PDR MEMBER LOGIN:
  • PDR Search

    Required field
  • Advertisement
  • CLASSES

    Beta-Blocking Agent and Diuretic Combinations

    DEA CLASS

    Rx

    DESCRIPTION

    Beta-blocker and thiazide diuretic; for mild to moderate HTN; bisoprolol is beta-1-receptor-selective, has low lipid solubility, is excreted by renal and non-renal pathways, and is devoid of partial agonist or membrane stabilizing activity.

    COMMON BRAND NAMES

    Ziac

    HOW SUPPLIED

    Bisoprolol , Hydrochlorothiazide/Bisoprolol Fumarate, Hydrochlorothiazide/Ziac Oral Tab: 10-6.25mg, 2.5-6.25mg, 5-6.25mg

    DOSAGE & INDICATIONS

    For the treatment of hypertension in patients who do not respond to monotherapy.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    Initially, 1 tablet bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide 2.5 mg/6.25 mg PO once daily. Titrate dosage every 2 weeks up to the maximum dosage based on clinical response. A patient whose blood pressure is not adequately controlled with bisoprolol or hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) monotherapy may be given the combination. The combination may also be substituted for the titrated individual components, for convenient dosing. The general daily dosage range of bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide for hypertensive patients is 2.5—20 mg bisoprolol with 6.25—12.5 mg HCTZ, administered orally as a single dose. Maximum daily dosage is 20 mg bisoprolol with 12.5 mg HCTZ (i.e., 2 bisoprolol; HCTZ 10 mg/6.25 mg tablets).

    Adult patients with coexisting heart failure or bronchospastic disease

    Initiate therapy with the lowest dose of bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide (i.e., 2.5 mg/6.25 mg PO once daily), unless the patient has been previously titrated to a higher dosage without adverse effects. See adult guidelines for dosage titration information.

    Geriatric

    See adult dosage. Greater sensitivity to bisoprolol; HCTZ in some older individuals is possible. Adjust dosage based on clinical response.

    MAXIMUM DOSAGE

    Adults

    20 mg/day PO bisoprolol and 12.5 mg/day PO hydrochlorothiazide.

    Elderly

    20 mg/day PO bisoprolol and 12.5 mg/day PO hydrochlorothiazide.

    Adolescents

    Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    Children

    Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

    Hepatic Impairment

    Initiate therapy with the lowest dose of bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide (2.5 mg/6.25 mg PO once daily). Hydrochlorothiazide should be used with caution in patients with hepatic disease since minor alterations of fluid and electrolyte balance may precipitate hepatic coma.

    Renal Impairment

    CrCl > 40 mL/min: No dosage adjustment needed.
    CrCl 30—40 mL/min: Initiate therapy with the lowest dose of bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide (2.5 mg/6.25 mg PO once daily).
    CrCl < 30 mL/min: Combination therapy with bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide is not recommended. Thiazide diuretics are not effective in this setting.
     
    Intermittent hemodialysis:
    Combination therapy with hydrochlorothiazide is not recommended in patients with CrCl < 30 mL/min. Thiazide diuretics are not effective in this setting.

    ADMINISTRATION

    Oral Administration

    May be administered without regard to meals.

    STORAGE

    Ziac:
    - Store at controlled room temperature (between 68 and 77 degrees F)

    CONTRAINDICATIONS / PRECAUTIONS

    Beta-blocker hypersensitivity, penicillin hypersensitivity, sulfonamide hypersensitivity, thiazide diuretic hypersensitivity

    Bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide is contraindicated in patients exhibiting hypersensitivity to the drug or any of its excipients. Do not use bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide in patients with known beta-blocker hypersensitivity. Cross-sensitivity between beta-blockers may occur. Thiazide diuretics are contraindicated in patients with known thiazide diuretic hypersensitivity. According to the manufacturer, hydrochlorothiazide is specifically contraindicated in patients with sulfonamide hypersensitivity. Although thiazide diuretics are sulfonamide derivatives, sulfonamide cross-sensitivity has been rarely documented. Until further data are available, bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide should be used with caution in patients with sulfonamide hypersensitivity. Thiazide diuretics do not contain the N4-aromatic amine or the N1-substituent which are present in sulfonamide antibiotics. Non-arylamine sulfonamide derivatives, such as thiazide diuretics, have been proposed to have a lower risk of allergic reactions in patients with sulfonamide allergy, presumably due to lack of an arylamine group at the N4 position (a proposed structural site of action for sulfonamide allergy). One large retrospective cohort study has reported that in patients with the presence of an allergic reaction after exposure to a sulfonamide antibiotic, 9.9% had an allergic reaction after receiving a non-antibiotic sulfonamide derivative, while in patients who lacked an allergic reaction after sulfonamide antibiotic exposure, 1.6% had an allergic reaction after administration of a non-antibiotic sulfonamide derivative (adjusted odds ratio 2.8; 95% CI, 2.1—3.7). A causal relationship between sulfonamide hypersensitivity and allergic reactions with non-arylamine sulfonamide derivatives has not been definitively established and remains controversial. In general, patients with a documented sulfonamide allergy are considered to be predisposed for development of allergic drug reactions. Also, patients with a history of sulfonamide hypersensitivity or penicillin hypersensitivity who receive hydrochlorothiazide may also be at increased risk for the development of an idiosyncratic reaction resulting in transient myopia and acute angle-closure glaucoma. Discontinue hydrochlorothiazide promptly if this reaction occurs.

    Anuria, renal disease, renal failure, renal impairment

    Bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide is contraindicated in patients with anuria since thiazide diuretics are considered ineffective when the creatinine clearance is less than 30 ml/minute. Hydrochlorothiazide should be used cautiously in patients with renal disease that produces renal failure or severe renal impairment because the drug decreases the glomerular filtration rate and may precipitate azotemia in these patients.

    Abrupt discontinuation

    Abrupt discontinuation of any beta-adrenergic blocking agent, including bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide, can result in the development of myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction, ventricular arrhythmias, or severe hypertension, particularly in patients with preexisting cardiac disease. Even in patients without overt coronary artery disease, it is recommended that the dosage of bisoprolol-hydrochlorothiazide be tapered over approximately one week.

    Depression

    The actual relationship between depression and beta-blockers has not been definitively established. Bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide should be used with caution in patients with major depression.

    AV block, bradycardia, cardiogenic shock, heart failure, pulmonary edema, sick sinus syndrome, ventricular dysfunction

    Because beta-blockers depress conduction through the AV node, bisoprolol is contraindicated in patients with severe bradycardia or advanced AV block (second or third-degree AV block) unless a functioning pacemaker is present. Beta-blockers should also be avoided in patients with sick sinus syndrome unless a functioning pacemaker is present. Bisoprolol should be avoided in patients with acute pulmonary edema and is contraindicated in patients with cardiogenic shock or decompensated heart failure due to systolic ventricular dysfunction. Although beta-blockers, including bisoprolol, have been used as adjunctive therapy in patients with compensated congestive heart failure, these agents should be used cautiously in this patient population. In the setting of congestive heart failure, sympathetic stimulation is a vital component supporting circulatory function. Beta-blockade may result in further depression of myocardial contractility and precipitate more severe failure. In stable patients with heart failure, however, beta-blockers (e.g., bisoprolol, carvedilol, or metoprolol) have been documented to be beneficial. If bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide is used in a patient with coexisting heart failure, low initial doses should be used and increases in dosage should be made gradually.

    Cerebrovascular disease

    Because of potential effects of beta-blockade on blood pressure and pulse, bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide should be used with caution in patients with cerebrovascular insufficiency (cerebrovascular disease) or stroke. If signs or symptoms suggesting reduced cerebral blood flow develop following initiation of beta-blocker, alternative therapy should be considered.

    Hyperthyroidism, thyroid disease, thyrotoxicosis

    Bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide should be used with caution in patients with hyperthyroidism or thyrotoxicosis because beta-blockers can mask tachycardia, which is a useful monitoring parameter in thyroid disease. Abrupt withdrawal of beta-blockers in a patient with hyperthyroidism can precipitate thyroid storm. Note that beta-blockers are, in general, useful in the symptomatic treatment of hyperthyroid-related states, like thyrotoxicosis.

    Diabetes mellitus, hyperglycemia

    Beta-blockers have been shown to increase the risk of developing diabetes mellitus in hypertensive patients; however this risk should be evaluated relative to the proven benefits of beta-blockers in reducing cardiovascular events. Bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide should be used with caution in patients with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, particularly brittle diabetes. Beta-blockers can prolong or enhance hypoglycemia by interfering with glycogenolysis; this effect may be less pronounced with beta1-selective beta-blockers than with nonselective agents. Beta-blockers can also mask signs of hypoglycemia, especially tachycardia, palpitations, and tremors; in contrast, diaphoresis and the hypertensive response to hypoglycemia are not suppressed with beta-blockade. Beta-blockers can occasionally cause hyperglycemia. This is thought to be due to blockade of beta2-receptors on pancreatic islet cells, which would inhibit insulin secretion. Hyperglycemia or impaired glucose tolerance can occur during hydrochlorothiazide therapy. Thus, blood glucose levels should be monitored closely if bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide is used in a patient with diabetes mellitus. Adjustment of insulin and/or oral hypoglycemic agents may be required.

    Acute bronchospasm, asthma, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema, pulmonary disease

    Although beta1-adrenergic selective beta-blockers such as bisoprolol are preferred over nonselective agents in patients with asthma or other pulmonary disease [e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema, bronchitis] in which acute bronchospasm would put them at risk, all beta-blockers should nevertheless be used with caution in these patients, particularly with high-dose therapy. In patients with bronchospastic disease, initiate therapy with the lowest dose of bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide; adjust dosage cautiously based on clinical response.

    Peripheral vascular disease, pheochromocytoma, Raynaud's phenomenon, vasospastic angina

    Bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide should be used with caution in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon or peripheral vascular disease because reduced cardiac output and the relative increase in alpha stimulation can exacerbate symptoms. Beta-blocker monotherapy should also be used with caution in patients with a pheochromocytoma or vasospastic angina (Prinzmetal's angina) because of the risk of hypertension secondary to unopposed alpha-receptor stimulation. In patients with pheochromocytoma, an alpha-blocking agent should be used prior to the initiation of any beta-blocker.

    Hepatic disease

    Bisoprolol is equally eliminated by renal and non-renal pathways; consequently, elimination of bisoprolol is significantly decreased in cirrhosis and patients with renal impairment (CrCl < 40 mL/minute). In patients with renal impairment or hepatic disease, low initial doses of bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide should be used and caution is advised during dose titration. Hydrochlorothiazide should be used with caution in patients with hepatic disease since minor alterations of fluid and electrolyte balance may precipitate hepatic coma.

    Psoriasis

    Beta-blockers may exacerbate psoriasis. Use bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide with caution in patients with psoriasis.

    Myasthenia gravis

    Beta-blockers may potentiate muscle weakness and double vision in patients with myasthenia gravis. Bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide should be used with caution in these patients.

    Surgery

    Patients receiving bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide before or during surgery involving general anesthetics that depress myocardial function (e.g., ether, cyclopropane or trichloroethylene) should be monitored closely for signs of heart failure.

    Electrolyte imbalance, hypercalcemia, hypochloremia, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, hyponatremia, metabolic alkalosis

    Patients with pre-existing significant hyponatremia, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, and/or hypercalcemia should have their electrolyte imbalance corrected before bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide is initiated, and should be monitored closely for clinical signs of fluid or electrolyte imbalance during therapy. Hydrochlorothiazide may cause significant dose-related hypokalemia; however, this effect is minimized by utilizing the lowest hydrochlorothiazide dose (6.25 mg) in combination with bisoprolol. Thiazide diuretics may induce metabolic alkalosis associated with hypokalemia and hypochloremia; this acid/base imbalance is effectively treated with potassium chloride replacement. Thiazide diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide have been shown to increase the urinary excretion of magnesium and decrease urinary calcium excretion. Thiazide diuretics may worsen dilutional hyponatremia, particularly in older adults.

    Hypotension, hypovolemia, orthostatic hypotension, sympathectomy, syncope

    Patients with pre-existing hypovolemia or hypotension should have their condition corrected before bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide is initiated. Orthostatic hypotension may occur during treatment with thiazide diuretics. Orthostatic hypotension may occur during treatment with thiazide diuretics. Excessive hypotension during thiazide diuretic therapy can result in syncope. An increased risk of falls has been reported for elderly patients receiving thiazide diuretics. The antihypertensive effects of thiazides may be enhanced in patients predisposed for orthostatic hypotension, including the post-sympathectomy patient.

    Pancreatitis

    Thiazide diuretics have been reported to cause pancreatitis. Bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide should be used with caution in patients with a history of pancreatitis.

    Gout, hyperuricemia

    Bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide should be administered cautiously to patients with gout or hyperuricemia since thiazide diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide have been reported to reduce the clearance of uric acid.

    Hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia

    Thiazide diuretics and beta-blockers may worsen hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia. The clinical implications of these effects, relative to the cardiovascular benefits of therapy, are not known. Serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations should be monitored periodically in hypertensive patients receiving bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide.

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    Hydrochlorothiazide has been reported to activate or exacerbate systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Use bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide with caution in patients with SLE.

