healthy adults, a 5-day daptomycin course coadministered with a single oral dose of warfarin (25 mg) on the fifth day had no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of either drug and did not significantly alter the INR; however, there are no data describing concurrent use beyond a single warfarin dose.
    Darunavir: (Moderate) Monitor the INR and adjust the dose as necessary if warfarin is coadministered with darunavir. Concurrent use may increase the INR and the risk of bleeding. Darunavir is a CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a 3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Darunavir; Cobicistat: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with cobicistat is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Cobicistat is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Moderate) Monitor the INR and adjust the dose as necessary if warfarin is coadministered with darunavir. Concurrent use may increase the INR and the risk of bleeding. Darunavir is a CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a 3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Darunavir; Cobicistat; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir alafenamide: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with cobicistat is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Cobicistat is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Moderate) Monitor the INR and adjust the dose as necessary if warfarin is coadministered with darunavir. Concurrent use may increase the INR and the risk of bleeding. Darunavir is a CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a 3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Dasabuvir; Ombitasvir; Paritaprevir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) Fluctuations in International Normalized Ratio (INR) have been observed in warfarin recipients who were also receiving treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, including dasabuvir. It is recommended to closely monitor these patients for changes in INR both during and after discontinuation of the HCV treatment regimen. (Moderate) Monitor the INR and adjust the dose as necessary if warfarin is coadministered with ritonavir: concurrent use may increase the risk of bleeding or reduce efficacy. Ritonavir is a CYP 3A4 inhibitor as well as a CYP1A4, CYP2C9, and CYP3A4 inducer. Warfarin is a substrate of CYP3A4, CYP2C9, and CYP1A2.
    Dasatinib: (Moderate) Monitor for evidence of bleeding if coadministration of dasatinib and anticoagulants is necessary. Dasatinib can cause serious and fatal bleeding. Concomitant anticoagulants may increase the risk of hemorrhage.
    Dasiglucagon: (Moderate) Caution should be exercised for patients taking warfarin when glucagon will be administered. Monitor the INR as clinically indicated and monitor for evidence of bleeding. Glucagon has been reported to enhance the hypoprothrombinemic response in 8 out of 13 patients receiving warfarin. Clinical bleeding also was reported in 3 patients. These findings - based on data from only 13 patients - were published in 1970 and no subsequent reports have been identified. The mechanism of this interaction is uncertain.
    Deferasirox: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with deferasirox is necessary as concurrent use may increase or decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk or reduced efficacy. Deferasirox is a CYP1A2 inhibitor and warfarin is a CYP1A2 substrate. Additionally, deferasirox is a weak CYP3A4 inducer and warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. Finally, because gastric ulceration and GI bleeding have been reported in patients taking deferasirox, use caution when giving with other drugs known to increase the risk of peptic ulcers or gastric hemorrhage including anticoagulants.
    Defibrotide: (Contraindicated) Coadministration of defibrotide with antithrombotic agents like anticoagulants is contraindicated. The pharmacodynamic activity and risk of hemorrhage with antithrombotic agents are increased if coadministered with defibrotide. If therapy with defibrotide is necessary, discontinue systemic antithrombotic agents (not including use for routine maintenance or reopening of central venous catheters) prior to initiation of defibrotide therapy. Consider delaying the onset of defibrotide treatment until the effects of the antithrombotic agent have abated.
    Delavirdine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with delavirdine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Delavirdine is a strong CYP3A4 and moderate CYP2C9 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4/CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Desirudin: (Major) Any agent which may enhance the risk of hemorrhage should generally be discontinued before initiating desirudin therapy, including anticoagulants. If coadministration cannot be avoided, close clinical and laboratory monitoring should be conducted. The concomitant administration of warfarin did not significantly affect the pharmacokinetic effects of desirudin; however, greater inhibition of hemostasis measured by aPTT, PT, and INR was observed with coadministration. If a patient is switched from oral anticoagulants to desirudin therapy or from desirudin to oral anticoagulants, the anticoagulant activity should continue to be closely monitored with appropriate methods. That activity should be taken into account in the evaluation of the overall coagulation status of the patient during the switch.
    Desvenlafaxine: (Moderate) Advise patients of the increased bleeding risk associated with the concomitant use of desvenlafaxine and warfarin. Carefully monitor patients receiving warfarin therapy if desvenlafaxine is initiated or discontinued. Case reports and epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between use of drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake and gastrointestinal bleeding.
    Dextran: (Moderate) Because of the potential effects of certain dextran formulations on bleeding time, use with caution in patients on anticoagulants concurrently.
    Dextromethorphan; Quinidine: (Moderate) Quinidine may potentiate the anticoagulation effects of warfarin; bleeding has been reported. This interaction is probably due to additive hypoprothrombinemia associated with concomitant administration of warfarin and quinine or quinidine. Close monitoring of the INR is required when either of these agents is added to warfarin therapy.
    Diazoxide: (Minor) Diazoxide can displace highly protein-bound drugs from their protein-binding sites, resulting in an increased therapeutic effect. This interaction should be considered when administering diazoxide concomitantly with other highly protein-bound drugs such as warfarin.
    Diclofenac: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Diclofenac; Misoprostol: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Dicloxacillin: (Moderate) Increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of dicloxacillin, is suggested with the concomitant use of warfarin. Dicloxacillin may reduce the anticoagulant response to warfarin. A decrease in INR has been demonstrated.
    Diflunisal: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Diltiazem: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with diltiazem is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Diltiazem is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Diphenhydramine; Ibuprofen: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Diphenhydramine; Naproxen: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Dipyridamole: (Moderate) Because dipyridamole is a platelet inhibitor, there is a potential additive risk for bleeding if dipyridamole is given in combination with other agents that affect hemostasis. Per the manufacturer, dipyridamole does not influence prothrombin time or activity when administered with warfarin; bleeding frequency and severity are similar when dipyridamole is administered with or without warfarin. In rare cases, however, increased bleeding has been observed during or after surgery. Regardless, caution is advised as both anticoagulants including warfarin and platelet inhibitors such as dipyridamole affect hemostasis and combination therapy could increase the risk of bleeding.
    Disopyramide: (Minor) A single case of the use of disopyramide with warfarin reported that discontinuation of disopyramide resulted in a drop in the prothrombin time; however, causality was not established and other factors may have contributed to reduction of anticoagulant effect. A direct interaction between disopyramide and warfarin has not been established.
    Disulfiram: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with disulfiram is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Disulfiram is a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. Disulfiram is also a weak CYP1A2 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP1A2 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Doripenem: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including carbapenems, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Dronabinol: (Major) Use caution if coadministration of dronabinol with warfarin is necessary, and monitor for an increase in dronabinol-related adverse reactions (e.g., feeling high, dizziness, confusion, somnolence) as well as increased bleeding or an increased PT/INR. Dronabinol is a CYP2C9 and 3A4 substrate; warfarin is a weak inhibitor of CYP2C9 in vitro. Concomitant use may result in elevated plasma concentrations of dronabinol. Dronabinol is also highly bound to plasma proteins and may displace and increase the free fraction of other concomitantly administered protein-bound drugs such as warfarin.
    Dronedarone: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with dronedarone is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Dronedarone is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Drospirenone; Ethinyl Estradiol; Levomefolate: (Moderate) L-methylfolate and warfarin should be used together cautiously. Significant impairment of folate status may occur after 6 months of therapy with warfarin. Monitor patients for decreased efficacy of L-methylfolate if these agents are used together.
    Drotrecogin Alfa: (Major) Treatment with drotrecogin alfa should be carefully considered in patients who are receiving or have received any anticoagulants. There is an additive risk of beeding.
    Duloxetine: (Moderate) Advise patients of the increased bleeding risk associated with the concomitant use of duloxetine and warfarin. Carefully monitor patients receiving warfarin therapy if duloxetine is initiated or discontinued. Case reports and epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between use of drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake and gastrointestinal bleeding. Although both duloxetine and warfarin are highly protein bound, concurrent use did not significantly change INR or warfarin pharmacokinetics.
    Dupilumab: (Moderate) Coadministration of dupilumab may result in altered exposure to warfarin. During chronic inflammation, increased levels of certain cytokines can alter the formation of CYP450 enzymes. Thus, the formation of CYP450 enzymes could be normalized during dupilumab administration. Clinically relevant drug interactions may occur with CYP450 substrates that have a narrow therapeutic index such as warfarin. Monitor the INR if dupilumab is initiated or discontinued in a patient taking warfarin; warfarin dose adjustments may be needed.
    Dutasteride; Tamsulosin: (Moderate) The manufacturer reports that results from limited in vitro and in vivo drug-drug interaction studies between tamsulosin and warfarin have been inconclusive; and therefore, tamsulosin should be used cautiously with warfarin.
    Duvelisib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with duvelisib is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Duvelisib is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Echinacea: (Moderate) Warfarin is metabolized by both CYP1A2 and CYP3A4. Echinacea appears to induce hepatic CYP3A4 and have variable effects on CYP1A2. The impact of Echinacea on the safety and efficacy of warfarin therapy are unknown, but studies suggest an interaction is possible. In one single-dose warfarin study, the apparent clearance of (S)-warfarin (90% CI of ratio; 1.01 to 1.18) was significantly higher during concomitant treatment with echinacea but this did not lead to a clinically significant change in INR (90% CI of AUC of INR; 0.91 to 1.31) in this single-dose warfarin study. Close monitoring of the INR and clinical status of the patient may be prudent if echinacea is used with warfarin until more data are available.