    Sunlight (UV) exposure

    Photosensitivity has been reported with thiazide diuretics. Patients should avoid excessive sunlight (UV) exposure during therapy with bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide and therapy should be discontinued if phototoxicity occurs.

    Preeclampsia, pregnancy

    The combination drug, bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide, is classified by the FDA as a pregnancy category C drug. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide in pregnant women. Once pregnancy is detected, every effort should be made to discontinue bisoprolol;hydrochlorothiazide unless this combination of drugs is considered life-saving for the mother. In rat studies, bisoprolol was fetotoxic (increased late resorptions) and maternotoxic (decreased food intake and body weight gain). When given to pregnant rabbits, bisoprolol was not teratogenic but was embryolethal at dosages of 12.5 mg/kg/day. Many experts reserve diuretic use for pregnant patients with cardiac disease or essential hypertension, due to the fact that diuretic use may decrease placental perfusion and the data do not indicate a positive benefit of diuretic use on the outcome of preeclampsia during pregnancy. The pregnancy risk factor for thiazide diuretics increases to category D for those pregnant patients with reduced uteroplacental perfusion (e.g., preeclampsia or intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). In general, the bulk of the evidence does not indicate that thiazide diuretics are teratogenic in the 1st trimester, although, many experts limit their use to the 2nd and 3rd trimesters. Neonatal thrombocytopenia has been reported following maternal use of thiazide diuretics near term when thiazide diuretics have been reported to cross the placenta. Potential risks from thiazide use include electrolyte imbalances in the newborn, pancreatitis, jaundice, or neonatal complications resulting from such maternal complications such as hyperglycemia, electrolyte imbalance, or hypotension.

    Breast-feeding

    It is not known if bisoprolol is excreted in human milk. Small amounts (< 2% of a dose) of bisoprolol have been detected in the milk of lactating rats. Hydrochlorothiazide has been detected in human breast milk. Because of the potential for serious reactions in nursing infants from either drug, a decision should be made to discontinue breast-feeding or to discontinue bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) considers the use of many thiazide diuretics, including hydrochlorothiazide, compatible with breast-feeding due to lack of noted adverse effects on the nursing infant. In addition, the AAP also lists the following beta-blockers as usually compatible with breast feeding: metoprolol, propranolol, and timolol; these agents are also available in combination with hydrochlorothiazide and therefore, may represent preferable alternatives to bisoprolol for some patients. Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential infant drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding infant experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally ingested drug, healthcare providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

    Children, infants, neonates

    Safety and efficacy of bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide have not been established in neonates, infants, children and adolescents less than 18 years old.

    Driving or operating machinery

    Beta-blockers may be associated with dizziness or drowsiness in some patients. Patients should be cautioned to avoid driving or operating machinery until the effects of bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide are known.

    Geriatric

    Greater sensitivity to the usual dosage of bisoprolol and/or hydrochlorothiazide may occur in geriatric patients. Beta-blockers can be used safely in older adults, however some patients may have unpredictable responses to beta-blockers. Older adults may be less sensitive to the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers, however, reduced elimination (via hepatic metabolism and renal excretion) may increase the potency of bisoprolol in this population. The geriatric patient may have age-related peripheral vascular disease and the relative increase in alpha stimulation can exacerbate symptoms. Geriatric patients are at increased risk of beta-blocker-induced hypothermia. According to the Beers Criteria, thiazide diuretics are considered potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in geriatric patients and should be used with caution due to the potential for causing or exacerbating SIADH or hyponatremia; sodium levels should be closely monitored when starting or changing dosages of thiazide diuretics in older adults.

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Severe

    bradycardia / Rapid / 1.1-1.1
    pancreatitis / Delayed / 0-1.0
    AV block / Early / Incidence not known
    heart failure / Delayed / Incidence not known
    bronchospasm / Rapid / Incidence not known
    azotemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    interstitial nephritis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    renal failure (unspecified) / Delayed / Incidence not known
    periarteritis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    Stevens-Johnson syndrome / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hemolytic anemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    aplastic anemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    toxic epidermal necrolysis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    erythema multiforme / Delayed / Incidence not known
    vasculitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    agranulocytosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    exfoliative dermatitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    pancytopenia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    ocular hypertension / Delayed / Incidence not known
    peptic ulcer / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hearing loss / Delayed / Incidence not known
    angioedema / Rapid / Incidence not known
    laryngospasm / Rapid / Incidence not known
    lupus-like symptoms / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Moderate

    elevated hepatic enzymes / Delayed / 3.9-6.2
    angina / Early / 1.8-1.8
    impotence (erectile dysfunction) / Delayed / 1.1-1.1
    peripheral edema / Delayed / 1.1-1.1
    glycosuria / Early / Incidence not known
    diabetes mellitus / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypoglycemia / Early / Incidence not known
    hyperglycemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    orthostatic hypotension / Delayed / Incidence not known
    palpitations / Early / Incidence not known
    chest pain (unspecified) / Early / Incidence not known
    dyspnea / Early / Incidence not known
    jaundice / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hyperbilirubinemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hyperesthesia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    depression / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hallucinations / Early / Incidence not known
    psychosis / Early / Incidence not known
    memory impairment / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hyperuricemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    nephrolithiasis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypovolemia / Early / Incidence not known
    gout / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypophosphatemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypercalcemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypomagnesemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypokalemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hyponatremia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    metabolic alkalosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypochloremia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypercholesterolemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hypertriglyceridemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    psoriasis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    leukopenia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    thrombocytopenia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    sialadenitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    peripheral vasoconstriction / Rapid / Incidence not known
    myopia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    xanthopsia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    blurred vision / Early / Incidence not known
    constipation / Delayed / Incidence not known
    gastritis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    colitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    cystitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    edema / Delayed / Incidence not known
    withdrawal / Early / Incidence not known
    hypertension / Early / Incidence not known
    sinus tachycardia / Rapid / Incidence not known

    Mild

    dizziness / Early / 5.1-5.1
    fatigue / Early / 4.6-4.6
    headache / Early / 4.5-4.5
    diarrhea / Early / 4.3-4.3
    myalgia / Early / 2.4-2.4
    cough / Delayed / 2.2-2.2
    dyspepsia / Early / 1.2-1.2
    muscle cramps / Delayed / 1.2-1.2
    nausea / Early / 1.1-1.1
    syncope / Early / Incidence not known
    pharyngitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    sinusitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    rhinitis / Early / Incidence not known
    nightmares / Early / Incidence not known
    paresthesias / Delayed / Incidence not known
    anxiety / Delayed / Incidence not known
    drowsiness / Early / Incidence not known
    insomnia / Early / Incidence not known
    hypoesthesia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    vertigo / Early / Incidence not known
    restlessness / Early / Incidence not known
    alopecia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    diaphoresis / Early / Incidence not known
    purpura / Delayed / Incidence not known
    photosensitivity / Delayed / Incidence not known
    fever / Early / Incidence not known
    urticaria / Rapid / Incidence not known
    acne vulgaris / Delayed / Incidence not known
    abdominal pain / Early / Incidence not known
    flushing / Rapid / Incidence not known
    skin irritation / Early / Incidence not known
    rash / Early / Incidence not known
    pruritus / Rapid / Incidence not known
    ocular pain / Early / Incidence not known
    lacrimation / Early / Incidence not known
    anorexia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    vomiting / Early / Incidence not known
    dysgeusia / Early / Incidence not known
    xerostomia / Early / Incidence not known
    libido decrease / Delayed / Incidence not known
    polyuria / Early / Incidence not known
    back pain / Delayed / Incidence not known
    musculoskeletal pain / Early / Incidence not known
    weakness / Early / Incidence not known
    arthralgia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    tremor / Early / Incidence not known
    otalgia / Early / Incidence not known
    tinnitus / Delayed / Incidence not known
    asthenia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    malaise / Early / Incidence not known
    weight gain / Delayed / Incidence not known

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Acarbose: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Acetaminophen; Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Acetaminophen; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Magnesium Salicylate; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Phenyltoloxamine; Salicylamide: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Acetaminophen; Codeine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Acetaminophen; Dichloralphenazone; Isometheptene: (Major) Isometheptene has sympathomimetic properties. Patients taking antihypertensive agents may need to have their therapy modified. Careful blood pressure monitoring is recommended.
    Acetaminophen; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Acetaminophen; Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Acetaminophen; Oxycodone: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Acetaminophen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Acetazolamide: (Moderate) Acetazolamide promotes electrolyte excretion including hydrogen ions, sodium, and potassium. It can enhance the sodium depleting effects of other diuretics when used concurrently. Pre-existing hypokalemia and hyperuricemia can also be potentiated by carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Monitor serum potassium to determine the need for potassium supplementation and alteration in drug therapy.
    Acetohexamide: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Acrivastine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Adenosine: (Moderate) Because the pharmacologic effects of beta-blockers include depression of AV nodal conduction and myocardial function, additive effects are possible when used in combination with adenosine. The risk of additive inhibition of AV conduction is symptomatic bradycardia with hypotension or advanced AV block; whereas additive negative inotropic effects could precipitate overt heart failure in some patients.
    Albiglutide: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Albuterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Albuterol; Ipratropium: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Aldesleukin, IL-2: (Moderate) Beta blockers may potentiate the hypotension seen with aldesleukin, IL 2. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics may potentiate the hypotension seen with aldesleukin, IL 2.
    Alemtuzumab: (Moderate) Alemtuzumab may cause hypotension. Careful monitoring of blood pressure and hypotensive symptoms is recommended especially in patients with ischemic heart disease and in patients on antihypertensive agents.
    Alendronate; Cholecalciferol: (Major) Dose adjustment of vitamin D or vitamin D analogs may be necessary during coadministration with thiazide diuretics. Additionally, serum calcium concentrations should be monitored frequently. Monitor more frequently in patients with a history of hypercalcemia. Hypercalcemia may be exacerbated by coadministration of vitamin D or vitamin D analogs and thiazide diuretics. Thiazide diuretics are known to induce hypercalcemia by reducing the excretion of calcium in the urine.
    Alfentanil: (Moderate) Alfentanil may cause bradycardia. The risk of significant hypotension and/or bradycardia during therapy with alfentanil is increased in patients receiving beta-blockers. (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Alfuzosin: (Moderate) The manufacturer warns that the combination of alfuzosin with antihypertensive agents has the potential to cause hypotension in some patients. Alfuzosin (2.5 mg, immediate-release) potentiated the hypotensive effects of atenolol (100 mg) in eight healthy young male volunteers. The Cmax and AUC of alfuzosin was increased by 28% and 21%, respectively. Alfuzosin increased the Cmax and AUC of atenolol by 26% and 14%, respectively. Significant reductions in mean blood pressure and in mean heart rate were reported with the combination.
    Aliskiren; Amlodipine: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Aliskiren; Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Allopurinol: (Moderate) The occurrence of certain hypersensitivity reactions may be increased in patients with renal impairment who receive allopurinol and thiazide diuretics in combination. The precise mechanism for such events is unclear but likely immune-mediated and may be related to an effect of oxypurinol; elevated oxypurinol concentrations appear to be associated with hypersensitivity reactions; decreased clearance of this metabolite may occur with renal impairment and with the concurrent use of thiazide diuretics. Severe skin reactions include exfoliative dermatitis, toxic epidermal necrolysis and Steven's Johnson syndrome; some reactions have been fatal. In addition, thiazide diuretics, like hydrochlorothiazide, can cause hyperuricemia. Since thiazides reduce the clearance of uric acid, patients with gout or hyperuricemia may have exacerbations of their disease.
    Alogliptin: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Alogliptin; Metformin: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Alogliptin; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Alpha-blockers: (Moderate) Orthostatic hypotension may be more likely if beta-blockers are coadministered with alpha-blockers.
    Alpha-glucosidase Inhibitors: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Alprostadil: (Minor) The concomitant use of systemic alprostadil injection and antihypertensive agents, such as beta-clockers, may cause additive hypotension. Caution is advised with this combination. Systemic drug interactions with the urethral suppository (MUSE) or alprostadil intracavernous injection are unlikely in most patients because low or undetectable amounts of the drug are found in the peripheral venous circulation following administration. In those men with significant corpora cavernosa venous leakage, hypotension might be more likely. Use caution with in-clinic dosing for erectile dysfunction (ED) and monitor for the effects on blood pressure. In addition, the presence of medications in the circulation that attenuate erectile function may influence the response to alprostadil. However, in clinical trials with alprostadil intracavernous injection, anti-hypertensive agents had no apparent effect on the safety and efficacy of alprostadil. (Minor) The concomitant use of systemic alprostadil injection and antihypertensive agents, such as thiazide diuretics, may cause additive hypotension. Caution is advised with this combination. Systemic drug interactions with the urethral suppository (MUSE) or alprostadil intracavernous injection are unlikely in most patients because low or undetectable amounts of the drug are found in the peripheral venous circulation following administration. In those men with significant corpora cavernosa venous leakage, hypotension might be more likely. Use caution with in-clinic dosing for erectile dysfunction (ED) and monitor for the effects on blood pressure. In addition, the presence of medications in the circulation that attenuate erectile function may influence the response to alprostadil. However, in clinical trials with alprostadil intracavernous injection, anti-hypertensive agents had no apparent effect on the safety and efficacy of alprostadil.
    Amifostine: (Major) Patients receiving antihypertensive agents should be closely monitored during amifostine infusions due to additive effects. If possible, patients should not take their antihypertensive medication 24 hours before receiving amifostine. Patients who can not stop their antihypertensive agents should not receive amifostine or be closely monitored during the infusion and, possibly, given lower doses. (Major) Patients receiving beta-blockers should be closely monitored during amifostine infusions due to additive effects. Patients receiving amifostine at doses recommended for chemotherapy should have antihypertensive therapy interrupted 24 hours preceding administration of amifostine. If the antihypertensive cannot be stopped, patients should not receive amifostine.
    Amiodarone: (Major) Amiodarone prolongs AV nodal refractory period and decreases sinus node automaticity. Because beta-blockers have similar effects, concomitant administration of beta-blockers with amiodarone may cause additive electrophysiologic effects (slow sinus rate or worsen AV block), resulting in symptomatic bradycardia, sinus arrest, and atrioventricular block. This is particularly likely in patients with preexisting partial AV block or sinus node dysfunction. While combination amiodarone and beta-blockers should be used cautiously and with close monitoring, it should be noted that post-hoc analysis of amiodarone therapy in patients after acute myocardial infarction in two clinical trials revealed that amiodarone in addition to a beta-blocker significantly lowered the incidence of cardiac and arrhythmic death or resuscitated cardiac arrest when compared with amiodarone or beta-blocker therapy alone. (Major) Since antiarrhythmic drugs may be ineffective or may be arrhythmogenic in patients with hypokalemia, any potassium or magnesium deficiency should be corrected before instituting and during amiodarone therapy. Use caution when coadministering amiodarone with drugs which may induce hypokalemia and, or hypomagnesemia including thiazide diuretics.
    Amlodipine: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Amlodipine; Atorvastatin: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Amlodipine; Benazepril: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis. (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Olmesartan: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Valsartan: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Amlodipine; Olmesartan: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Amlodipine; Telmisartan: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Amlodipine; Valsartan: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Amobarbital: (Moderate) Although concurrent use of amobarbital with antihypertensive agents may lead to hypotension, barbiturates, as a class, can enhance the hepatic metabolism of beta-blockers that are significantly metabolized by the liver. Beta-blockers that may be affected include betaxolol, labetalol, metoprolol, pindolol, propranolol, and timolol. Clinicians should closely monitor patients blood pressure during times of coadministration.
    Amoxicillin; Clarithromycin; Lansoprazole: (Moderate) Proton pump inhibitors have been associated with hypomagnesemia. Hypomagnesemia occurs with thiazide diuretics (chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone). Low serum magnesium may lead to serious adverse events such as muscle spasm, seizures, and arrhythmias. Therefore, clinicians should monitor serum magnesium concentrations periodically in patients taking a PPI and diuretics concomitantly. Patients who develop hypomagnesemia may require PPI discontinuation in addition to magnesium replacement.
    Amoxicillin; Clarithromycin; Omeprazole: (Moderate) Proton pump inhibitors have been associated with hypomagnesemia. Hypomagnesemia occurs with thiazide diuretics (chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone). Low serum magnesium may lead to serious adverse events such as muscle spasm, seizures, and arrhythmias. Therefore, clinicians should monitor serum magnesium concentrations periodically in patients taking a PPI and diuretics concomitantly. Patients who develop hypomagnesemia may require PPI discontinuation in addition to magnesium replacement.
    Amphetamine; Dextroamphetamine Salts: (Moderate) Thiazides may increase blood levels and therefore potentiate the actions of amphetamines. Thiazide diuretics may increase urinary pH, acting as a urinary alkalinizer, thus reducing urinary excretion and increasing blood concentrations of the amphetamine. Co-administration of amphetamines and urinary alkalinizing agents should be avoided if possible. If needed, monitor for common amphetamine side effects, including decreased appetite, anxiety, dizziness, dry mouth, irritability, insomnia, nausea, increased blood pressure or increased heart rate. Amphetamines increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents may be needed.
    Amphotericin B cholesteryl sulfate complex (ABCD): (Moderate) The risk of developing severe hypokalemia can be increased when amphotericin B is coadministered with thiazide diuretics. Monitoring serum potassium levels and cardiac function is advised, and potassium supplementation may be required.
    Amphotericin B lipid complex (ABLC): (Moderate) The risk of developing severe hypokalemia can be increased when amphotericin B is coadministered with thiazide diuretics. Monitoring serum potassium levels and cardiac function is advised, and potassium supplementation may be required.
    Amphotericin B liposomal (LAmB): (Moderate) The risk of developing severe hypokalemia can be increased when amphotericin B is coadministered with thiazide diuretics. Monitoring serum potassium levels and cardiac function is advised, and potassium supplementation may be required.
    Amphotericin B: (Moderate) The risk of developing severe hypokalemia can be increased when amphotericin B is coadministered with thiazide diuretics. Monitoring serum potassium levels and cardiac function is advised, and potassium supplementation may be required.
    Amyl Nitrite: (Moderate) Concomitant use of nitrates with other antihypertensive agents can cause additive hypotensive effects. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. (Moderate) Nitroglycerin can cause hypotension. This action may be additive with other agents that can cause hypotension such as antihypertensive agents or other peripheral vasodilators. Patients should be monitored more closely for hypotension if nitroglycerin, including nitroglycerin rectal ointment, is used concurrently with any beta-blockers.
    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Anticholinergics: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Antithyroid agents: (Minor) Hyperthyroidism may cause increased clearance of beta blockers that possess a high extraction ratio. A dose reduction of some beta-blockers may be needed when a hyperthyroid patient treated with methimazole becomes euthyroid.
    Apomorphine: (Moderate) Patients receiving apomorphine may experience orthostatic hypotension, hypotension, and/or syncope. Extreme caution should be exercised if apomorphine is used concurrently with antihypertensive agents, or vasodilators such as nitrates. (Moderate) Patients receiving apomorphine may experience orthostatic hypotension, hypotension, and/or syncope. Extreme caution should be exercised if apomorphine is used concurrently with antihypertensive agents.
    Apraclonidine: (Minor) Alpha blockers as a class may reduce heart rate and blood pressure. While no specific drug interactions have been identified with systemic agents and apraclonidine during clinical trials, it is theoretically possible that additive blood pressure reductions could occur when apraclonidine is combined with the use of antihypertensive agents. Patients using cardiovascular drugs concomitantly with apraclonidine should have their pulse and blood pressure monitored periodically. (Minor) Theoretically, additive blood pressure reductions could occur when apraclonidine is combined with antihypertensive agents.
    Arformoterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Aripiprazole: (Minor) Aripiprazole may enhance the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents. (Minor) Aripiprazole may enhance the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents. It may be advisable to monitor blood pressure when these medications are coadministered.
    Arsenic Trioxide: (Major) Avoid concomitant use of arsenic trioxide with thiazide diuretics. Electrolyte abnormalities, such as hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia, may increase the risk for QT prolongation and torsade de pointes. Monitor electrocardiograms and serum electrolytes more frequently if concurrent use cannot be avoided.
    Articaine; Epinephrine: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents. Thus, patients receiving antihypertensive agents may experience additive hypotensive effects. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives such as metolazone when administered concomitantly.
    Asenapine: (Moderate) Secondary to alpha-blockade, asenapine can produce vasodilation that may result in additive effects during concurrent use of antihypertensive agents. The potential reduction in blood pressure can precipitate orthostatic hypotension and associated dizziness, tachycardia, and syncope. If concurrent use of asenapine and antihypertensive agents is necessary, patients should be counseled on measures to prevent orthostatic hypotension, such as sitting on the edge of the bed for several minutes prior to standing in the morning and rising slowly from a seated position. Close monitoring of blood pressure is recommended until the full effects of the combination therapy are known. (Moderate) Secondary to alpha-blockade, asenapine can produce vasodilation that may result in additive effects during concurrent use of bisoprolol. The potential reduction in blood pressure can precipitate orthostatic hypotension and associated dizziness, tachycardia, and syncope. If concurrent use is necessary, patients should be counseled on measures to prevent orthostatic hypotension, such as sitting on the edge of the bed for several minutes prior to standing in the morning and rising slowly from a seated position. Close monitoring of blood pressure is recommended until the full effects of the combination therapy are known; the bisoprolol dosage may need to be adjusted.
    Aspirin, ASA: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Aspirin, ASA; Carisoprodol: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Aspirin, ASA; Carisoprodol; Codeine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Aspirin, ASA; Dipyridamole: (Major) Beta-blockers should generally be withheld before dipyridamole-stress testing. Monitor the heart rate carefully following the dipyridamole injection. (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Aspirin, ASA; Omeprazole: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. (Moderate) Proton pump inhibitors have been associated with hypomagnesemia. Hypomagnesemia occurs with thiazide diuretics (chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone). Low serum magnesium may lead to serious adverse events such as muscle spasm, seizures, and arrhythmias. Therefore, clinicians should monitor serum magnesium concentrations periodically in patients taking a PPI and diuretics concomitantly. Patients who develop hypomagnesemia may require PPI discontinuation in addition to magnesium replacement.