    Econazole: (Moderate) Coadministation of econazole and warfarin has resulted in enhanced anticoagulant effect. In many of these cases, absorption of econazole may have been increased by applying the drug under occlusion, to the genitals, or over large body surface areas. If these drugs are used in combination, closely monitor the International Normalized Ratio (INR) and/or prothrombin time.
    Edoxaban: (Major) Avoid concurrent use of edoxaban with warfarin due to the increased bleeding risk. Monitor patients closely and promptly evaluate any signs or symptoms of bleeding if edoxaban and other anticoagulants are used concomitantly. Coadministration of edoxaban and other anticoagulants may increase the risk of bleeding. Long-term concomitant treatment with edoxaban and other anticoagulants is not recommended; short-term use may be necessary for patients transitioning to or from edoxaban.
    Efavirenz: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with efavirenz is necessary as concurrent use may increase or decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk or reduced efficacy. Efavirenz is a moderate CYP2C9 inhibitor and warfarin is a CYP2C9 substrate. Additionally, efavirenz is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer and warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate.
    Efavirenz; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with efavirenz is necessary as concurrent use may increase or decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk or reduced efficacy. Efavirenz is a moderate CYP2C9 inhibitor and warfarin is a CYP2C9 substrate. Additionally, efavirenz is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer and warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate.
    Efavirenz; Lamivudine; Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with efavirenz is necessary as concurrent use may increase or decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk or reduced efficacy. Efavirenz is a moderate CYP2C9 inhibitor and warfarin is a CYP2C9 substrate. Additionally, efavirenz is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer and warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate.
    Elagolix: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with elagolix is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Elagolix is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Elagolix; Estradiol; Norethindrone acetate: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with elagolix is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Elagolix is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Elbasvir; Grazoprevir: (Moderate) Closely monitor patients receiving warfarin in combination with elbasvir for changes in International Normalized Ratio (INR) both during and after discontinuation of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment regimen. One study found that when adding an elbasvir containing regimen to patients stable on warfarin anticoagulation, warfarin sensitivity decreased significantly during treatment and returned to baseline after discontinuation of the HCV therapy. More specifically, the mean INR decreased from 2.4 to 1.96 during treatment and recovered to 2.59 after elbasvir treatment. (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with grazoprevir is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Grazoprevir is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Elexacaftor; tezacaftor; ivacaftor: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with ivacaftor is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Ivacaftor is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer is a CYP3A4 substrate. Ivacaftor is also a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9/CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with tezacaftor; ivacaftor is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Ivacaftor is a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. Ivacaftor is also a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Eltrombopag: (Moderate) Use caution when discontinuing eltrombopag in patients receiving anticoagulants (e.g., warfarin, enoxaparin, dabigatran, rivaroxaban). The risk of bleeding and recurrent thrombocytopenia is increased in patients receiving these drugs when eltrombopag is discontinued.
    Elvitegravir: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with elvitegravir is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Elvitegravir is a weak CYP2C9 inducer and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Elvitegravir; Cobicistat; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir Alafenamide: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with cobicistat is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Cobicistat is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with elvitegravir is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Elvitegravir is a weak CYP2C9 inducer and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Elvitegravir; Cobicistat; Emtricitabine; Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with cobicistat is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Cobicistat is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with elvitegravir is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Elvitegravir is a weak CYP2C9 inducer and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Emapalumab: (Moderate) Monitor for decreased efficacy of warfarin and adjust the dose as needed during coadministration with emapalumab. Warfarin is a CYP2C9 substrate with a narrow therapeutic index. Emapalumab may normalize CYP450 activity, which may decrease the efficacy of drugs that are CYP450 substrates due to increased metabolism.
    Encorafenib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with encorafenib is necessary as concurrent use may increase or decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk or reduced efficacy. Encorafenib is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate which can lead to increased warfarin exposure and increased bleeding risk. Encorafenib is also a weak CYP3A4 inducer which can lead to decreased warfarin exposure and reduced efficacy.
    Enflurane: (Minor) All inhalational anesthetics, including enflurane, can increase the effects of warfarin, although the clinical significance of this interaction is not clear.
    Enoxaparin: (Moderate) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving enoxaparin in combination with other anticoagulants. If coadministration of 2 or more anticoagulants is necessary, patients should be closely monitored for evidence of bleeding.
    Entacapone: (Moderate) Monitoring of the INR is recommended when entacapone treatment is initiated or when the dose is increased for patients receiving warfarin. Cases of significantly increased INR in patients concomitantly using warfarin have been reported during the postapproval use of entacapone. Entacapone has affinity for CYP2C9. In an interaction study in healthy volunteers, entacapone did not significantly change the plasma levels of S-warfarin while the AUC for R-warfarin increased on average by 18% (Cl 90 11% to 26%), and the INR values increased on average by 13% (Cl 90 6% to 19%).
    Enteral Feedings: (Major) Phytonadione, vitamin K1, is a pharmacologic antagonist of warfarin. Occult sources of vitamin K may decrease or reverse the activity of warfarin. Occult sources of vitamin K may include selected enteral feedings. In general, it is recommended that patients avoid large servings or frequent intake of foods that contain substantial amounts of vitamin K. Patients should aim for a stable and non-excessive intake of vitamin K in the diet to ensure stable INRs and appropriate clinical response to warfarin treatment.
    Enzalutamide: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with enzalutamide is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Enzalutamide is a moderate CYP2C9 and strong CYP3A4 inducer and warfarin is a CYP2C9/CYP3A4 substrate.
    Epoprostenol: (Moderate) When used concurrently with anticoagulants, epoprostenol may increase the risk of bleeding.
    Eptifibatide: (Moderate) Concomitant use of eptifibatide and other agents that may affect hemostasis, such as anticoagulants, may be associated with an increased risk of bleeding.
    Erdafitinib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR and adjust the dose as necessary if warfarin is coadministered with erdafitinib; concurrent use may increase the risk of bleeding or reduce efficacy. Erdafitinib is a time dependent inhibitor and inducer of CYP3A4 and the R-enantiomer is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Erlotinib: (Major) Regularly monitor prothrombin time (PT) or INR in patients taking warfarin. Increased INR and bleeding adverse reactions, in some cases fatal, have been reported in patients receiving concomitant therapy. Dose modifications of erlotinib are not recommended.
    Ertapenem: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including carbapenems, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Erythromycin: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with erythromycin is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Erythromycin is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Erythromycin; Sulfisoxazole: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with erythromycin is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Erythromycin is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Escitalopram: (Moderate) Advise patients of the increased bleeding risk associated with the concomitant use of escitalopram and warfarin. Carefully monitor patients receiving warfarin therapy if escitalopram is initiated or discontinued. Although the pharmacokinetics of warfarin were unaffected by citalopram, prothrombin time was increased by 5%; the clinical significance is unknown. Case reports and epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between use of drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake and gastrointestinal bleeding.
    Eslicarbazepine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with eslicarbazepine is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Eslicarbazepine is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Esterified Estrogens; Methyltestosterone: (Moderate) Methyltestosterone can increase the effects of anticoagulants through reduction of procoagulant factor. Patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy should be closely monitored, especially when methyltestosterone treatment is initiated or discontinued.
    Estradiol; Levonorgestrel: (Major) Oral levonorgestrel-containing emergency contraceptive regimens may interact with warfarin and concurrent use may require patient education and monitoring. A case report of an interaction of warfarin with a levonorgestrel-only oral emergency contraceptive regimen has been described. The patient involved had familial antithrombin deficiency and was stabilized on warfarin as her only medication. The INR increased to 8.1 (without bleeding complications) from 2.1 within 3 days after receiving levonorgestrel. With corrective action, the warfarin was resumed at the usual dose without complication 2 days later. The report speculated that levonorgestrel displaced warfarin from plasma protein binding sites; however, inhibition of hepatic CYP2C9 by levonorgestrel may have decreased the metabolism of warfarin. This is the only report of this type of interaction available.
    Estrogens: (Major) Estrogen-based hormone replacement therapies and contraceptive methods are generally contraindicated in patients with thromboembolic risk. However, per ACOG guidelines, in select patients the benefits of such contraception may outweigh the risks, as long as appropriate anticoagulant therapy is utilized. Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) may inhibit CYP3A4 and CYP1A2, which can rarely influence warfarin pharmacokinetics and the INR value. Isolated case reports have noted altered responses to warfarin in patients receiving combined hormonal contraceptives. Estrogens increase the hepatic synthesis of prothrombin and factors VII, VIII, IX, and X and decrease antithrombin III; estrogens also increase norepinephrine-induced platelet aggregability. A positive relationship of estrogen-containing OCs to thromboembolic disease has been demonstrated. OC products containing 50-mcg or more of ethinyl estradiol are associated with the greatest risk of thromboembolic complications. The addition of certain progestins may influence thromboembolic risks. A positive relationship between estrogen-based HRT and the risk of thromboembolic disease has also been demonstrated in the Women's Health Initiative Trials. Estrogen-based HRT products are generally contraindicated in patients with a current or past history of stroke, cerebrovascular disease, coronary artery disease, coronary thrombosis, thrombophlebitis, thromboembolic disease (including pulmonary embolism and DVT), or valvular heart disease with complications. If concurrent use of an estrogen-based product cannot be avoided, carefully monitor for signs and symptoms of thromboembolic complications. If thromboembolic events occur, discontinue the HRT regimen. Estrogen-based HRT is generally not expected to significantly alter the INR or to affect the metabolism of warfarin. Dosage adjustment of warfarin in a woman taking HRT should be based on the prothrombin time or INR value.