    Aspirin, ASA; Oxycodone: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow. (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Aspirin, ASA; Pravastatin: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Atazanavir: (Moderate) Atazanavir can prolong the PR interval. Coadministration with other agents that prolong the PR interval, like beta blockers, may result in elevated risk of conduction disturbances and atrioventricular block.
    Atazanavir; Cobicistat: (Moderate) Atazanavir can prolong the PR interval. Coadministration with other agents that prolong the PR interval, like beta blockers, may result in elevated risk of conduction disturbances and atrioventricular block.
    Atracurium: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of hydrochlorothiazide to patients receiving nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers (e.g., tubocurarine) can cause prolonged neuromuscular blockade due to hydrochlorothiazide-induced hypokalemia. Serum potassium concentrations should be determined and corrected (if necessary) prior to initiation of neuromuscular blockade therapy.
    Atropine: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Atropine; Benzoic Acid; Hyoscyamine; Methenamine; Methylene Blue; Phenyl Salicylate: (Major) Thiazide diuretics may cause the urine to become alkaline. This may reduce the effectiveness of methenamine by inhibiting its conversion to formaldehyde. (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Atropine; Difenoxin: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Atropine; Diphenoxylate: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Atropine; Edrophonium: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Atropine; Hyoscyamine; Phenobarbital; Scopolamine: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Baclofen: (Moderate) Baclofen has been associated with hypotension. Concurrent use with baclofen and antihypertensive agents may result in additive hypotension. Dosage adjustments of the antihypertensive medication may be required.
    Barbiturates: (Moderate) Barbiturates may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Belladonna Alkaloids; Ergotamine; Phenobarbital: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers and ergot alkaloids should be approached with caution. Concomitant administration with beta-blockers may enhance the vasoconstrictive action of certain ergot alkaloids including dihydroergotamine, ergotamine, methylergonovine, and methysergide. The risk of peripheral ischemia, resulting in cold extremities or gangrene, has been reported to be increased when ergotamine or dihydroergotamine is coadministered with selected beta-blockers, including propranolol, a beta-blocker commonly used for migraine prophylaxis. However, the precise mechanism of these interactions remains elusive. Additionally, because of the potential to cause coronary vasospasm, these ergot alkaloids could antagonize the therapeutic effects of anti-anginal agents including beta-blockers; clinicians should keep in mind that ergot alkaloids are contraindicated for use in patients with coronary heart disease or hypertension. (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Belladonna; Opium: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Benazepril: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Benazepril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Benzoic Acid; Hyoscyamine; Methenamine; Methylene Blue; Phenyl Salicylate: (Major) Thiazide diuretics may cause the urine to become alkaline. This may reduce the effectiveness of methenamine by inhibiting its conversion to formaldehyde. (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Benzphetamine: (Moderate) Thiazides may increase blood levels and therefore potentiate the actions of amphetamines. Thiazide diuretics may increase urinary pH, acting as a urinary alkalinizer, thus reducing urinary excretion and increasing blood concentrations of the amphetamine. Co-administration of amphetamines and urinary alkalinizing agents should be avoided if possible. If needed, monitor for common amphetamine side effects, including decreased appetite, anxiety, dizziness, dry mouth, irritability, insomnia, nausea, increased blood pressure or increased heart rate. Amphetamines increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents may be needed.
    Benztropine: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Beta-agonists: (Moderate) Use of a beta-1-selective (cardioselective) beta blocker is recommended whenever possible when this combination of drugs must be used together. Monitor the patients lung and cardiovascular status closely. Beta-agonists and beta-blockers are pharmacologic opposites, and will counteract each other to some extent when given concomitantly, especially when non-cardioselective beta blockers are used. Beta-blockers will block the pulmonary effects of inhaled beta-agonists, and in some cases may exacerbate bronchospasm in patients with reactive airways. Beta-agonists can sometimes increase heart rate or have other cardiovascular effects, particularly when used in high doses or if hypokalemia is present. (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Bismuth Subsalicylate: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with bismuth subsalicylate and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Bismuth Subsalicylate; Metronidazole; Tetracycline: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with bismuth subsalicylate and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Bortezomib: (Moderate) Patients on antihypertensive agents receiving bortezomib treatment may require close monitoring of their blood pressure and dosage adjustment of their medication. During clinical trials of bortezomib, hypotension was reported in roughly 12 percent of patients.
    Bosentan: (Moderate) Although no specific interactions have been documented, bosentan has vasodilatory effects and may contribute additive hypotensive effects when given with beta-blockers. (Moderate) Although no specific interactions have been documented, bosentan has vasodilatory effects and may contribute additive hypotensive effects when given with diuretics.
    Brexpiprazole: (Moderate) Due to brexpiprazole's antagonism at alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, the drug may enhance the hypotensive effects of alpha-blockers and other antihypertensive agents.
    Brompheniramine; Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Brompheniramine; Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Brompheniramine; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Brompheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Budesonide; Formoterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Bupivacaine Liposomal: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents. Use extreme caution with the concomitant use of bupivacaine and antihypertensive agents. Peripheral vasodilation may occur after use of bupivacaine. Thus, patients receiving antihypertensive agents may experience additive hypotensive effects. Blood concentrations of local anesthetics achieved after therapeutic doses are associated with minimal change in peripheral vascular resistance. Higher blood concentrations of local anesthetics may occur due to inadvertent intravascular administration or repeated doses.
    Bupivacaine: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents. Use extreme caution with the concomitant use of bupivacaine and antihypertensive agents. Peripheral vasodilation may occur after use of bupivacaine. Thus, patients receiving antihypertensive agents may experience additive hypotensive effects. Blood concentrations of local anesthetics achieved after therapeutic doses are associated with minimal change in peripheral vascular resistance. Higher blood concentrations of local anesthetics may occur due to inadvertent intravascular administration or repeated doses.
    Bupivacaine; Lidocaine: (Major) Drugs such as beta-blockers that decrease cardiac output reduce hepatic blood flow and thereby decrease lidocaine hepatic clearance. Also, opposing effects on conduction exist between lidocaine and beta-blockers while their effects to decrease automaticity may be additive. Propranolol has been shown to decrease lidocaine clearance and symptoms of lidocaine toxicity have been seen as a result of this interaction. This interaction is possible with other beta-blocking agents since most decrease hepatic blood flow. Monitoring of lidocaine concentrations is recommended during concomitant therapy with beta-blockers. (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents. Use extreme caution with the concomitant use of bupivacaine and antihypertensive agents. Peripheral vasodilation may occur after use of bupivacaine. Thus, patients receiving antihypertensive agents may experience additive hypotensive effects. Blood concentrations of local anesthetics achieved after therapeutic doses are associated with minimal change in peripheral vascular resistance. Higher blood concentrations of local anesthetics may occur due to inadvertent intravascular administration or repeated doses.
    Buprenorphine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Buprenorphine; Naloxone: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Cabergoline: (Major) Because of its potential to cause coronary vasospasm, ergot alkaloids could theoretically antagonize the therapeutic effects of beta-blockers. (Minor) Cabergoline has minimal affinity for adrenergic receptors; however, it has been associated with hypotension in some instances. Cabergoline should be used cautiously in those receiving antihypertensive agents.
    Caffeine; Ergotamine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers and ergot alkaloids should be approached with caution. Concomitant administration with beta-blockers may enhance the vasoconstrictive action of certain ergot alkaloids including dihydroergotamine, ergotamine, methylergonovine, and methysergide. The risk of peripheral ischemia, resulting in cold extremities or gangrene, has been reported to be increased when ergotamine or dihydroergotamine is coadministered with selected beta-blockers, including propranolol, a beta-blocker commonly used for migraine prophylaxis. However, the precise mechanism of these interactions remains elusive. Additionally, because of the potential to cause coronary vasospasm, these ergot alkaloids could antagonize the therapeutic effects of anti-anginal agents including beta-blockers; clinicians should keep in mind that ergot alkaloids are contraindicated for use in patients with coronary heart disease or hypertension.
    Calcium Phosphate, Supersaturated: (Moderate) Concomitant use of medicines with potential to alter renal perfusion or function such as diuretics, may increase the risk of acute phosphate nephropathy in patients taking sodium phosphate monobasic monohydrate; sodium phosphate dibasic anhydrous.
    Calcium: (Moderate) The simultaneous administration of thiazide diuretics and calcium salts or calcium carbonate may lead to hypercalcemia. Thiazides cause a decrease in renal tubular excretion of calcium as well as increase in distal tubular reabsorption. Moderate increases in serum calcium have been seen during the treatment with thiazides; if calcium salts are used concomitantly, careful monitoring of serum calcium in recommended.
    Calcium; Vitamin D: (Major) Dose adjustment of vitamin D or vitamin D analogs may be necessary during coadministration with thiazide diuretics. Additionally, serum calcium concentrations should be monitored frequently. Monitor more frequently in patients with a history of hypercalcemia. Hypercalcemia may be exacerbated by coadministration of vitamin D or vitamin D analogs and thiazide diuretics. Thiazide diuretics are known to induce hypercalcemia by reducing the excretion of calcium in the urine.
    Canagliflozin: (Moderate) When canagliflozin is initiated in patients already receiving diuretics, symptomatic hypotension can occur. Patients with impaired renal function (eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2), low systolic blood pressure, or who are elderly may also be at a greater risk. Before initiating canagliflozin in patients with one or more of these characteristics, volume status should be assessed and corrected. Monitor for signs and symptoms after initiating therapy. In addition, thiazide diuretics, can also decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by producing an increase in blood glucose concentrations. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. Thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients receiving canagliflozin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Canagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) When canagliflozin is initiated in patients already receiving diuretics, symptomatic hypotension can occur. Patients with impaired renal function (eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2), low systolic blood pressure, or who are elderly may also be at a greater risk. Before initiating canagliflozin in patients with one or more of these characteristics, volume status should be assessed and corrected. Monitor for signs and symptoms after initiating therapy. In addition, thiazide diuretics, can also decrease the hypoglycemic effects of antidiabetic agents by producing an increase in blood glucose concentrations. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. Thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients receiving canagliflozin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Captopril: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Captopril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Carbamazepine: (Moderate) Both thiazide diuretics and carbamazepine are associated with hyponatremia. Coadministration may result in an additive risk of developing hyponatremia. When concurrent therapy with a thiazide diuretic and carbamazepine is necessary, monitor patients for hyponatremia.
    Carbetapentane; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Carbetapentane; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Carbetapentane; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine; Pyrilamine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Carbetapentane; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Carbidopa; Levodopa: (Moderate) Concomitant use of antihypertensive agents with levodopa can result in additive hypotensive effects. (Moderate) Concomitant use of beta-blockers with levodopa can result in additive hypotensive effects.
    Carbidopa; Levodopa; Entacapone: (Moderate) Concomitant use of antihypertensive agents with levodopa can result in additive hypotensive effects. (Moderate) Concomitant use of beta-blockers with levodopa can result in additive hypotensive effects.
    Carbinoxamine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Carbinoxamine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Carbinoxamine; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Carbinoxamine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Carbinoxamine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Cardiac glycosides: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can cause hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, or hypercalcemia which may increase digoxin's pharmacologic effect. Close monitoring of serum digoxin concentrations is essential to avoid enhanced toxicity. It is also recommended that serum potassium, magnesium, and calcium be monitored regularly in patients receiving digoxin.
    Cariprazine: (Moderate) Orthostatic vital signs should be monitored in patients who are at risk for hypotension, such as those receiving cariprazine in combination with antihypertensive agents. Atypical antipsychotics may cause orthostatic hypotension and syncope, most commonly during treatment initiation and dosage increases. Patients should be informed about measures to prevent orthostatic hypotension, such as sitting on the edge of the bed for several minutes prior to standing in the morning, or rising slowly from a seated position. Consider a cariprazine dose reduction if hypotension occurs.
    Celecoxib: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Cetirizine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Cevimeline: (Moderate) Cevimeline may alter cardiac conduction and/or heart rate. Conduction disturbances are possible with concurrent use of beta-blockers and cevimeline.
    Chlophedianol; Dexchlorpheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Chlophedianol; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Chlordiazepoxide; Clidinium: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Chloroprocaine: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents. (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents.
    Chlorpheniramine; Codeine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dihydrocodeine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dihydrocodeine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Chlorpheniramine; Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Chlorpheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Chlorpropamide: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Chlorthalidone; Clonidine: (Major) Monitor heart rate in patients receiving concomitant clonidine and agents known to affect sinus node function or AV nodal conduction (e.g., beta-blockers). Severe bradycardia resulting in hospitalization and pacemaker insertion has been reported during combination therapy with clonidine and other sympatholytic agents. Concomitant use of clonidine with beta-blockers can also cause additive hypotension. Beta-blockers should not be substituted for clonidine when modifications are made in a patient's antihypertensive regimen because beta-blocker administration during clonidine withdrawal can augment clonidine withdrawal, which may lead to a hypertensive crisis. If a beta-blocker is to be substituted for clonidine, clonidine should be gradually tapered and the beta-blocker should be gradually increased over several days to avoid the possibility of rebound hypertension; administration of beta-blockers during withdrawal of clonidine can precipitate severe increases in blood pressure as a result of unopposed alpha stimulation.
    Cholestyramine: (Moderate) Cholestyramine, an ion exchange resin, binds hydrochlorothiazide and reduces its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract by up to 85% when co-administered as single doses. Although the manufacturer for Questran recommends that other medicines be taken at least 1 hour before or 4-6 hours after cholestyramine, it has been recommended that thiazides be administered at least 4 hours before or after cholestyramine to minimize the reduction in absorption. By administering hydrochlorothiazide at least 4 hours before cholestyramine, the decrease in absorption of hydrochlorothiazide is approximately 30-35%.