    Ethacrynic Acid: (Major) Although data are very limited, there have been reports of increased hypoprothrombinemia when ethacrynic acid was administered to patients receiving warfarin. Ethacrynic acid has been shown to displace warfarin from plasma protein; a reduction in the usual anticoagulant dosage may be required in patients receiving both drugs. Patients should be monitored for changes in the INR when either of these drugs is initiated or discontinued, or if the dosage is changed.
    Ethanol: (Moderate) In controlled studies of patients or healthy subjects anticoagulated with warfarin, small to moderate amounts of wine (e.g., 2 drinks per day or less) do not alter INR values or warfarin levels. However, acute intoxication resulting from large amounts of ethanol may enhance the hypoprothrombinemic response to oral anticoagulants due to inhibition of warfarin's metabolism. Although chronic consumption of ethanol may increase warfarin clearance, studies have not demonstrated a reduction in anticoagulant effect. However, chronic consumption of alcohol may lead to hepatic disease, resulting in potentiation of hypoprothrombinemia due to impaired hepatic synthesis of clotting factors. (Moderate) In controlled studies of patients or healthy subjects anticoagulated with warfarin, small to moderate amounts of wine do not alter INR values or warfarin levels. However, acute intoxication resulting from large amounts of ethanol may enhance the hypoprothrombinemic response to oral anticoagulants due to inhibition of warfarin's metabolism.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Levonorgestrel; Folic Acid; Levomefolate: (Major) Oral levonorgestrel-containing emergency contraceptive regimens may interact with warfarin and concurrent use may require patient education and monitoring. A case report of an interaction of warfarin with a levonorgestrel-only oral emergency contraceptive regimen has been described. The patient involved had familial antithrombin deficiency and was stabilized on warfarin as her only medication. The INR increased to 8.1 (without bleeding complications) from 2.1 within 3 days after receiving levonorgestrel. With corrective action, the warfarin was resumed at the usual dose without complication 2 days later. The report speculated that levonorgestrel displaced warfarin from plasma protein binding sites; however, inhibition of hepatic CYP2C9 by levonorgestrel may have decreased the metabolism of warfarin. This is the only report of this type of interaction available. (Moderate) L-methylfolate and warfarin should be used together cautiously. Significant impairment of folate status may occur after 6 months of therapy with warfarin. Monitor patients for decreased efficacy of L-methylfolate if these agents are used together.
    Etidronate: (Moderate) There have been isolated reports of etidronate causing an increased prothrombin time/INR when the drug is given to patients stabilized on warfarin. Although none of the reports have described clinically significant sequelae, it is advisable to monitor the INR periodically in patients taking warfarin who have etidronate therapy added.
    Etodolac: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Etoposide, VP-16: (Moderate) Frequently measure the PT/INR if coadministration of etoposide with warfarin is necessary; concomitant use can increase the INR.
    Etravirine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with etravirine is necessary as concurrent use may increase or decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk or reduced efficacy. Etravirine is a CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. Additionally, etravirine is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer and warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate.
    Everolimus: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with everolimus is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Everolimus is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Exenatide: (Moderate) Cases of an increased INR have been reported with the concomitant use of warfarin and exenatide, sometimes associated with bleeding. Monitor for changes in INR and bleeding when these drugs are coadministered. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary.
    Ezetimibe: (Moderate) Coadministration with ezetimibe has not demonstrated significant effects on the bioavailability or the anticoagulant effects of warfarin when studied in 12 healthy adult males. However, according to the manufacturer, increases in PT/INR have been reported and accordingly recommends that if ezetimibe is added to warfarin, the INR should be monitored.
    Ezetimibe; Simvastatin: (Moderate) Coadministration with ezetimibe has not demonstrated significant effects on the bioavailability or the anticoagulant effects of warfarin when studied in 12 healthy adult males. However, according to the manufacturer, increases in PT/INR have been reported and accordingly recommends that if ezetimibe is added to warfarin, the INR should be monitored. (Moderate) Per prescribing information for warfarin sodium (Coumadin), all HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) have been associated with potentiation of warfarin's clinical effect. However, it appears that pravastatin and atorvastatin may be less likely to significantly interact with warfarin based on drug interaction studies. In addition, atorvastatin has been reported to slightly and transiently decrease the anticoagulant activity of warfarin; these effects were not considered clinically significant. In general, it is prudent to monitor INR at baseline, at initiation of these HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors, and after subsequent dosage changes. Adjust warfarin dosage based on INR and clinical response. Once a stable INR is documented, the INR can be monitored at the intervals otherwise recommended based on the indication for anticoagulation and co-existing conditions.
    Famotidine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with famotidine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Famotidine is a CYP1A2 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP1A2 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Famotidine; Ibuprofen: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with famotidine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Famotidine is a CYP1A2 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP1A2 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Fedratinib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with fedratinib is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Fedratinib is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Fenofibrate: (Moderate) Fenofibrate potentiates the effects of warfarin and other oral anticoagulants, resulting in increased prothrombin times. Fibrates have been shown to decrease vitamin K dependent coagulation factor synthesis. Since these drugs are also highly protein-bound, it is possible that fenofibrate displaces warfarin from protein-binding sites as a potential mechanism. Case reports of significant effects on warfarin exist for all fibrate drugs. Three clinical case reports of fenofibrate and warfarin interactions have been reported in post-marketing surveillance of fenofibrate in the US and Europe. In one case, a 47 year old male who had been stable over a course of 20 weeks on his prescribed warfarin dose was admitted to the hospital one week after beginning treatment for hypertriglyceridemia with fenofibrate 201 mg/day. He presented with epigastric discomfort and hematuria. His INR on admission was > 8.5 (previously stabilized at 2 to 2.5 prior to fenofibrate). The patient received treatment with phytonadione and discontinuation of the medications. He was discharged 2 days later, but agreed to be rechallenged under a controlled protocol to confirm the interaction of the fenofibrate with his warfarin. After stabilization of his warfarin dose for 3 weeks, fenofibrate was restarted, and the patient was rechallenged on 2 occasions. Both times, an increase in INR above the therapeutic range occurred. Patients receiving warfarin in conjunction with fenofibrate should have frequent prothrombin time and INR determinations until it has been determined that the INR has been stabilized. A reduction in warfarin dose may be necessary.
    Fenofibric Acid: (Moderate) Fenofibric acid potentiates the effects of warfarin and other oral anticoagulants, resulting in increased prothrombin times. Fibrates have been shown to decrease vitamin K dependent coagulation factor synthesis. Since these drugs are also highly protein-bound, it is possible that fenofibric acid displaces warfarin from protein-binding sites as a potential mechanism. Case reports of significant effects on warfarin exist for all fibrate drugs. Fenofibric acid is the active metabolite of fenofibrate. Three clinical case reports of fenofibrate and warfarin interactions have been reported in post-marketing surveillance of fenofibrate in the US and Europe. In one case, a male (47 years) who had been stable over a course of 20 weeks on his prescribed warfarin dose was admitted to the hospital one week after beginning treatment for hypertriglyceridemia with fenofibrate 201 mg/day. He presented with epigastric discomfort and hematuria. His INR on admission was > 8.5 (previously stabilized at 2 to 2.5 prior to fenofibrate). The patient received treatment with phytonadione and discontinuation of the medications. He was discharged 2 days later, but agreed to be rechallenged under a controlled protocol to confirm the interaction of the fenofibrate with his warfarin. After stabilization of his warfarin dose for 3 weeks, fenofibrate was restarted, and the patient was rechallenged on 2 occasions. Both times, an increase in INR above the therapeutic range occurred. In order to prevent bleeding complications, patients receiving warfarin concomitantly with fenofibric acid should have frequent INR determinations until it has been determined that the INR has been stabilized. A reduction in warfarin dose may be necessary.
    Fenoprofen: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Fish Oil, Omega-3 Fatty Acids (Dietary Supplements): (Moderate) Drug interactions with fish oil, omega-3 fatty acids (Dietary Supplements) or fish oil, omega-3 fatty acids (FDA-approved) are unclear at this time. However, because fish oil, omega-3 fatty acids inhibit platelet aggregation, caution is advised when fish oils are used concurrently with anticoagulants, platelet inhibitors, or thrombolytic agents. Theoretically, the risk of bleeding may be increased, but some studies that combined these agents did not produce clinically significant bleeding events. In one placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blinded, parallel study, patients receiving stable, chronic warfarin therapy were administered various doses of fish oil supplements to determine the effect on INR determinations. Patients were randomized to receive a 4-week treatment period of either placebo or 3 or 6 grams of fish oil daily. Patients were followed on a twice-weekly basis for INR determinations and adverse reactions. There was no statistically significant difference in INRs between the placebo or treatment period within each group. There was also no difference in INRs found between groups. One episode of ecchymosis was reported, but no major bleeding episodes occurred. The authors concluded that fish oil supplementation in doses of 3-6 grams per day does not have a statistically significant effect on the INR of patients receiving chronic warfarin therapy. However, an increase in INR from 2.8 to 4.3 in a patient stable on warfarin therapy has been reported when increasing the dose of fish oil, omega-3 fatty acids from 1 gram/day to 2 grams/day. The INR decreased once the patient decreased her dose of fish oil to 1 gram/day. This implies that a dose-related effect of fish oil on warfarin may be possible. Patients receiving warfarin that initiate concomitant fish oil therapy should have their INR monitored more closely and the dose of warfarin adjusted accordingly.