    Choline Salicylate; Magnesium Salicylate: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Cidofovir: (Severe) The administration of cidofovir with another potentially nephrotoxic agent, such as diuretics, is contraindicated. Diuretics should be discontinued at least 7 days prior to beginning cidofovir.
    Cisapride: (Major) Cisapride should be used with great caution in patients receiving thiazide diuretics. Drugs that are associated with depletion of electrolytes may cause cisapride-induced cardiac arrhythmias. Serum electrolytes and creatinine should be assessed prior to administration of cisapride and whenever conditions develop that may affect electrolyte imbalance or renal function.
    Cisatracurium: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of hydrochlorothiazide to patients receiving nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers (e.g., tubocurarine) can cause prolonged neuromuscular blockade due to hydrochlorothiazide-induced hypokalemia. Serum potassium concentrations should be determined and corrected (if necessary) prior to initiation of neuromuscular blockade therapy.
    Citalopram: (Moderate) Citalopram causes dose-dependent QT interval prolongation. Concurrent use of citalopram and medications known to cause electrolyte imbalance may increase the risk of developing QT prolongation. Therefore, caution is advisable during concurrent use of citalopram and diuretics. In addition, patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with citalopram may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Hyponatremia due to SIADH has been reported during therapy with SSRIs. Cases involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/l have occurred. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of citalopram should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Clevidipine: (Moderate) Calcium-channel blockers, like clevidipine, and beta-blockers frequently are used together with no adverse reactions. Patients should be monitored carefully, however, for excessive bradycardia, cardiac conduction abnormalities, or hypotension if these drugs are given together.
    Clindamycin; Tretinoin: (Moderate) A manufacturer of topical tretinoin states that tretinoin, ATRA should be administered with caution in patients who are also taking drugs known to be photosensitizers, such as thiazide diuretics, as concomitant use may augment phototoxicity. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure of treated areas.
    Clonidine: (Major) Monitor heart rate in patients receiving concomitant clonidine and agents known to affect sinus node function or AV nodal conduction (e.g., beta-blockers). Severe bradycardia resulting in hospitalization and pacemaker insertion has been reported during combination therapy with clonidine and other sympatholytic agents. Concomitant use of clonidine with beta-blockers can also cause additive hypotension. Beta-blockers should not be substituted for clonidine when modifications are made in a patient's antihypertensive regimen because beta-blocker administration during clonidine withdrawal can augment clonidine withdrawal, which may lead to a hypertensive crisis. If a beta-blocker is to be substituted for clonidine, clonidine should be gradually tapered and the beta-blocker should be gradually increased over several days to avoid the possibility of rebound hypertension; administration of beta-blockers during withdrawal of clonidine can precipitate severe increases in blood pressure as a result of unopposed alpha stimulation.
    Clozapine: (Major) Caution is advisable during concurrent use of clozapine and thiazide diuretics. Clozapine used concomitantly with the antihypertensive agents can increase the risk and severity of hypotension by potentiating the effect of the antihypertensive drug. Treatment with clozapine has been associated with QT prolongation, torsade de pointes (TdP), cardiac arrest, and sudden death. Concurrent use of clozapine and medications known to cause electrolyte imbalance may increase the risk of QT prolongation. (Moderate) Clozapine used concomitantly with the antihypertensive agents can increase the risk and severity of hypotension by potentiating the effect of the antihypertensive drug.
    Cocaine: (Major) Although beta-blockers are indicated to reduce cocaine-induced tachycardia, myocardial ischemia, and arrhythmias, concomitant use of cocaine and non-selective beta-adrenergic blocking agents, including ophthalmic preparations, can cause unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity, resulting in heart block, excessive bradycardia, or hypertension. In theory, the use of alpha-blocker and beta-blocker combinations or selective beta-blockers in low doses may not cause unopposed alpha stimulation in this situation. Labetalol, a beta-blocker with some alpha-blocking activity, has been used successfully to treat cocaine-induced hypertension. In addition, cocaine can reduce the therapeutic effects of beta-blockers. (Major) Use of cocaine with antihypertensive agents may increase the antihypertensive effects of the antihypertensive medications or may potentiate cocaine-induced sympathetic stimulation.
    Cod Liver Oil: (Major) Dose adjustment of vitamin D or vitamin D analogs may be necessary during coadministration with thiazide diuretics. Additionally, serum calcium concentrations should be monitored frequently. Monitor more frequently in patients with a history of hypercalcemia. Hypercalcemia may be exacerbated by coadministration of vitamin D or vitamin D analogs and thiazide diuretics. Thiazide diuretics are known to induce hypercalcemia by reducing the excretion of calcium in the urine. (Moderate) Fish oil supplements may cause mild, dose-dependent reductions in systolic or diastolic blood pressure in untreated hypertensive patients. Relatively high doses of fish oil are required to produce any blood pressure lowering effect. Additive reductions in blood pressure may be seen when fish oils are used in a patient already taking antihypertensive agents. (Moderate) High doses of fish oil supplements may produce a blood pressure lowering effect. It is possible that additive reductions in blood pressure may be seen when fish oils are used in a patient already taking antihypertensive agents. (Moderate) High doses of fish oil supplements may produce a blood pressure lowering effect. It is possible that additive reductions in blood pressure may be seen when fish oils are used in a patient already taking antihypertensive agents.
    Codeine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Codeine; Guaifenesin: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Codeine; Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Codeine; Promethazine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Co-Enzyme Q10, Ubiquinone: (Moderate) Co-enzyme Q10, ubiquinone (CoQ10) may lower blood pressure. CoQ10 use in combination with antihypertensive agents may lead to additional reductions in blood pressure in some individuals. Patients who choose to take CoQ10 concurrently with antihypertensive medications should receive periodic blood pressure monitoring. Patients should be advised to inform their prescriber of their use of CoQ10.
    Colestipol: (Moderate) Although to a lesser extent than cholestyramine, colestipol also has been shown to inhibit the GI absorption and therapeutic response of thiazide diuretics. Single doses of colestipol resins reduce the absorption of HCTZ by up to 43%. Administering thiazide diuretics at least 2 hours before colestipol has been suggested to minimize the interaction.
    Conivaptan: (Moderate) There is potential for additive hypotensive effects when conivaptan is coadministered with antihypertensive agents. (Moderate) There is potential for additive hypotensive effects when conivaptan is coadministered with antihypertensive agents.
    Corticosteroids: (Moderate) Additive hypokalemia may occur when non-potassium sparing diuretics, including thiazide diuretics, are coadministered with other drugs with a significant risk of hypokalemia, such as corticosteroids. Monitoring serum potassium levels and cardiac function is advised, and potassium supplementation may be required.
    Cosyntropin: (Moderate) Use cosyntropin cautiously in patients receiving diuretics. Cosyntropin may accentuate the electrolyte loss associated with diuretic therapy.
    Crizotinib: (Major) Avoid coadministration of crizotinib with agents known to cause bradycardia, such as beta-blockers, to the extent possible due to the risk of additive bradycardia. If concomitant use is unavoidable, monitor heart rate and blood pressure regularly. An interruption of crizotinib therapy or dose adjustment may be necessary if bradycardia occurs.
    Cyclophosphamide: (Moderate) Coadministration of thiazide diuretics and antineoplastic agents such as cyclophosphamide may result in reduced renal excretion of the antineoplastic agent and therefore increased myelosuppressive effects.
    Dapagliflozin: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Dapagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Dapagliflozin; Saxagliptin: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Dasabuvir; Ombitasvir; Paritaprevir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) Cardiac and neurologic events have been reported when ritonavir was concurrently administered with beta-blockers.
    Desflurane: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with desflurane may result in exaggerated cardiovascular effects (e.g., hypotension and negative inotropic effects). Beta-blockers may be continued during general anesthesia as long as the patient is monitored for cardiac depressant and hypotensive effects. Withdrawal of a beta-blocker perioperatively may be detrimental to the patient's clinical status and is not recommended. Caution is advised if these drugs are administered together.
    Desloratadine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Desvenlafaxine: (Moderate) Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with venlafaxine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Hyponatremia due to SIADH may occur during therapy with SNRIs, including venlafaxine. Cases involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/l have been reported. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of the SNRI should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Dexchlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Dexlansoprazole: (Moderate) Proton pump inhibitors have been associated with hypomagnesemia. Hypomagnesemia occurs with thiazide diuretics (chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone). Low serum magnesium may lead to serious adverse events such as muscle spasm, seizures, and arrhythmias. Therefore, clinicians should monitor serum magnesium concentrations periodically in patients taking a PPI and diuretics concomitantly. Patients who develop hypomagnesemia may require PPI discontinuation in addition to magnesium replacement.
    Dexmedetomidine: (Major) In general, the concomitant administration of dexmedetomidine with antihypertensive agents could lead to additive hypotensive effects. Dexmedetomidine can produce bradycardia or AV block and should be used cautiously in patients who are receiving antihypertensive drugs that lower the heart rate such as beta-blockers.
    Dexmethylphenidate: (Moderate) Dexmethylphenidate can reduce the hypotensive effect of antihypertensive agents, including thiazide diuretics. Periodic evaluation of blood pressure is advisable during concurrent use of dexmethylphenidate and antihypertensive agents, particularly during initial coadministration and after dosage increases of dexmethylphenidate.
    Dextromethorphan; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Dextromethorphan; Quinidine: (Major) Quinidine may have additive effects (e.g., reduced heart rate, hypotension) on cardiovascular parameters when used together with beta-blockers, like pindolol. In general, patients receiving combined therapy should be monitored for potential hypotension, orthostasis, bradycardia and/or AV block and heart failure, Reduce the beta-blocker dosage if necessary. (Moderate) Quinidine can decrease blood pressure and should be used cautiously in patients receiving antihypertensive agents due to the potential for additive hypotension.
    Diazoxide: (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects can occur with the concomitant administration of diazoxide with other antihypertensive agent. This interaction can be therapeutically advantageous, but dosages must be adjusted accordingly. The manufacturer advises that IV diazoxide should not be administered to patients within 6 hours of receiving beta-blockers. (Moderate) Enhanced hyperglycemia is possible during concurrent use of diazoxide and thiazide diuretics. Additive hypotensive effects can also occur with the concomitant administration of diazoxide with thiazide diuretics.
    Dichlorphenamide: (Moderate) Use dichlorphenamide and diuretics together with caution. Dichlorphenamide increases potassium excretion and can cause hypokalemia and should be used cautiously with other drugs that may cause hypokalemia including loop diuretics and thiazide diuretics. Measure potassium concentrations at baseline and periodically during dichlorphenamide treatment. If hypokalemia occurs or persists, consider reducing the dose or discontinuing dichlorphenamide therapy.
    Diclofenac: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Diclofenac; Misoprostol: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Dicyclomine: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Diethylpropion: (Major) Diethylpropion has vasopressor effects and may limit the benefit of thiazide diuretics. Although leading drug interaction texts differ in the potential for an interaction between diethylpropion and this group of antihypertensive agents, these effects are likely to be clinically significant and have been described in hypertensive patients on these medications.
    Diflunisal: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Digitoxin: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can cause hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, or hypercalcemia which may increase digoxin's pharmacologic effect. Close monitoring of serum digoxin concentrations is essential to avoid enhanced toxicity. It is also recommended that serum potassium, magnesium, and calcium be monitored regularly in patients receiving digoxin.
    Digoxin: (Moderate) Because the pharmacologic effects of bisoprolol include depression of AV nodal conduction and myocardial function, additive effects are possible when used in combination with cardiac glycosides, especially in patients with pre-existing left ventricular dysfunction. The risk of additive inhibition of AV conduction is symptomatic bradycardia with hypotension or advanced AV block; whereas additive negative inotropic effects could precipitate overt heart failure in some patients. Despite potential for interactions, digoxin sometimes is intentionally used in combination with a beta-blocker to further reduce conduction through the AV node. Nevertheless, these combinations should be used cautiously, and therapy dosages may need adjustment in some patients. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can cause hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, or hypercalcemia which may increase digoxin's pharmacologic effect. Close monitoring of serum digoxin concentrations is essential to avoid enhanced toxicity. It is also recommended that serum potassium, magnesium, and calcium be monitored regularly in patients receiving digoxin.
    Dihydrocodeine; Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Dihydroergotamine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers and ergot alkaloids should be approached with caution. Concomitant administration with beta-blockers may enhance the vasoconstrictive action of certain ergot alkaloids including dihydroergotamine, ergotamine, methylergonovine, and methysergide. The risk of peripheral ischemia, resulting in cold extremities or gangrene, has been reported to be increased when ergotamine or dihydroergotamine is coadministered with selected beta-blockers, including propranolol, a beta-blocker commonly used for migraine prophylaxis. However, the precise mechanism of these interactions remains elusive. Additionally, because of the potential to cause coronary vasospasm, these ergot alkaloids could antagonize the therapeutic effects of anti-anginal agents including beta-blockers; clinicians should keep in mind that ergot alkaloids are contraindicated for use in patients with coronary heart disease or hypertension.
    Diltiazem: (Moderate) The combination of diltiazem and a beta-blocker, like bisoprolol, is usually well tolerated; the combination is often used for their combined therapeutic benefits to reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. However, because beta-blockers and diltiazem are negative inotropes and chronotropes, the combination of beta-blockers and diltiazem may cause heart failure, excessive bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac conduction abnormalities, or heart block.
    Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Diphenhydramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Diphenhydramine; Ibuprofen: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Diphenhydramine; Naproxen: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Dipyridamole: (Major) Beta-blockers should generally be withheld before dipyridamole-stress testing. Monitor the heart rate carefully following the dipyridamole injection.
    Disopyramide: (Major) Disopyramide and beta-blockers, like bisoprolol, have been used together for the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias; however, this combination should be used with caution due to the potential for additive AV blocking effects. In general, patients receiving combined therapy with disopyramide and beta-blockers should be monitored for potential bradycardia, AV block, and/or hypotension.
    Dobutamine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives such as metolazone when administered concomitantly.