    Flavocoxid, Flavocoxid; Citrated Zinc Bisglycinate: (Moderate) In vitro, flavocoxid, flavocoxid; citrated zinc bisglycinate demonstrated a 23% inhibition of CYP1A2 isoenzymes. This inhibition could potentially be clinically relevant, especially when flavocoxid, flavocoxid; citrated zinc bisglycinate is coadministered with CYP1A2 substrates that have a narrow therapeutic index such as warfarin. Until more data are available, it may be prudent to monitor for potential adverse effects of warfarin when coadministered with flavocoxid, flavocoxid; citrated zinc bisglycinate.
    Flaxseed: (Moderate) Flaxseed fiber can impair the absorption of oral drugs when administered concomitantly. However, no drug interaction studies have been performed to assess the degree to which the absorption of oral drugs may be altered. Based on interactions of other plant seed fiber (e.g., psyllium) used as a bulk-forming laxative, flaxseed fiber may adsorb oral anticoagulants (e.g., warfarin). Administration of prescribed oral agents should be separated from the administration of flaxseed fiber by at least 2 hours.
    Floxuridine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with floxuridine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Floxuridine is a CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Fluconazole: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with fluconazole is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Fluconazole is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. Fluconazole is also a moderate CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Fluorouracil, 5-FU: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with fluorouracil is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Fluorouracil is a CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Fluoxetine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with fluoxetine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Fluoxetine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. Fluoxetine is also a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. An increased risk of bleeding, including gastrointestinal bleeding, has been reported with drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake; thus, concurrent use of fluoxetine and warfarin may result in an additive risk of bleeding events. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Fluoxymesterone: (Moderate) Androgens are associated with potentiation of the hypoprothrombinemic effect of warfarin. These interactions have resulted in bleeding episodes in some patients receiving coumarin derivatives along with danazol, esthylestrenol, methyltestosterone, oxandrolone, oxymetholone, or stanozolol. A multidose study of oxandrolone in 15 healthy individuals concurrently treated with warfarin resulted in significant increases in warfarin half-life and AUC; a 5.5-fold decrease in the mean warfarin dosage from 6.13 mg/day to 1.13 mg/day (approximately 80-85% dose reduction) was necessary to maintain a target INR of 1.5. When oxandrolone is prescribed to patients being treated with warfarin, doses of warfarin may need to be decreased significantly to maintain a desirable INR level and diminish the risk of potentially serious bleeding. A case report describes an increased INR in a woman receiving topical testosterone propionate ointment and anticoagulation with warfarin. In addition, danazol and stanozolol (androgen-related compounds), are associated with potentiation of the hypoprothrombinemic effect of warfarin. Danazol may inhibit warfarin metabolism and/or may potentiate the anticoagulant effects by affecting the coagulation system, and has been associated with reports of serious bleeding events. When androgen therapy is initiated in a patient already receiving warfarin, the patient should be closely monitored with frequent evaluation of the INR and clinical parameters; the dosage of warfarin should be adjusted as necessary until a stable target INR is achieved. Careful monitoring of the INR and necessary adjustment of the warfarin dosage are also recommended when the androgen or androgen-related (danazol, stanozolol) therapy is changed or discontinued.
    Fluphenazine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with fluphenazine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Fluphenazine is a CYP1A2 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP1A2 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Flurbiprofen: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Flutamide: (Moderate) Prothrombin times and/or INRs have increased in patients receiving long-term warfarin therapy who are given flutamide. Adjustment of the warfarin dose may be required during flutamide therapy.
    Fluvastatin: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with fluvastatin is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Fluvastatin is a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Fluvoxamine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with fluvoxamine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Fluvoxamine is a moderate CYP3A4 and weak CYP1A2 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4/CYP1A2 substrate. Fluvoxamine is also a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. An increased risk of bleeding, including gastrointestinal bleeding, has been reported with drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake; thus, concurrent use of fluoxetine and warfarin may result in an additive risk of bleeding events. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Fondaparinux: (Major) Discontinue warfarin before starting fondaparinux due to the increased bleeding risk, unless these agents are essential, such as in the early treatment of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. If coadministration is necessary, monitor patients closely and promptly evaluate any signs or symptoms of bleeding.
    Food: (Major) Interactions with warfarin and cranberry juice (cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) have been reported, but the data are controversial. Some case reports have reported increased INR or other clinically significant events, while limited and small controlled clinical research data do not support an interaction. It is not clear if warfarin would interact with cranberry supplements (e.g., dried extracts); caution is advised until further data are available; patients should likely have consistent cranberry intake, including intake of cranberry capsules and concentrates, if on warfarin therapy. (Major) Patients should use caution in combining marijuana use with warfarin. Marijuana may increase warfarin anticoagulant effect by inhibiting its metabolism, and to a lesser extent, displacing warfarin from protein-binding sites. This may lead to an increased risk for bleeding events. CYP2C9 is the principle enzyme that metabolizes S-warfarin and modulates the in vivo activity of warfarin. Certain cannabinoids in marijuana may inhibit CYP2C metabolism. A case report has described a potential interaction in a patient previously stabilized on long-term warfarin therapy who experienced 2 hospitalizations due to bleeding and increased international normalized ratio (INR) after smoking marijuana; the INR normalized and remained stable once the patient quit using marijuana. Other causes for the potential change in INR were ruled out. In patients who report marijuana use while on warfarin therapy, the international normalized ratio (INR) should be carefully monitored. (Major) Phytonadione, vitamin K1, is a pharmacologic antagonist of warfarin; it is often administered to reverse elevated INR from warfarin overdose. Exogenous administration or occult sources of vitamin K may decrease or reverse the activity of warfarin. Response to warfarin usually returns after stopping the vitamin K-containing product. Occult sources of vitamin K include enteral feedings, certain multivitamins, and many food products. Foods that contain large amounts of vitamin K include green tea, brussel sprouts, and kale. Other foods that contain moderate-high quantities of vitamin K include asparagus, avocado, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, collard greens, lettuce, liver, soy products (including soy milk, soybeans or soybean oil), lentils, peas, mustard greens, turnip greens, parsley, green scallions, and spinach. Medical products that contain soybean oil such as intravenous lipid emulsions or propofol, may decrease warfarin anticoagulation. Intravenous lipids may interfere with warfarin anticoagulation in many ways including enhancing the production of clotting factors, facilitating platelet aggregation, supplying vitamin K, and enhancing warfarin binding to albumin. In general, it is recommended that patients avoid large servings or frequent intake of foods that contain substantial amounts of vitamin K. (Moderate) The regular use of chamomile teas or other chamomile products should be approaced with caution in patients taking warfarin. A case report noted an enhanced effect of warfarin, resulting in an elevated international normalized ratio (INR) and associated bleeding, when a patient increased her ingestion of chamomile tea (chamomile, Matricaria recutita); this is the only known formal report of an interaction. Various chamomile species are known to contain coumarin related compounds that may have an additive effect with warfarin. No pharmacokinetic alterations in warfarin were evident from this case report. The authors recommend that patients limit and not greatly alter their Chamomile use while taking warfarin therapy. Educate patients on the potential risks of the ingestion of nutritional supplements and herbal remedies, and the importance of dietary intake. Monitor the patient clinically for adverse events and regularly monitor the patient's INR.
    Fosamprenavir: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR and adjust dose of warfarin as needed if coadministered with fosamprenavir; concurrent use may increase or decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk or reduced efficacy. Fosamprenavir is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor and a CYP3A4 inducer; the R-enantiomer of warfarin is metabolized by CYP3A4.
    Fostamatinib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with fostamatinib is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Fostamatinib is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Garlic, Allium sativum: (Moderate) Garlic produces clinically significant antiplatelet effects so additive risk of bleeding may occur if anticoagulants are given in combination. Avoid concurrent use of herbs which interact with anticoagulants when possible. If garlic dietary supplements are taken, monitor the INR or other appropriate parameters to attain clinical and anticoagulant endpoints. In regard to warfarin, published data are limited to a random case report; however, the product labeling for warfarin includes garlic as having potential for interaction due to additive pharmacologic activity. A case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma, attributed to dysfunctional platelets from excessive garlic use in a patient not receiving concomitant anticoagulation, has been reported.
    Gefitinib: (Moderate) Regularly monitor INR regularly and watch carefully for signs and symptoms of bleeding if gefitinib and warfarin are used concomitantly. Elevated INR and/or hemorrhage have been reported in some patients taking warfarin while on gefitinib therapy.
    Gemfibrozil: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with gemfibrozil is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Gemfibrozil is a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Gemifloxacin: (Moderate) There have been postmarketing reports of increases in the INR, prothrombin time (PT), and/or clinical episodes of bleeding in patients receiving quinolones, including gemifloxacin, with warfarin or its derivatives. In addition, infectious disease and its accompanying inflammatory process,, and the age and health status of the patient are risk factors for increased anticoagulation activity. Therefore, the PT, INR or other suitable coagulation test should be closely monitored. Monitor for bleeding.