    Dofetilide: (Severe) Hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia may occur with administration of potassium-depleting drugs such as loop diuretics and thiazide diuretics, increasing the potential for dofetilide-induced torsade de pointes. Additionally, in patients treated with either hydrochlorothiazide 50 mg or hydrochlorothiazide/triamterene 50 mg/100 mg daily in combination with dofetilide 500 mcg twice daily for 5 days, dofetilide AUC and Cmax concentrations increased by 27% and 21%, respectively, for the hydrochlorothiazide alone group and by 30% and 16%, respectively, for the hydrochlorothiazide/triamterene group. Furthermore, a 197% and 190% QTc increase over time was seen in the hydrochlorothiazide and hydrochlorothiazide/triamterene groups, respectively. Based on these findings, the manufacturer of dofetilide contraindicates the concomitant use of hydrochlorothiazide (alone or in combination with other drugs such as triamterene); these findings can be explained both by an increase in the plasma concentration of dofetilide and a reduction in the serum potassium concentration. In a population pharmacokinetic analysis of plasma dofetilide concentrations, the mean dofetilide clearance of dofetilide was 16% lower in patients on thiazide diuretics. It is prudent to avoid the use of any thiazide diuretic in combination with dofetilide.
    Dolasetron: (Major) The manufacturer warns that the coadministration of dolasetron with diuretics associated with hypokalemia could increase the risk of QT prolongation. Patients taking certain diuretics may develop an electrolyte abnormality that may lead to cardiac dysrhythmias and/or QT prolongation. Hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia may occur with administration of potassium-depleting drugs such as thiazide diuretics, increasing the potential for cardiac arrhythmias. Potassium levels should be within the normal range prior to and during therapy with dolasetron.
    Donepezil: (Moderate) The increase in vagal tone induced by some cholinesterase inhibitors may produce bradycardia, hypotension, or syncope. The vagotonic effect of these drugs may be increased when given with other medications known to cause bradycardia such as beta-blockers. These interactions are pharmacodynamic in nature rather than pharmacokinetic.
    Donepezil; Memantine: (Moderate) The increase in vagal tone induced by some cholinesterase inhibitors may produce bradycardia, hypotension, or syncope. The vagotonic effect of these drugs may be increased when given with other medications known to cause bradycardia such as beta-blockers. These interactions are pharmacodynamic in nature rather than pharmacokinetic. (Minor) Memantine reduced the bioavailability of hydrochlorothiazide by roughly 20% in a drug interaction study. The clinical significance of this pharmacokinetic interaction, if any, is unknown.
    Dopamine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives such as metolazone when administered concomitantly.
    Doxacurium: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of hydrochlorothiazide to patients receiving nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers (e.g., tubocurarine) can cause prolonged neuromuscular blockade due to hydrochlorothiazide-induced hypokalemia. Serum potassium concentrations should be determined and corrected (if necessary) prior to initiation of neuromuscular blockade therapy.
    Doxazosin: (Moderate) Orthostatic hypotension may be more likely if beta-blockers are coadministered with alpha-blockers.
    Dronedarone: (Major) In dronedarone clinical trials, bradycardia was seen more frequently in patients also receiving beta blockers. If coadministration of dronedarone and a beta blocker is unavoidable, administer a low dose of the beta blocker initially and increase the dosage only after ECG verification of tolerability. Concomitant administration may decreased AV and sinus node conduction. Furthermore, dronedarone is an inhibitor of CYP2D6, and some beta blockers are substrates for CYP2D6 (e.g., metoprolol, propranolol, nebivolol, carvedilol). Coadministration of dronedarone with a single dose of propranolol and multiple doses of metoprolol increased propranolol and metoprolol exposure by 1.3- and 1.6-fold, respectively.
    Droperidol: (Moderate) Caution is advised when using droperidol in combination with thiazide diuretics which may lead to electrolyte abnormalities, especially hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia, as such abnormalities may increase the risk for QT prolongation or cardiac arrhythmias.
    Dulaglutide: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Duloxetine: (Moderate) Orthostatic hypotension and syncope have been reported during duloxetine administration. The concurrent administration of bisoprolol and duloxetine may increase the risk of hypotension. It is advisable to monitor blood pressure if the combination is necessary. (Moderate) Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with venlafaxine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Hyponatremia due to SIADH may occur during therapy with SNRIs, including venlafaxine. Cases involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/l have been reported. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of the SNRI should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Dutasteride; Tamsulosin: (Minor) Tamsulosin did not potentiate the hypotensive effects of atenolol. However, since the symptoms of orthostasis are reported more frequently in tamsulosin-treated vs. placebo patients, there is a potential risk of enhanced hypotensive effects when co-administered with antihypertensive agents
    Empagliflozin: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Empagliflozin; Linagliptin: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Empagliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Enalapril, Enalaprilat: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Enalapril; Felodipine: (Moderate) Coadministration of felodipine and bisoprolol can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis. (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Enalapril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Encainide: (Major) Pharmacologically, beta-blockers, like bisoprolol, cause AV nodal conduction depression and additive effects are possible when used in combination with encainide. When used together, AV block can occur. Patients should be monitored closely and the dose should be adjusted according to clinical response.
    Enflurane: (Major) General anesthetics can potentiate the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers and can produce prolonged hypotension. Beta-blockers may be continued during general anesthesia as long as the patient is monitored for cardiac depressant and hypotensive effects. (Moderate) General anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents.
    Ephedrine: (Major) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics, such as ephedrine, may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by thiazide diuretics. Blood pressure and heart rates should be monitored closely to confirm that the desired antihypertensive effect is achieved.
    Epinephrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives such as metolazone when administered concomitantly.
    Epoprostenol: (Moderate) Epoprostenol can have additive effects when administered with other antihypertensive agents, including beta-blockers. These effects can be used to therapeutic advantage, but dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Ergocalciferol, Vitamin D2: (Major) Dose adjustment of vitamin D or vitamin D analogs may be necessary during coadministration with thiazide diuretics. Additionally, serum calcium concentrations should be monitored frequently. Monitor more frequently in patients with a history of hypercalcemia. Hypercalcemia may be exacerbated by coadministration of vitamin D or vitamin D analogs and thiazide diuretics. Thiazide diuretics are known to induce hypercalcemia by reducing the excretion of calcium in the urine.
    Ergonovine: (Major) Whenever possible, concomitant use of beta-blockers and ergot alkaloids should be avoided, since propranolol has been reported to potentiate the vasoconstrictive action of ergotamine. The risk of peripheral ischemia, resulting in cold extremities or gangrene, has been reported to be increased when ergot alkaloids are coadministered with selected beta-blockers, including propranolol, a beta-blocker commonly used for migraine prophylaxis. However, the precise mechanism of these interactions remains elusive. Additionally, because of the potential to cause coronary vasospasm, ergot alkaloids could antagonize the therapeutic effects of anti-anginal agents including beta-blockers; clinicians should keep in mind that ergot alkaloids are contraindicated for use in patients with coronary heart disease or hypertension.
    Ergotamine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers and ergot alkaloids should be approached with caution. Concomitant administration with beta-blockers may enhance the vasoconstrictive action of certain ergot alkaloids including dihydroergotamine, ergotamine, methylergonovine, and methysergide. The risk of peripheral ischemia, resulting in cold extremities or gangrene, has been reported to be increased when ergotamine or dihydroergotamine is coadministered with selected beta-blockers, including propranolol, a beta-blocker commonly used for migraine prophylaxis. However, the precise mechanism of these interactions remains elusive. Additionally, because of the potential to cause coronary vasospasm, these ergot alkaloids could antagonize the therapeutic effects of anti-anginal agents including beta-blockers; clinicians should keep in mind that ergot alkaloids are contraindicated for use in patients with coronary heart disease or hypertension.
    Ertugliflozin; Metformin: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Ertugliflozin; Sitagliptin: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Escitalopram: (Moderate) Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with escitalopram may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Hyponatremia due to SIADH has been reported during therapy with SSRIs. Cases involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/l have occurred. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of escitalopram should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Esomeprazole: (Moderate) Proton pump inhibitors, such as esomeprazole, have been associated with hypomagnesemia. Hypomagnesemia occurs with thiazide diuretics (chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone). Low serum magnesium may lead to serious adverse events such as muscle spasm, seizures, and arrhythmias. Therefore, clinicians should monitor serum magnesium concentrations periodically in patients taking a PPI and diuretics concomitantly. Patients who develop hypomagnesemia may require PPI discontinuation in addition to magnesium replacement.
    Esomeprazole; Naproxen: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy. (Moderate) Proton pump inhibitors, such as esomeprazole, have been associated with hypomagnesemia. Hypomagnesemia occurs with thiazide diuretics (chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone). Low serum magnesium may lead to serious adverse events such as muscle spasm, seizures, and arrhythmias. Therefore, clinicians should monitor serum magnesium concentrations periodically in patients taking a PPI and diuretics concomitantly. Patients who develop hypomagnesemia may require PPI discontinuation in addition to magnesium replacement.
    Estradiol Cypionate; Medroxyprogesterone: (Minor) Estrogens can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients; patients who are receiving antihypertensive agents concurrently with hormonal contraceptives should be monitored for antihypertensive effectiveness. (Minor) Estrogens can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients; patients who are receiving antihypertensive agents concurrently with hormone therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive effectiveness.
    Estradiol: (Minor) Estrogens can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients; patients who are receiving antihypertensive agents concurrently with hormonal contraceptives should be monitored for antihypertensive effectiveness. (Minor) Estrogens can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients; patients who are receiving antihypertensive agents concurrently with hormone therapy should be monitored for antihypertensive effectiveness.
    Ethanol: (Moderate) Patients should be cautioned that ingesting alcohol can increase the chance of low blood pressure and dizziness when taking a thiazide diuretic or the related drug, metolazone. Patients may wish to limit alcohol ingestion while taking one of these diuretics and should be monitored for signs or symptoms of hypotension, including postural hypotension and dizziness.
    Etodolac: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Etomidate: (Major) General anesthetics can potentiate the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers and can produce prolonged hypotension. Beta-blockers may be continued during general anesthesia as long as the patient is monitored for cardiac depressant and hypotensive effects. (Moderate) General anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents.
    Exenatide: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Famotidine; Ibuprofen: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Felodipine: (Moderate) Coadministration of felodipine and bisoprolol can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis.
    Fenoprofen: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Fentanyl: (Moderate) Fentanyl may reduce the efficacy of diuretics due to induction of the release of antidiuretic hormone. Adjustments to diuretic therapy may be needed in some patients. In addition, opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with diuretics.
    Fexofenadine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Fingolimod: (Major) If possible, do not start fingolimod in a patient who is taking a drug that slows the heart rate or atrioventricular conduction such as beta-blockers. Use of these drugs during fingolimod initiation may be associated with severe bradycardia or heart block. Seek advice from the prescribing physician regarding the possibility to switch to drugs that do not slow the heart rate or atrioventricular conduction before initiating fingolimod. After the first fingolimod dose, overnight monitoring with continuous ECG in a medical facility is advised for patients who cannot stop taking drugs that slow the heart rate or atrioventricular conduction. Experience with fingolimod in patients receiving concurrent therapy with drugs that slow the heart rate or atrioventricular conduction is limited.
    Fish Oil, Omega-3 Fatty Acids (Dietary Supplements): (Major) Dose adjustment of vitamin D or vitamin D analogs may be necessary during coadministration with thiazide diuretics. Additionally, serum calcium concentrations should be monitored frequently. Monitor more frequently in patients with a history of hypercalcemia. Hypercalcemia may be exacerbated by coadministration of vitamin D or vitamin D analogs and thiazide diuretics. Thiazide diuretics are known to induce hypercalcemia by reducing the excretion of calcium in the urine. (Moderate) Co-enzyme Q10, ubiquinone (CoQ10) may lower blood pressure. CoQ10 use in combination with antihypertensive agents may lead to additional reductions in blood pressure in some individuals. Patients who choose to take CoQ10 concurrently with antihypertensive medications should receive periodic blood pressure monitoring. Patients should be advised to inform their prescriber of their use of CoQ10. (Moderate) High doses of fish oil supplements may produce a blood pressure lowering effect. It is possible that additive reductions in blood pressure may be seen when fish oils are used in a patient already taking antihypertensive agents. (Moderate) High doses of fish oil supplements may produce a blood pressure lowering effect. It is possible that additive reductions in blood pressure may be seen when fish oils are used in a patient already taking antihypertensive agents.
    Flavoxate: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Flecainide: (Major) Pharmacologically, beta-blockers, like bisoprolol, cause AV nodal conduction depression and additive effects are possible when used in combination with flecainide. When used together, AV block can occur. During flecainide clinical trials, increased adverse events have not been reported in patients receiving combination therapy with beta-blockers and flecainide. However, patients should be monitored closely and the dose should be adjusted according to clinical response.
    Fluconazole: (Moderate) Hydrochlorothiazide may decrease the renal clearance of fluconazole. Coadministration of fluconazole 100 mg PO and hydrochlorothiazide 50 mg PO for 10 days in normal volunteers (n=13) resulted in a significant increase in fluconazole AUC and Cmax compared to fluconazole given alone. There was a mean +/- SD increase in fluconazole AUC and Cmax of 45 +/- 31% and 43 +/- 31%, respectively. These changes are attributed to a mean +/- SD reduction in fluconazole renal clearance of 30% +/- 12%.
    Fluocinolone; Hydroquinone; Tretinoin: (Moderate) A manufacturer of topical tretinoin states that tretinoin, ATRA should be administered with caution in patients who are also taking drugs known to be photosensitizers, such as thiazide diuretics, as concomitant use may augment phototoxicity. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure of treated areas.
    Fluorescein: (Moderate) Patients on beta-blockers are at an increased risk of adverse reaction when administered fluorescein injection. It is thought that beta-blockers may worsen anaphylaxis severity by exacerbating bronchospasm or by increasing the release of anaphylaxis mediators; alternately, beta-blocker therapy may make the patient more pharmacodynamically resistance to epinephrine rescue treatment.