    Gentamicin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Ginger, Zingiber officinale: (Moderate) Additive bleeding may occur if anticoagulants are given in combination with ginger, zingiber officinale. Ginger inhibits thromboxane synthetase (platelet aggregation inducer) and is a prostacyclin agonist. Patients taking ginger and an anticoagulant should be monitored closely for bleeding.
    Ginkgo, Ginkgo biloba: (Major) Ginkgo, Ginkgo biloba is reported to inhibit platelet aggregation and several case reports describe bleeding complications with Ginkgo biloba, with or without concomitant drug therapy. Since ginkgo produces clinically-significant antiplatelet effects, it should be used cautiously in patients drugs that inhibit platelet aggregation or pose a risk for bleeding, such as anticoagulants. Ginkgo, Ginkgo biloba is reported to inhibit platelet aggregation and several case reports describe bleeding complications with Ginkgo biloba, with or without concomitant drug therapy. Since ginkgo produces clinically-significant antiplatelet effects, it should be used cautiously in patients drugs that inhibit platelet aggregation or pose a risk for bleeding, such as anticoagulants (e.g., warfarin), aspirin, ASA or other platelet inhibitors, or thrombolytic agents. A patient who had been taking aspirin 325 mg/day PO for 3 years following coronary-artery bypass surgery, developed spontaneous bleeding into his eye after taking a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba (Ginkoba commercial product) 40 mg PO twice daily for one week. The patient stopped taking the ginkgo but continued taking the aspirin with no recurrence of bleeding over a 3-month period. Other clinical data exist that describe spontaneous subdural hematomas associated with chronic ginkgo biloba ingestion.
    Ginseng, Panax ginseng: (Major) Interactions have been reported clinically between ginseng and warfarin. With regard to warfarin, one case report is noted of a decreased INR (reduced anticoagulant effect) after the addition of ginseng (Ginsana) in a patient stabilized on warfarin, followed by a return to the desired INR after ginseng was discontinued. In another report, ginseng was implicated in a life-threatening case of valve thrombosis in a patient with an inability to maintain a therapeutic INR on warfarin after he began using a commercial ginseng product. The effect of ginseng on warfarin has been evaluated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 4 weeks duration in healthy volunteers. The subjects (n= 20) received warfarin (5 mg/day PO x 3 days/week). Beginning in week two, 12 of the subjects took ginseng powder (2 g/day PO in capsules); 8 subjects took placebo capsules. Compared with the placebo group, the ginseng group had significantly reduced INR values, warfarin AUCs, and peak plasma warfarin concentrations after 2 weeks. Concurrent use of ginseng and warfarin is not recommended; clinicians should discuss ginseng use with patients. Ginseng (Panax ginseng) also exerts antiplatelet activity and theoretically may interact with other drugs that exhibit antiplatelet effects or anticoagulant activity; however, data are not available to confirm or deny clinical interactions.
    Givosiran: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with givosiran is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Givosiran may moderately reduce hepatic CYP1A2 inhibitor enzyme activity because of its pharmacological effects on the hepatic heme biosynthesis pathway and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP1A2 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Glecaprevir; Pibrentasvir: (Moderate) Fluctuations in International Normalized Ratio (INR) have been observed in warfarin recipients who were also receiving treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, including glecaprevir. It is recommended to closely monitor these patients for changes in INR both during and after discontinuation of the HCV treatment regimen. (Moderate) Fluctuations in International Normalized Ratio (INR) have been observed in warfarin recipients who were also receiving treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, including pibrentasvir. It is recommended to closely monitor these patients for changes in INR both during and after discontinuation of the HCV treatment regimen.
    Glucagon: (Moderate) Caution should be exercised for patients taking warfarin when glucagon will be administered. Monitor the INR as clinically indicated and monitor for evidence of bleeding. Glucagon has been reported to enhance the hypoprothrombinemic response in 8 out of 13 patients receiving warfarin. Clinical bleeding also was reported in 3 patients. These findings - based on data from only 13 patients - were published in 1970 and no subsequent reports have been identified. The mechanism of this interaction is uncertain.
    Glucosamine: (Moderate) Case reports have reported a possible interaction between chondroitin; glucosamine and warfarin or other coumarin anticoagulants, resulting in an increase in INR and a need for warfarin dosage adjustment. In one case report, the patient was taking twice the recommended dosage of a popular chondroitin; glucosamine supplement (Cosamin DS). Controlled clinical trials of chondroitin; glucosamine for the treatment of osteoarthritis have not reported drug interactions with oral anticoagulants at typical dosages of up to 1500 mg glucosamine; 1200 mg chondroitin/day PO. However, drug interactions with these supplements have not been specifically studied. Until more is known regarding the potential for chondroitin or glucosamine to interact with warfarin, it may be prudent to closely monitor patients stabilized on warfarin if these dietary supplements are added to their therapy regimen.
    Glycerol Phenylbutyrate: (Moderate) Concomitant use of glycerol phenylbutyrate and warfarin may result in decreased exposure of warfarin. Warfarin is a CYP3A substrate; glycerol phenylbutyrate is a weak inducer of CYP3A4. Monitor for decreased efficacy of warfarin during coadministration.
    Glycylcyclines: (Moderate) In healthy subjects receiving tigecycline (repeated dosing) and warfarin (25 mg single dose) concomitantly, the clearance of R-warfarin and S-warfarin was decreased by 40% and 23%, the Cmax increased by 38% and 43%, and the AUC increased by 68% and 29%, respectively. Tigecycline did not significantly alter the effects of warfarin on the INR in this single-dose study. Warfarin did not affect the pharmacokinetic profile of tigecycline. However, it is recommended that the prothrombin time or other suitable anticoagulation test (i.e., INR) be monitored if tigecycline is administered with warfarin.
    Golimumab: (Moderate) If golimumab is initiated or discontinued in a patient taking warfarin, monitor the INR; warfarin dose adjustment may be needed. The formation of CYP450 enzymes may be suppressed by increased concentrations of cytokines (e.g., TNF-alpha) during chronic inflammation. Thus, it is expected that the formation of CYP450 enzymes could be normalized during golimumab receipt. Clinically relevant drug interactions may occur with CYP450 substrates that have a narrow therapeutic index such as warfarin, and alter the clinical response to warfarin treatment.
    Grapefruit juice: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with grapefruit/grapefruit juice is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Grapefruit/grapefruit juice is a strong CYP3A4 and moderate CYP2C9 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4/CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Green Tea: (Moderate) Green tea has demonstrated antiplatelet and fibrinolytic actions in animals. It is possible that the use of green tea may increase the risk of bleeding if co-administered with anticoagulants (e.g., enoxaparin, heparin, warfarin, and others) thrombolytic agents, or platelet inhibitors (e.g., aspirin, clopidogrel, cilostazol and others). Caution and careful monitoring of clinical and/or laboratory parameters are warranted if green tea is coadministered with any of these agents. Exogenous administration or occult sources of vitamin K may decrease or reverse the activity of warfarin; stability of the diet can be an important factor in maintaining anticoagulation goals. Occult sources of vitamin K include green tea and green tea dietary supplements. Published data are limited in regard to this interaction. A patient with previous INRs of 3.2. and 3.79 on a dose of 7.5mg daily of warfarin (goal INR 2.5 to 3.5) had an INR of 1.37. One month later, the patient's INR was 1.14. The patient admitted that he had started consuming 0.51 gallon of green tea daily approximately one week prior to the INR of 1.37. The patient denied noncompliance and other changes in diet, medications, or health. The patient discontinued green tea and one week later his INR was 2.55. While the amount of vitamin K in a single cup of brewed green tea may not be high (0.03 mcg/100 g), the actual amount may vary from cup to cup depending on the amount of tea leaves used, the length of time the tea bags are allowed to brew, and the volume of tea consumed. Additionally, if a patient drinks multiple cups of tea per day, the amount of vitamin K could reach significance. It is recommended that patients on warfarin maintain a stable intake of green tea.
    Griseofulvin: (Major) The anticoagulant effect of warfarin can be decreased if griseofulvin is used concurrently. The griseofulvin-warfarin drug interaction is one of the most well-documented warfarin drug interactions. The mechanism of this interaction is unclear. It is commonly believed that griseofulvin enhances the hepatic metabolism of warfarin. The interaction between warfarin and griseofulvin may require up to 12 weeks to fully manifest and may be more significant with the ultramicrocrystalline formulation of griseofulvin. The international normalized ratio (INR) should be monitored closely if griseofulvin is either added to or discontinued from warfarin therapy.
    Haloperidol: (Moderate) Haloperidol can decrease the anticoagulation effects of warfarin. If these drugs are coadministered, monitor INR and adjust warfarin doses as needed.
    Halothane: (Minor) Halothane can increase the effects of warfarin, although the clinical significance of this interaction is not clear.
    Hemin: (Major) Because hemin has exhibited transient, mild anticoagulant effects during clinical studies, concurrent use of anticoagulants should be avoided. The extent and duration of the hypocoagulable state induced by hemin has not been established.
    Heparin: (Major) An additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving other anticoagulants in combination with heparin. Heparin and warfarin therapies often overlap with no serious sequelae, although the risk of bleeding is nonetheless increased. It should be noted that heparin also can prolong prothrombin time. When heparin and warfarin are administered concomitantly, wait at least 5 hours after the last IV heparin dose or 24 hours after the last subcutaneous heparin dose before drawing blood to obtain prothrombin time.
    Hydantoins: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with hydantoins is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Hydantoins are CYP1A2, moderate CYP2C9, and strong CYP3A4 inducers and the enantiomers of warfarin are substrates of CYP1A2/CYP2C9/CYP3A4. Additionally, an immediate interaction may occur as phenytoin can displace warfarin from protein binding sites causing rapid increases in the INR. Warfarin dosage adjustments may also be necessary on discontinuation of the anticonvulsant.
    Hydrocodone; Ibuprofen: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Ibritumomab Tiuxetan: (Major) During and after therapy, avoid the concomitant use of Yttrium (Y)-90 ibrutumomab tiuxetan with drugs that interfere with coagulation such as anticoagulants; the risk of bleeding may be increased. If coadministration with anticoagulants is necessary, monitor platelet counts more frequently for evidence of thrombocytopenia.
    Ibrutinib: (Moderate) The concomitant use of ibrutinib and aanticoagulant agents such as warfarin may increase the risk of bleeding; monitor patients for signs of bleeding. Severe bleeding events have occurred with ibrutinib therapy including intracranial hemorrhage, GI bleeding, hematuria, and post procedural hemorrhage; some events were fatal. The mechanism for bleeding with ibrutinib therapy is not well understood.
    Ibuprofen: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Ibuprofen; Oxycodone: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Ibuprofen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Icosapent ethyl: (Moderate) Icosapent ethyl is an ethyl ester of the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Because omega-3 fatty acids inhibit platelet aggregation, caution is advised when icosapent ethyl is used concurrently with anticoagulants, platelet inhibitors, or thrombolytic agents. Theoretically, the risk of bleeding may be increased, but some studies that combined these agents did not produce clinically significant bleeding events. In one placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blinded, parallel study, patients receiving stable, chronic warfarin therapy were administered various doses of fish oil supplements to determine the effect on INR determinations. Patients were randomized to receive a 4-week treatment period of either placebo or 3 or 6 grams of fish oil daily. Patients were followed on a twice-weekly basis for INR determinations and adverse reactions. There was no statistically significant difference in INRs between the placebo or treatment period within each group. There was also no difference in INRs found between groups. One episode of ecchymosis was reported, but no major bleeding episodes occurred. The authors concluded that fish oil supplementation in doses of 36 grams per day does not have a statistically significant effect on the INR of patients receiving chronic warfarin therapy. However, an increase in INR from 2.8 to 4.3 in a patient stable on warfarin therapy has been reported when increasing the dose of fish oil, omega-3 fatty acids from 1 gram/day to 2 grams/day. The INR decreased once the patient decreased her dose of fish oil to 1 gram/day. This implies that a dose-related effect of fish oil on warfarin may be possible. Patients receiving warfarin that initiate concomitant icosapent ethyl therapy should have their INR monitored more closely and the dose of warfarin adjusted accordingly.
    Idelalisib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with idelalisib is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Idelalisib is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Iloprost: (Moderate) When used concurrently with anticoagulants, inhaled iloprost may increase the risk of bleeding.
    Imatinib: (Moderate) Due to the thrombocytopenic effects of imatinib an additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving concomitant anticoagulants, NSAIDs, platelet inhibitors, including aspirin, as well as thrombolytic agents. In addition, large doses of salicylates (3 to 4 g/day and greater) can cause hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding. The manufacturer recommends that patients who require anticoagulation while receiving imatinib should receive low-molecular weight heparin or standard heparin instead of warfarin. Coagulation parameters should be monitored closely if warfarin therapy is continued during imatinib therapy. Imatinib is a moderate inhibitor of CYP3A4 and the R-enantiomer is a CYP3A4 substrate, and therefore has potential to increase serum concentrations of warfarin. Since both imatinib and warfarin are highly protein bound (95% and 99%, respectively), displacement from plasma proteins may also occur. In a phase II trial of imatinib, a patient with Philadelphia positive chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase developed cerebral and urinary tract bleeding while receiving imatinib 400 mg daily in combination with warfarin (dose not available). Although a significantly prolonged prothrombin time may have been the result of an increase in the patient's warfarin dose in the days preceding the bleeding, a drug interaction cannot be excluded.
    Imipenem; Cilastatin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including carbapenems, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Imipenem; Cilastatin; Relebactam: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including carbapenems, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Indinavir: (Moderate) Monitor the INR and adjust the dose as necessary if warfarin is coadministered with indinavir. Concurrent use may increase the INR and the risk of bleeding. Indinavir is a CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a 3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Indomethacin: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Infliximab: (Moderate) The formation of CYP450 enzymes may be suppressed by increased concentrations of cytokines (e.g., TNF-alpha) during chronic inflammation. Thus, it is expected that the formation of CYP450 enzymes could be normalized during infliximab receipt. Clinically relevant drug interactions may occur with CYP450 substrates that have a narrow therapeutic index such as warfarin. If infliximab is initiated or discontinued in a patient taking warfarin, check the INR; warfarin dose adjustment may be needed.
    Inotersen: (Moderate) Use caution with concomitant use of inotersen and anticoagulants due to the potential risk of bleeding from thrombocytopenia. Consider discontinuation of anticoagulants in a patient taking inotersen with a platelet count of less than 50,000 per microliter.
    Insulin Glargine; Lixisenatide: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of 25 mg of warfarin with repeated dosing of lixisenatide 20 mcg delayed warfarin Tmax by approximately 7 hours and reduced Cmax by 19%. No clinically relevant effects on AUC or INR were observed. Although increased INR has not been reported in patients receiving warfarin and lixisenatide, cases of an increased INR have been reported with the concomitant use of warfarin and exenatide. Clinicians should closely monitor patients for changes in INR and bleeding when these drugs are coadministered. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary.
    Intravenous Lipid Emulsions: (Moderate) Drug interactions with fish oil, omega-3 fatty acids (Dietary Supplements) or fish oil, omega-3 fatty acids (FDA-approved) are unclear at this time. However, because fish oil, omega-3 fatty acids inhibit platelet aggregation, caution is advised when fish oils are used concurrently with anticoagulants, platelet inhibitors, or thrombolytic agents. Theoretically, the risk of bleeding may be increased, but some studies that combined these agents did not produce clinically significant bleeding events. In one placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blinded, parallel study, patients receiving stable, chronic warfarin therapy were administered various doses of fish oil supplements to determine the effect on INR determinations. Patients were randomized to receive a 4-week treatment period of either placebo or 3 or 6 grams of fish oil daily. Patients were followed on a twice-weekly basis for INR determinations and adverse reactions. There was no statistically significant difference in INRs between the placebo or treatment period within each group. There was also no difference in INRs found between groups. One episode of ecchymosis was reported, but no major bleeding episodes occurred. The authors concluded that fish oil supplementation in doses of 3-6 grams per day does not have a statistically significant effect on the INR of patients receiving chronic warfarin therapy. However, an increase in INR from 2.8 to 4.3 in a patient stable on warfarin therapy has been reported when increasing the dose of fish oil, omega-3 fatty acids from 1 gram/day to 2 grams/day. The INR decreased once the patient decreased her dose of fish oil to 1 gram/day. This implies that a dose-related effect of fish oil on warfarin may be possible. Patients receiving warfarin that initiate concomitant fish oil therapy should have their INR monitored more closely and the dose of warfarin adjusted accordingly. (Moderate) Monitor coagulation parameters closely during coadministration. Anticoagulant activity of warfarin may be counteracted by coadministration of intravenous lipid emulsions due to the natural vitamin K content of soybean and olive oils contained in the product.
    Intravenous Lipid Emulsions: (Moderate) Monitor coagulation parameters closely during coadministration. Anticoagulant activity of warfarin may be counteracted by coadministration of intravenous lipid emulsions due to the natural vitamin K content of soybean and olive oils contained in the product.
    Isavuconazonium: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with isavuconazonium is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Isavuconazonium is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Isoniazid, INH: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with isoniazid is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Isoniazid is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Isoniazid, INH; Pyrazinamide, PZA; Rifampin: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with isoniazid is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Isoniazid is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Isoniazid, INH; Rifampin: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with isoniazid is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Isoniazid is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Isotretinoin: (Moderate) Isotretinoin can decrease the anticoagulation effects of warfarin. If these drugs are coadministered, monitor INR and adjust warfarin doses as needed.
    Istradefylline: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with istradefylline is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Istradefylline is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Itraconazole: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with itraconazole is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Itraconazole is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Ivacaftor: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with ivacaftor is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Ivacaftor is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer is a CYP3A4 substrate. Ivacaftor is also a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9/CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Ivermectin: (Moderate) Concurrent administration of warfarin and oral ivermectin has been associated with postmarketing reports of elevated INR. In 1 case report, a patient who was previously stable on warfarin developed supratherapeutic INR concentrations (greater than 20) and subsequent hematoma after receiving two 3 mg oral ivermectin doses. Although data are limited, ivermectin has been shown to antagonize vitamin K-dependent clotting factors II, VII, IX, and X.
    Ivosidenib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with ivosidenib is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Ivosidenib is a weak CYP2C9/CYP3A4 inducer and the enantiomers of warfarin are substrates of CYP2C9/CYP3A4.