    Fluoxetine: (Moderate) Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with fluoxetine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Hyponatremia due to SIADH has been reported during therapy with SSRIs. Cases involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/l have occurred. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of fluoxetine should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Fluoxetine; Olanzapine: (Moderate) Olanzapine may induce orthostatic hypotension and thus enhance the effects of antihypertensive agents. (Moderate) Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with fluoxetine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Hyponatremia due to SIADH has been reported during therapy with SSRIs. Cases involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/l have occurred. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of fluoxetine should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Flurbiprofen: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Fluticasone; Salmeterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Fluticasone; Umeclidinium; Vilanterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Fluticasone; Vilanterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Fluvoxamine: (Moderate) Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with fluvoxamine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Hyponatremia due to SIADH has been reported during therapy with SSRIs. Cases involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/L have occurred. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of fluvoxamine should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Food: (Major) Avoid administering marijuana and beta-blockers together as concurrent use may result in decreased beta-blocker efficacy. Marijuana is known to produce significant increases in heart rate and cardiac output lasting for 2-3 hours. Further, rare case reports of myocardial infarction and cardiac arrhythmias have been associated with marijuana use. These marijuana-induced cardiovascular effects may be detrimental to patients requiring treatment with beta-blockers; thus, coadministration of beta-blockers and marijuana should be avoided.
    Formoterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Formoterol; Mometasone: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Fosinopril: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Fosinopril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Fospropofol: (Major) General anesthetics can potentiate the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers and can produce prolonged hypotension. Beta-blockers may be continued during general anesthesia as long as the patient is monitored for cardiac depressant and hypotensive effects. (Moderate) General anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents.
    Galantamine: (Moderate) The increase in vagal tone induced by cholinesterase inhibitors, such as galantamine, may produce bradycardia or syncope. The vagotonic effect of galantamine may theoretically be increased when given with beta-blockers.
    Gallium Ga 68 Dotatate: (Major) Avoid use of other diuretics with mannitol, if possible. Concomitant administration may potentiate the renal toxicity of mannitol.
    General anesthetics: (Major) General anesthetics can potentiate the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers and can produce prolonged hypotension. Beta-blockers may be continued during general anesthesia as long as the patient is monitored for cardiac depressant and hypotensive effects. (Moderate) General anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents.
    Ginger, Zingiber officinale: (Minor) In vitro studies have demonstrated the positive inotropic effects of certain gingerol constituents of ginger; but it is unclear if whole ginger root exhibits these effects clinically in humans. It is theoretically possible that excessive doses of ginger could affect the action of inotropes; however, no clinical data are available.
    Glimepiride: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Glimepiride; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Glimepiride; Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Glipizide: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Glipizide; Metformin: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Glucagon: (Minor) A temporary increase in both blood pressure and pulse rate may occur following the administration of glucagon. Patients taking beta-blockers might be expected to have a greater increase in both pulse and blood pressure. Glucagon exerts positive inotropic and chronotropic effects and may, therefore, cause tachycardia and hypertension in some patients. The increase in blood pressure and pulse rate may require therapy in some patients with coronary artery disease.
    Glyburide: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Glyburide; Metformin: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Glycopyrrolate: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Glycopyrrolate; Formoterol: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms. (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Granisetron: (Moderate) According to the manufacturer, caution is warranted when administering granisetron to patients with preexisting electrolyte abnormalities. Patients taking certain diuretics may develop an electrolyte abnormality that may lead to cardiac dysrhythmias and/or QT prolongation. Hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia may occur with administration of potassium-depleting drugs such as loop diuretics and thiazide diuretics, increasing the potential for cardiac arrhythmias.
    Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Guanabenz: (Moderate) Guanabenz can have additive effects when administered with other antihypertensive agents, including beta-blockers. These effects can be used to therapeutic advantage, but dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Guanfacine: (Moderate) Guanfacine can have additive effects when administered with other antihypertensive agents, including beta-blockers. These effects can be used to therapeutic advantage, but dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Halofantrine: (Major) Due to the risks of cardiac toxicity of halofantrine in patients with hypokalemia and/or hypomagnesemia, the use of halofantrine should be avoided when feasible in those patients receiving thiazide diuretics. Electrolyte imbalances may occur while on these diuretics, which may in turn predispose patients to the cardiac effects of halofantrine.
    Haloperidol: (Major) In general, antipsychotics like haloperidol should be used cautiously with antihypertensive agents due to the possibility of additive hypotension. The risk of QT prolongation may also be increased during use of haloperidol and medications known to cause electrolyte imbalance such as thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) Haloperidol should be used cautiously with bisoprolol due to the possibility of additive hypotension.
    Halothane: (Major) General anesthetics can potentiate the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers and can produce prolonged hypotension. Beta-blockers may be continued during general anesthesia as long as the patient is monitored for cardiac depressant and hypotensive effects. (Moderate) General anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents.
    Hawthorn, Crataegus laevigata: (Moderate) Hawthorn, Crataegus laevigata (also known as C. oxyacantha) may potentially interact with antihypertensive, heart failure, or arrhythmia medications such as the beta-blockers. Following hawthorn administration, the cardiac action potential duration is increased and the refractory period is prolonged. Hawthorn may also lower peripheral vascular resistance. Patients with hypertension or heart failure should be advised to only use hawthorn with their prescribed medications after discussion with their prescriber. Patients who choose to take hawthorn should receive periodic blood pressure and heart rate monitoring. (Moderate) Hawthorn, Crataegus laevigata may lower peripheral vascular resistance. Hawthorn use in combination with antihypertensive agents may lead to additional reductions in blood pressure in some individuals. Patients receiving hawthorn concurrently with antihypertensive medications should receive periodic blood pressure monitoring.
    Homatropine; Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Hydralazine; Isosorbide Dinitrate, ISDN: (Moderate) Concomitant use of nitrates with other antihypertensive agents can cause additive hypotensive effects. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. (Moderate) Nitroglycerin can cause hypotension. This action may be additive with other agents that can cause hypotension such as antihypertensive agents or other peripheral vasodilators. Patients should be monitored more closely for hypotension if nitroglycerin, including nitroglycerin rectal ointment, is used concurrently with any beta-blockers.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Lisinopril: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Moexipril: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Quinapril: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Hydrocodone; Ibuprofen: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy. (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Hydrocodone; Potassium Guaiacolsulfonate: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Hydrocodone; Potassium Guaiacolsulfonate; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Hydromorphone: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Hyoscyamine: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Hyoscyamine; Methenamine; Methylene Blue; Phenyl Salicylate; Sodium Biphosphate: (Major) Thiazide diuretics may cause the urine to become alkaline. This may reduce the effectiveness of methenamine by inhibiting its conversion to formaldehyde. (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Ibuprofen lysine: (Moderate) Ibuprofen lysine may reduce the effect of diuretics; diuretics can increase the risk of nephrotoxicity of NSAIDs in dehydrated patients. During coadministration of NSAIDs and diuretic therapy, patients should be monitored for changes in the effectiveness of their diuretic therapy and for signs and symptoms of renal impairment.
    Ibuprofen: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Ibuprofen; Oxycodone: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy. (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Ibuprofen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Icosapent ethyl: (Moderate) Beta-blockers may exacerbate hypertriglyceridemia and should be discontinued or changed to alternate therapy, if possible, prior to initiation of icosapent ethyl. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics may exacerbate hypertriglyceridemia and should be discontinued or changed to alternate therapy, if possible, prior to initiation of icosapent ethyl.
    Iloperidone: (Moderate) Secondary to alpha-blockade, iloperidone can produce vasodilation that may result in additive effects during concurrent use with antihypertensive agents. The potential reduction in blood pressure can precipitate orthostatic hypotension and associated dizziness, tachycardia, and syncope. If concurrent use of iloperidone and antihypertensive agents is necessary, patients should be counseled on measures to prevent orthostatic hypotension, such as sitting on the edge of the bed for several minutes prior to standing in the morning and rising slowly from a seated position. Close monitoring of blood pressure is recommended until the full effects of the combination therapy are known.
    Iloprost: (Moderate) Additive reductions in blood pressure may occur when inhaled iloprost is administered to patients receiving other antihypertensive agents.
    Inamrinone: (Moderate) Hypokalemia may occur due to excessive diuresis during inamrinone therapy. Fluid and electrolyte changes and renal function should be carefully monitored during inamrinone therapy.
    Incretin Mimetics: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Indacaterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Indacaterol; Glycopyrrolate: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms. (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Indomethacin: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Inotersen: (Moderate) Use caution with concomitant use of inotersen and diuretics due to the risk of glomerulonephritis and nephrotoxicity.
    Insulin Degludec; Liraglutide: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Insulin Glargine; Lixisenatide: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Insulins: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Monitor patients receiving insulin closely for changes in diabetic control when thiazide diuretics are instituted or discontinued; dosage adjustments may be required. Thiazide diuretics can decrease the hypoglycemic effects of insulin by producing an increase in blood glucose levels. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes.
    Intravenous Lipid Emulsions: (Moderate) High doses of fish oil supplements may produce a blood pressure lowering effect. It is possible that additive reductions in blood pressure may be seen when fish oils are used in a patient already taking antihypertensive agents. (Moderate) High doses of fish oil supplements may produce a blood pressure lowering effect. It is possible that additive reductions in blood pressure may be seen when fish oils are used in a patient already taking antihypertensive agents.
    Isocarboxazid: (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects may be seen when monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are combined with antihypertensives. Careful monitoring of blood pressure is suggested during concurrent therapy of MAOIs with beta-blockers. Limited data suggest that bradycardia is worsened when MAOIs are administered to patients receiving beta-blockers. Although the sinus bradycardia observed was not severe, until more data are available, clinicians should use MAOIs cautiously in patients receiving beta-blockers. Patients should be instructed to rise slowly from a sitting position, and to report syncope or changes in blood pressure or heart rate to their health care provider. (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects may be seen when monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are combined with antihypertensives. Careful monitoring of blood pressure is suggested during concurrent therapy of MAOIs with diuretics. Patients should be instructed to rise slowly from a sitting position, and to report syncope or changes in blood pressure or heart rate to their health care provider.
    Isoflurane: (Major) General anesthetics can potentiate the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers and can produce prolonged hypotension. Beta-blockers may be continued during general anesthesia as long as the patient is monitored for cardiac depressant and hypotensive effects. (Moderate) General anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents.
    Isoniazid, INH; Pyrazinamide, PZA; Rifampin: (Moderate) Rifamycins induce hepatic isoenzymes CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9. Drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9, including bisoprolol, may require dosage adjustments when administered concurrently with rifamycins.
    Isoniazid, INH; Rifampin: (Moderate) Rifamycins induce hepatic isoenzymes CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9. Drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9, including bisoprolol, may require dosage adjustments when administered concurrently with rifamycins.
    Isoproterenol: (Moderate) The pharmacologic effects of isoproterenol may cause an increase in blood pressure. If isoproterenol is used concomitantly with antihypertensives, the blood pressure should be monitored as the administration of isoproterenol can compromise the effectiveness of antihypertensive agents.
    Isosorbide Dinitrate, ISDN: (Moderate) Concomitant use of nitrates with other antihypertensive agents can cause additive hypotensive effects. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. (Moderate) Nitroglycerin can cause hypotension. This action may be additive with other agents that can cause hypotension such as antihypertensive agents or other peripheral vasodilators. Patients should be monitored more closely for hypotension if nitroglycerin, including nitroglycerin rectal ointment, is used concurrently with any beta-blockers.
    Isosorbide Mononitrate: (Moderate) Concomitant use of nitrates with other antihypertensive agents can cause additive hypotensive effects. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. (Moderate) Nitroglycerin can cause hypotension. This action may be additive with other agents that can cause hypotension such as antihypertensive agents or other peripheral vasodilators. Patients should be monitored more closely for hypotension if nitroglycerin, including nitroglycerin rectal ointment, is used concurrently with any beta-blockers.
    Isradipine: (Moderate) Although concomitant therapy with beta-blockers and isradipine is generally well tolerated and can even be beneficial in some cases, coadministration of these agents can induce excessive bradycardia or hypotension. Isradipine when used in combination with beta-blockers, especially in heart failure patients, can result in additive negative inotropic effects. Finally, angina has been reported when beta-adrenergic blocking agents are withdrawn abruptly when isradipine therapy is initiated. A gradual downward titration of the beta-adrenergic blocking agent dosage during initiation of isradipine therapy can minimize or eliminate this potential interaction. Patients should be monitored carefully, however, for excessive bradycardia, cardiac conduction abnormalities, or hypotension when these drugs are given together. In general, these reactions are more likely to occur with other non-dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers than with isradipine.
    Ivabradine: (Moderate) Monitor heart rate if ivabradine is coadministered with other negative chronotropes like beta-blockers. Most patients receiving ivabradine will receive concomitant beta-blocker therapy. Coadministration of drugs that slow heart rate increases the risk for bradycardia.
    Ketamine: (Major) General anesthetics can potentiate the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers and can produce prolonged hypotension. Beta-blockers may be continued during general anesthesia as long as the patient is monitored for cardiac depressant and hypotensive effects. (Moderate) General anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents.
    Ketoprofen: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Ketorolac: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Lacosamide: (Moderate) Use lacosamide with caution in patients taking concomitant medications that affect cardiac conduction, such as beta-blockers, because of the risk of AV block, bradycardia, or ventricular tachyarrhythmia. If use together is necessary, obtain an ECG prior to lacosamide initiation and after treatment has been titrated to steady-state. In addition, monitor patients receiving lacosamide via the intravenous route closely.
    Lanreotide: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of bradycardia-inducing drugs (e.g., beta-adrenergic blockers) may have an additive effect on the reduction of heart rate associated with lanreotide. Adjust the beta-blocker dose if necessary.