    Kanamycin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Ketoconazole: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with ketoconazole is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Ketoconazole is a strong CYP3A4 and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. Ketoconazole is also a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Ketoprofen: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Ketorolac: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Lanreotide: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with lanreotide is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Limited published data indicate that somatostatin analogs, such as lanreotide, may decrease the metabolic clearance of CYP3A4 substrates, which may be due to the suppression of growth hormone; it cannot be excluded that lanreotide has this effect. The R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Lansoprazole; Amoxicillin; Clarithromycin: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with clarithromycin is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Clarithromycin is a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including penicillins, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Lansoprazole; Naproxen: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Lapatinib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with lapatinib is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Lapatinib is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Larotrectinib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with larotrectinib is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Larotrectinib is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Ledipasvir; Sofosbuvir: (Moderate) Fluctuations in International Normalized Ratio (INR) have been observed in warfarin recipients who were also receiving treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, including ledipasvir. It is recommended to closely monitor these patients for changes in INR both during and after discontinuation of the HCV treatment regimen. (Moderate) Fluctuations in International Normalized Ratio (INR) have been observed in warfarin recipients who were also receiving treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, including sofosbuvir. It is recommended to closely monitor these patients for changes in INR both during and after discontinuation of the HCV treatment regimen.
    Lefamulin: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with lefamulin is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Lefamulin is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Leflunomide: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with leflunomide is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Leflunomide is metabolized to teriflunomide, which is responsible for almost all of leflunomide's activity in vivo. Teriflunomide is a CYP1A2 inducer and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP1A2 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. Teriflunomide may decrease peak INR by approximately 25%. The mechanism is uncertain but, during pharmacokinetic studies, teriflunomide did not affect the pharmacokinetics of S-warfarin (a CYP2C9 substrate).
    Lenalidomide: (Minor) According to the manufacturer, the use of warfarin in patients with blood dyscrasias is contraindicated. Therefore, to minimize the bleeding risk, warfarin should be used cautiously in patients receiving antineoplastic agents that cause myelosuppression or blood dyscrasias. In addition, effects of antineoplastic agents on protein synthesis as well as protein binding may lead to transient changes in a patient's INR while receiving warfarin. The INR may increase and/or decrease throughout the chemotherapy cycle leading to supra- or sub-therapeutic values; monitor warfarin therapy closely. There was no change in pharmacokinetic parameters for either agent when a single dose of warfarin 25 mg PO was administered following multiple oral doses of lenalidomide 10 mg/day. Expected PT and INR changes from warfarin use occurred. However, close monitoring of PT levels and INR in patients with multiple myeloma who require both lenalidomide and warfarin is recommended.
    Lepirudin: (Minor) Based on the pharmacology of warfarin, other anticoagulants could cause additive risk of bleeding when given concurrently with warfarin. In the absence of other anticoagulants, lepirudin influences the INR/PT in a dose dependent, gradual, and linear fashion when aPTT values are within the recommended therapeutic range. If patients are receiving treatment with lepirudin and warfarin or other coumarin derivatives, a small reduction in the INR may occur when lepirudin is discontinued. The PT/INR should be monitored closely until the results stabilize in the therapeutic range.
    Lesinurad: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with lesinurad is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Lesinurad is a weak CYP3A4 inducer and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Lesinurad; Allopurinol: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with lesinurad is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Lesinurad is a weak CYP3A4 inducer and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance. (Minor) Allopurinol may interfere with the metabolism of warfarin. The INR should be monitored carefully in patients receiving oral anticoagulants when allopurinol therapy is added.
    Letermovir: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with letermovir is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Letermovir is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Levamlodipine: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with amlodipine is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Amlodipine is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Levofloxacin: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR and for evidence of bleeding if levofloxacin is administered concomitantly with warfarin. There have been postmarketing reports that levofloxacin enhances the effects of warfarin. Elevations of prothrombin time in the setting of concomitant levofloxacin and warfarin use have been associated with episodes of bleeding.
    Levomefolate: (Moderate) L-methylfolate and warfarin should be used together cautiously. Significant impairment of folate status may occur after 6 months of therapy with warfarin. Monitor patients for decreased efficacy of L-methylfolate if these agents are used together.
    Levomilnacipran: (Moderate) Advise patients of the increased bleeding risk associated with the concomitant use of levomilnacipran and warfarin. Carefully monitor patients receiving warfarin therapy if levomilnacipran is initiated or discontinued. Case reports and epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between use of drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake and gastrointestinal bleeding.
    Levonorgestrel: (Major) Oral levonorgestrel-containing emergency contraceptive regimens may interact with warfarin and concurrent use may require patient education and monitoring. A case report of an interaction of warfarin with a levonorgestrel-only oral emergency contraceptive regimen has been described. The patient involved had familial antithrombin deficiency and was stabilized on warfarin as her only medication. The INR increased to 8.1 (without bleeding complications) from 2.1 within 3 days after receiving levonorgestrel. With corrective action, the warfarin was resumed at the usual dose without complication 2 days later. The report speculated that levonorgestrel displaced warfarin from plasma protein binding sites; however, inhibition of hepatic CYP2C9 by levonorgestrel may have decreased the metabolism of warfarin. This is the only report of this type of interaction available.
    Levonorgestrel; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Major) Oral levonorgestrel-containing emergency contraceptive regimens may interact with warfarin and concurrent use may require patient education and monitoring. A case report of an interaction of warfarin with a levonorgestrel-only oral emergency contraceptive regimen has been described. The patient involved had familial antithrombin deficiency and was stabilized on warfarin as her only medication. The INR increased to 8.1 (without bleeding complications) from 2.1 within 3 days after receiving levonorgestrel. With corrective action, the warfarin was resumed at the usual dose without complication 2 days later. The report speculated that levonorgestrel displaced warfarin from plasma protein binding sites; however, inhibition of hepatic CYP2C9 by levonorgestrel may have decreased the metabolism of warfarin. This is the only report of this type of interaction available.
    Levonorgestrel; Ethinyl Estradiol; Ferrous Bisglycinate: (Major) Oral levonorgestrel-containing emergency contraceptive regimens may interact with warfarin and concurrent use may require patient education and monitoring. A case report of an interaction of warfarin with a levonorgestrel-only oral emergency contraceptive regimen has been described. The patient involved had familial antithrombin deficiency and was stabilized on warfarin as her only medication. The INR increased to 8.1 (without bleeding complications) from 2.1 within 3 days after receiving levonorgestrel. With corrective action, the warfarin was resumed at the usual dose without complication 2 days later. The report speculated that levonorgestrel displaced warfarin from plasma protein binding sites; however, inhibition of hepatic CYP2C9 by levonorgestrel may have decreased the metabolism of warfarin. This is the only report of this type of interaction available.
    Lincomycin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Lixisenatide: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of 25 mg of warfarin with repeated dosing of lixisenatide 20 mcg delayed warfarin Tmax by approximately 7 hours and reduced Cmax by 19%. No clinically relevant effects on AUC or INR were observed. Although increased INR has not been reported in patients receiving warfarin and lixisenatide, cases of an increased INR have been reported with the concomitant use of warfarin and exenatide. Clinicians should closely monitor patients for changes in INR and bleeding when these drugs are coadministered. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary.
    Lomitapide: (Major) Coadministration of warfarin and lomitapide results in increased serum concentrations of warfarin. Monitor the INR regularly, especially after dose adjustments of lomitapide and adjust the warfarin dose as clinically indicated during concurrent use. Lomitapide increases the plasma concentrations of both R-warfarin and S-warfarin by approximately 30% and the INR by 22%. In the lomitapide clinical trials, difficulty controlling INR led to early discontinuation in 1 of 5 patients receiving concomitant warfarin therapy.
    Lomustine, CCNU: (Moderate) Due to the bone marrow suppressive and thrombocytopenic effects of lomustine, an additive risk of bleeding may be seen in patients receiving concomitant anticoagulants.
    Lonafarnib: (Major) Avoid coadministration of lonafarnib and warfarin; concurrent use may increase the exposure of lonafarnib and the risk of adverse effects. Concurrent use may also increase warfarin exposure leading to increased bleeding risk. If coadministration is unavoidable, closely monitor INR and for adverse reactions of both drugs. Lonafarnib is a CYP2C9 substrate and strong CYP3A4 inhibitor; warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate and CYP2C9 inhibitor.
    Lopinavir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) Monitor the INR and adjust the dose as necessary if warfarin is coadministered with ritonavir: concurrent use may increase the risk of bleeding or reduce efficacy. Ritonavir is a CYP 3A4 inhibitor as well as a CYP1A4, CYP2C9, and CYP3A4 inducer. Warfarin is a substrate of CYP3A4, CYP2C9, and CYP1A2.
    Lorlatinib: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with lorlatinib is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Lorlatinib is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Lovastatin: (Moderate) Monitor INR carefully in patients taking warfarin when lovastatin is initiated or a lovastatin dosage adjustment is made. Lovastatin's influence on warfarin's clinical effects is unclear. Bleeding and/or prolonged prothrombin time have been reported in a few patients when lovastatin was taken concurrently with coumarin anticoagulants. However, one small clinical trial found no effect on prothrombin time when lovastatin was given to patients receiving warfarin. Another HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor was found to increase the INR by < 2 seconds in healthy subjects taking low doses of warfarin. Alternatively, it appears that pravastatin and atorvastatin may be less likely to significantly interact with warfarin based on drug interaction studies.
    Lovastatin; Niacin: (Moderate) Monitor INR carefully in patients taking warfarin when lovastatin is initiated or a lovastatin dosage adjustment is made. Lovastatin's influence on warfarin's clinical effects is unclear. Bleeding and/or prolonged prothrombin time have been reported in a few patients when lovastatin was taken concurrently with coumarin anticoagulants. However, one small clinical trial found no effect on prothrombin time when lovastatin was given to patients receiving warfarin. Another HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor was found to increase the INR by < 2 seconds in healthy subjects taking low doses of warfarin. Alternatively, it appears that pravastatin and atorvastatin may be less likely to significantly interact with warfarin based on drug interaction studies. (Moderate) Niacin (nicotinic acid) is occasionally associated with small but statistically significant increases (mean 4%) in prothrombin time. While rare, there is a possibility that an interaction would occur in some patients stabilized on warfarin. It appears prudent to monitor the INR periodically.
    Luliconazole: (Moderate) Theoretically, luliconazole may increase the side effects of warfarin, which is a CYP2C19 and a CYP3A4 substrate. Monitor patients for adverse effects of warfarin, such as increased bleeding, PT, and INR. In vitro, therapeutic doses of luliconazole inhibit the activity of CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 and small systemic concentrations may be noted with topical application, particularly when applied to patients with moderate to severe tinea cruris. No in vivo drug interaction trials were conducted prior to the approval of luliconazole.
    Lumacaftor; Ivacaftor: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with ivacaftor is necessary as concurrent use may increase the exposure of warfarin leading to increased bleeding risk. Ivacaftor is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor and the R-enantiomer is a CYP3A4 substrate. Ivacaftor is also a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9/CYP3A4 substrate. The S-enantiomer of warfarin exhibits 2 to 5 times more anticoagulant activity than the R-enantiomer, but the R-enantiomer generally has a slower clearance.
    Lumacaftor; Ivacaftor: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with lumacaftor; ivacaftor is necessary as concurrent use may decrease or increase the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy or increased bleeding risk. Lumacaftor is a moderate CYP3A4 inducer, ivacaftor is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor, and the R-enantiomer of warfarin is a CYP3A4 substrate. Ivacaftor is also a weak CYP2C9 inhibitor and the S-enantiomer, the active metabolite of warfarin, is a CYP2C9 substrate.
    Magnesium Salicylate: (Moderate) Coadministration of salicylates and warfarin may result in an increased risk of bleeding. Salicylates may displace warfarin from protein binding sites leading to increased anticoagulation effects. Hypoprothrombinemia, an additional risk factor for bleeding, also has been reported with salicylates. Non-acetylated salicylates do not appear to affect platelet aggregation in the same manner as aspirin and are associated with a lower risk of bleeding when given currently with warfarin. If salicylates and warfarin are coadministered, monitor the patient for signs or symptoms of bleeding.
    Meclofenamate Sodium: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Mefenamic Acid: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Mefloquine: (Moderate) Mefloquine has been reported to increase the effects of warfarin in patients stabilized on warfarin therapy. For patients who are stabilized on warfarin therapy and require mefloquine malaria prophylaxis, it is recommended that steady state mefloquine concentrations be achieved prior to leaving for malarial areas. This allows for prothrombin time monitoring and warfarin dosage adjustments.
    Megestrol: (Moderate) At high doses, megestrol may be associated alterations in warfarin pharmacokinetics that may increase warfarin exposure. Carefully monitor the INR when these drugs are used together. Lower doses of warfarin may be necessary when megestrol is given. In one study, a small change in the rate of warfarin clearance was see with concomitant administration of high doses of megestrol; a minor decrease observed in warfarin clearance may be of clinical importance. Additionally, a 71% increase in warfarin's half-life was seen.
    Melatonin: (Moderate) Use melatonin and warfarin together with caution. Cases of bleeding (i.e., eye hemorrhage, epistaxis, purpura) and increased or decreased prothrombin times have been reported. If melatonin and warfarin are taken concurrently, monitor INR and adjust warfarin dosage, if needed.
    Meloxicam: (Moderate) Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of bleeding during concurrent use of warfarin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).To minimize the potential for GI bleeding, use the lowest effective NSAID dose for the shortest possible duration. If signs or symptoms of bleeding occur, promptly evaluate and treat. Systemic hematological effects may also occur with the use of topical NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and may prolong bleeding time in some patients.
    Mephobarbital: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with barbiturates is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Barbiturates are CYP1A2 and moderate CYP2C9/CYP3A4 inducers and warfarin's enantiomers are substrates of CYP1A2/CYP2C9/CYP3A4. Discontinuation of a barbiturate during warfarin therapy has led to fatal bleeding episodes when the hepatic enzyme-inducing properties of the barbiturate subside. Clinicians should note that warfarin doses will require readjustment if a barbiturate is added or discontinued during warfarin therapy. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary within 2 weeks of beginning barbiturate treatment, but the effect of the barbiturate on warfarin metabolism may persist for more than a month after discontinuing the barbiturate.
    Meprobamate: (Moderate) Meprobamate has been associated with a decreased anticoagulation response to warfarin. Monitor coagulation parameters and adjust warfarin dosage as needed.
    Mercaptopurine, 6-MP: (Major) The concomitant use of mercaptopurine and warfarin may decrease the anticoagulant effectiveness of warfarin. If concurrent use is required, monitor prothrombin time or INR and adjust the warfarin dose to maintain the desired level of anticoagulation.
    Meropenem: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including carbapenems, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Meropenem; Vaborbactam: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including carbapenems, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.
    Mesalamine, 5-ASA: (Moderate) Mesalamine may alter the anticoagulant effects of warfarin. Closely monitor a patient's PT and INR during and following concomitant mesalamine therapy; dosage adjustments of anticoagulants may be necessary. In elderly patients taking mesalamine with anticoagulants, consider regularly monitoring complete blood cell counts and platelet counts, as an increased risk for blood dyscrasia has been reported in geriatric adults. In a published case study, a decreased effect of warfarin was reported when mesalamine was prescribed. Iincreased prothrombin time (PT) in patients taking concomitant warfarin has been reported during mesalamine treatment.
    Methimazole: (Moderate) The interaction between thioamine antithyroid agents and warfarin is variable. The effects of warfarin can be enhanced due to the vitamin K antagonistic properties of methimazole or propylthiouracil, PTU. Isolated cases have reported hypoprothrombinemia due to methimazole or propylthiouracil, which may be additive with warfarin. In addition, as hyperthyroidism is corrected, the anticoagulant effect of warfarin can diminish due to a change in the clearance rate of endogenous clotting factors. Thus, administration of antithyroid agents such as methimazole or PTU can also reduce the effectiveness of warfarin. INRs should be monitored closely whenever methimazole is added or discontinued during warfarin therapy or when the thyroid status of a patient is expected to change. Warfarin dosage should be adjusted accordingly based on the INR and the clinical goals for the patient.
    Methohexital: (Moderate) Closely monitor the INR if coadministration of warfarin with barbiturates is necessary as concurrent use may decrease the exposure of warfarin leading to reduced efficacy. Barbiturates are CYP1A2 and moderate CYP2C9/CYP3A4 inducers and warfarin's enantiomers are substrates of CYP1A2/CYP2C9/CYP3A4. Discontinuation of a barbiturate during warfarin therapy has led to fatal bleeding episodes when the hepatic enzyme-inducing properties of the barbiturate subside. Clinicians should note that warfarin doses will require readjustment if a barbiturate is added or discontinued during warfarin therapy. Dosage adjustments of warfarin may be necessary within 2 weeks of beginning barbiturate treatment, but the effect of the barbiturate on warfarin metabolism may persist for more than a month after discontinuing the barbiturate.
    Methotrexate: (Major) Avoid concomitant use of methotrexate and warfarin due to the risk of severe methotrexate-related adverse reactions. If concomitant use is unavoidable, closely monitor for adverse reactions. Methotrexate is approximately 50% protein bound; warfarin is highly protein-bound. Coadministration may displace methotrexate from its protein binding sites, increasing methotrexate plasma concentrations.
    Methoxsalen: (Minor) Agents, such as anticoagulants, that decrease clotting could decrease the efficacy of photosensitizing agents used in photodynamic therapy.
    Methylphenidate Derivatives: (Moderate) A dose adjustment of warfarin and more frequent INR monitoring may be required when initiating or discontinuing methylphenidate derivatives. Case reports suggest a potential interaction between methylphenidate derivatives and coumarin anticoagulants. Human pharmacologic studies have shown that methylphenidate derivatives may inhibit the metabolism of warfarin. The mechanism of the potential interaction is not clear. A dose adjustment of warfarin and more frequent monitoring of the INR may be required when initiating or discontinuing methylphenidate derivatives.
    Methylsulfonylmethane, MSM: (Moderate) Increased effects from concomitant anticoagulant drugs such as increased bruising or blood in the stool have been reported in patients taking methylsulfonylmethane, MSM. Although these effects have not been confirmed in published medical literature or during clinical studies, clinicians should consider using methylsulfonylmethane, MSM with caution in patients who are taking anticoagulants such as warfarin until data confirming the safety of MSM in patients taking these drugs are available. During one of the available, published clinical trials in patients with osteoarthritis, those patients with bleeding disorders or using anticoagulants or antiplatelets were excluded from enrollment. Patients who choose to consume methylsulfonylmethane, MSM while receiving warfarin should be observ