    Lansoprazole: (Moderate) Proton pump inhibitors have been associated with hypomagnesemia. Hypomagnesemia occurs with thiazide diuretics (chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone). Low serum magnesium may lead to serious adverse events such as muscle spasm, seizures, and arrhythmias. Therefore, clinicians should monitor serum magnesium concentrations periodically in patients taking a PPI and diuretics concomitantly. Patients who develop hypomagnesemia may require PPI discontinuation in addition to magnesium replacement.
    Lansoprazole; Naproxen: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy. (Moderate) Proton pump inhibitors have been associated with hypomagnesemia. Hypomagnesemia occurs with thiazide diuretics (chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone). Low serum magnesium may lead to serious adverse events such as muscle spasm, seizures, and arrhythmias. Therefore, clinicians should monitor serum magnesium concentrations periodically in patients taking a PPI and diuretics concomitantly. Patients who develop hypomagnesemia may require PPI discontinuation in addition to magnesium replacement.
    Lesinurad; Allopurinol: (Moderate) The occurrence of certain hypersensitivity reactions may be increased in patients with renal impairment who receive allopurinol and thiazide diuretics in combination. The precise mechanism for such events is unclear but likely immune-mediated and may be related to an effect of oxypurinol; elevated oxypurinol concentrations appear to be associated with hypersensitivity reactions; decreased clearance of this metabolite may occur with renal impairment and with the concurrent use of thiazide diuretics. Severe skin reactions include exfoliative dermatitis, toxic epidermal necrolysis and Steven's Johnson syndrome; some reactions have been fatal. In addition, thiazide diuretics, like hydrochlorothiazide, can cause hyperuricemia. Since thiazides reduce the clearance of uric acid, patients with gout or hyperuricemia may have exacerbations of their disease.
    Levalbuterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Levobupivacaine: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents.
    Levodopa: (Moderate) Concomitant use of antihypertensive agents with levodopa can result in additive hypotensive effects. (Moderate) Concomitant use of beta-blockers with levodopa can result in additive hypotensive effects.
    Levomethadyl: (Moderate) Caution is advised when using levomethadyl in combination with other agents that may lead to electrolyte abnormalities, especially hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia. Agents that require monitoring for potential hypokalemia include thiazide diuretics.
    Levomilnacipran: (Moderate) Levomilnacipran has been associated with an increase in blood pressure. The effectiveness of beta-blockers may be diminished during concurrent use of levomilnacipran. It is advisable to monitor blood pressure if the combination is necessary. (Moderate) Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with venlafaxine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Hyponatremia due to SIADH may occur during therapy with SNRIs, including venlafaxine. Cases involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/l have been reported. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of the SNRI should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Levothyroxine: (Minor) Because thyroid hormones cause cardiac stimulation including increased heart rate and increased contractility, the effects of beta-blockers may be reduced by thyroid hormones. The reduction of effects may be especially evident when a patient goes from a hypothyroid to a euthyroid state or when excessive amounts of thyroid hormone is given to the patient.
    Levothyroxine; Liothyronine (Porcine): (Minor) Because thyroid hormones cause cardiac stimulation including increased heart rate and increased contractility, the effects of beta-blockers may be reduced by thyroid hormones. The reduction of effects may be especially evident when a patient goes from a hypothyroid to a euthyroid state or when excessive amounts of thyroid hormone is given to the patient.
    Levothyroxine; Liothyronine (Synthetic): (Minor) Because thyroid hormones cause cardiac stimulation including increased heart rate and increased contractility, the effects of beta-blockers may be reduced by thyroid hormones. The reduction of effects may be especially evident when a patient goes from a hypothyroid to a euthyroid state or when excessive amounts of thyroid hormone is given to the patient.
    Lidocaine: (Major) Drugs such as beta-blockers that decrease cardiac output reduce hepatic blood flow and thereby decrease lidocaine hepatic clearance. Also, opposing effects on conduction exist between lidocaine and beta-blockers while their effects to decrease automaticity may be additive. Propranolol has been shown to decrease lidocaine clearance and symptoms of lidocaine toxicity have been seen as a result of this interaction. This interaction is possible with other beta-blocking agents since most decrease hepatic blood flow. Monitoring of lidocaine concentrations is recommended during concomitant therapy with beta-blockers.
    Linagliptin: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Linagliptin; Metformin: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Linezolid: (Moderate) Linezolid is an antibiotic that is also a reversible, non-selective MAO inhibitor. Bradycardia may be worsened when MAO-inhibitors are co-administered to patients receiving beta-blockers. Use linezolid cautiously in patients receiving beta-blockers.
    Liothyronine: (Minor) Because thyroid hormones cause cardiac stimulation including increased heart rate and increased contractility, the effects of beta-blockers may be reduced by thyroid hormones. The reduction of effects may be especially evident when a patient goes from a hypothyroid to a euthyroid state or when excessive amounts of thyroid hormone is given to the patient.
    Liraglutide: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Lisdexamfetamine: (Moderate) Thiazides may increase blood levels and therefore potentiate the actions of amphetamines. Thiazide diuretics may increase urinary pH, acting as a urinary alkalinizer, thus reducing urinary excretion and increasing blood concentrations of the amphetamine. Co-administration of amphetamines and urinary alkalinizing agents should be avoided if possible. If needed, monitor for common amphetamine side effects, including decreased appetite, anxiety, dizziness, dry mouth, irritability, insomnia, nausea, increased blood pressure or increased heart rate. Amphetamines increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents may be needed.
    Lisinopril: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Lithium: (Major) Concurrent use of lithium and thiazide diuretics may result in lithium toxicity. Therapeutic doses of thiazide diuretics can result in an approximate 25% to 40% decrease in lithium clearance, potentially leading to significant toxicity. Lithium is primarily re-absorbed from the proximal tubules, and thiazide diuretics block sodium reabsorption at the distal tubule, which results in sodium depletion and subsequent compensatory reabsorption of sodium and lithium at the proximal tubules. If treatment with lithium and a thiazide diuretic cannot be avoided, patients should have their serum lithium concentrations closely monitored, and the lithium dosage adjusted if necessary. Monitoring for changes in lithium effectiveness as well as careful assessment of lithium concentrations is advisable, particularly during initial co-administration and after dose changes or discontinuation of the diuretic. In some cases, thiazide diuretics may be used to counteract lithium-induced polyuria, although close monitoring is necessary if such treatment is initiated. There is a lack of evidence to evaluate the safety of lithium and metolazone, a thiazide-like diuretic. The manufacturer of metolazone recommends general avoidance of diuretics and lithium due to the potential for lithium toxicity. (Moderate) Beta-blockers have been used to treat lithium-induced tremor. Because tremor may be a sign of lithium toxicity and may be masked by the coadministration of beta-blockers, patients should be monitored for other clinical signs of lithium toxicity if these medications are taken concurrently. Other clinical signs of toxicity include: anorexia; visual impairment; drowsiness; muscular weakness; fasciculations or myoclonia; ataxia; dysarthria or slurred speech; stupor or coma; confusion or impaired cognition; seizures; and arrhythmias. Limited data suggest that using propranolol, even in low doses, with lithium can lead to bradycardia and syncope. In addition, lithium renal clearance has been shown to be lower when propranolol was coadministered. It is not clear if these effects are unique for propranolol or hold true for all beta-blockers. Until more data are known, clinicians should use beta-blockers with caution in patients receiving lithium.
    Lixisenatide: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Lofexidine: (Major) Because both lofexidine and bisoprolol can cause hypotension and bradycardia, concurrent use should be avoided if possible. Patients being given lofexidine in an outpatient setting should be capable of and instructed on self-monitoring for hypotension, orthostasis, bradycardia, and associated symptoms. If clinically significant or symptomatic hypotension and/or bradycardia occur, the next dose of lofexidine should be reduced in amount, delayed, or skipped.
    Loop diuretics: (Moderate) Concomitant use of a thiazide diuretiic, or the related drug metolazone, with a loop diuretic can cause additive electrolyte and fluid loss. In patients with creatinine clearances > 30 ml/min, the combinations may also lead to profound fluid and electrolyte loss in some patients. Thus, use cautiously and with monitoring of renal function, blood pressure, cardiac status, electrolytes (especially potassium), and monitor the clinical response for the condition treated.
    Lopinavir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) Cardiac and neurologic events have been reported when ritonavir was concurrently administered with beta-blockers.
    Loratadine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Lovastatin; Niacin: (Moderate) Cutaneous vasodilation induced by niacin may become problematic if high-dose niacin is used concomitantly with other antihypertensive agents. This effect is of particular concern in the setting of acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or other acute hemodynamic compromise.
    Lurasidone: (Moderate) Due to the antagonism of lurasidone at alpha-1 adrenergic receptors, the drug may enhance the hypotensive effects of alpha-blockers and other antihypertensive agents. If concurrent use of lurasidone and antihypertensive agents is necessary, patients should be counseled on measures to prevent orthostatic hypotension, such as sitting on the edge of the bed for several minutes prior to standing in the morning and rising slowly from a seated position. Close monitoring of blood pressure is recommended until the full effects of the combination therapy are known.
    Magnesium Salicylate: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with aspirin and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Magnesium Salts: (Moderate) Diuretics may interfere with the kidneys ability to regulate magnesium concentrations. Long-term use of thiazide diuretics may impair the magnesium-conserving ability of the kidneys and lead to hypomagnesemia. In addition, use caution when prescribing sulfate salt bowel preps in patients taking medications that may affect renal function such as diuretics.
    Magnesium Sulfate; Potassium Sulfate; Sodium Sulfate: (Moderate) Use caution when prescribing sulfate salt bowel preparation in patients taking concomitant medications that may affect renal function such as diuretics.
    Mannitol: (Major) Avoid use of other diuretics with mannitol, if possible. Concomitant administration may potentiate the renal toxicity of mannitol.
    Meclofenamate Sodium: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Mefenamic Acid: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Mefloquine: (Major) Concurrent use of mefloquine and beta blockers can result in ECG abnormalities or cardiac arrest.
    Meglitinides: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Meloxicam: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Memantine: (Minor) Memantine reduced the bioavailability of hydrochlorothiazide by roughly 20% in a drug interaction study. The clinical significance of this pharmacokinetic interaction, if any, is unknown.
    Mepenzolate: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Meperidine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Meperidine; Promethazine: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Mepivacaine: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents. Peripheral vasodilation may occur after use of mepivacaine. Thus, patients receiving antihypertensive agents may experience additive hypotensive effects. Blood concentrations of local anesthetics achieved after therapeutic doses are associated with minimal change in peripheral vascular resistance. Higher blood concentrations of local anesthetics may occur due to inadvertent intravascular administration or repeated doses.
    Mepivacaine; Levonordefrin: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents. Peripheral vasodilation may occur after use of mepivacaine. Thus, patients receiving antihypertensive agents may experience additive hypotensive effects. Blood concentrations of local anesthetics achieved after therapeutic doses are associated with minimal change in peripheral vascular resistance. Higher blood concentrations of local anesthetics may occur due to inadvertent intravascular administration or repeated doses.
    Mequinol; Tretinoin: (Moderate) A manufacturer of topical tretinoin states that tretinoin, ATRA should be administered with caution in patients who are also taking drugs known to be photosensitizers, such as thiazide diuretics, as concomitant use may augment phototoxicity. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure of treated areas.
    Mestranol; Norethindrone: (Minor) Estrogen containing oral contraceptives can induce fluid retention and may increase blood pressure in some patients; monitor patients receiving concurrent therapy to confirm that the desired antihypertensive effect is being obtained.
    Metaproterenol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Metformin: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Metformin; Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Metformin; Repaglinide: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Metformin; Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Metformin; Saxagliptin: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Metformin; Sitagliptin: (Moderate) Certain drugs, such as thiazide diuretics, tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. The effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control appear to be dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, thiazide diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Patients receiving metformin should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if any of these diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in some patients. (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Methadone: (Moderate) Diuretics can cause electrolyte disturbances such as hypomagnesemia and hypokalemia, which may prolong the QT interval. As methadone may also prolong the QT interval, cautious coadministration with diuretics is needed. In addition, opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with diuretics.
    Methamphetamine: (Moderate) Thiazides may increase blood levels and therefore potentiate the actions of amphetamines. Thiazide diuretics may increase urinary pH, acting as a urinary alkalinizer, thus reducing urinary excretion and increasing blood concentrations of the amphetamine. Co-administration of amphetamines and urinary alkalinizing agents should be avoided if possible. If needed, monitor for common amphetamine side effects, including decreased appetite, anxiety, dizziness, dry mouth, irritability, insomnia, nausea, increased blood pressure or increased heart rate. Amphetamines increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents may be needed.
    Methazolamide: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics may increase the risk of hypokalemia if used concurrently with methazolamide. Monitor serum potassium levels to determine the need for potassium supplementation and/or alteration in drug therapy. There may also be an additive diuretic or hyperuricemic effect.
    Methenamine: (Major) Thiazide diuretics may cause the urine to become alkaline. This may reduce the effectiveness of methenamine by inhibiting its conversion to formaldehyde.
    Methenamine; Sodium Acid Phosphate: (Major) Thiazide diuretics may cause the urine to become alkaline. This may reduce the effectiveness of methenamine by inhibiting its conversion to formaldehyde.
    Methenamine; Sodium Acid Phosphate; Methylene Blue; Hyoscyamine: (Major) Thiazide diuretics may cause the urine to become alkaline. This may reduce the effectiveness of methenamine by inhibiting its conversion to formaldehyde. (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Methohexital: (Major) General anesthetics can potentiate the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers and can produce prolonged hypotension.
    Methotrexate: (Moderate) Coadministration of thiazide diuretics and antineoplastic agents such as methotrexate may result in reduced renal excretion of the antineoplastic agent and therefore increased myelosuppressive effects.
    Methoxsalen: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of methoxsalen and other photosensitizing agents, such as thiazide diuretics, can increase the incidence or severity of photsensitization from either compound.
    Methscopolamine: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Methylergonovine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers and ergot alkaloids should be approached with caution. Concomitant administration with beta-blockers may enhance the vasoconstrictive action of certain ergot alkaloids including dihydroergotamine, ergotamine, methylergonovine, and methysergide. The risk of peripheral ischemia, resulting in cold extremities or gangrene, has been reported to be increased when ergotamine or dihydroergotamine is coadministered with selected beta-blockers, including propranolol, a beta-blocker commonly used for migraine prophylaxis. However, the precise mechanism of these interactions remains elusive. Additionally, because of the potential to cause coronary vasospasm, these ergot alkaloids could antagonize the therapeutic effects of anti-anginal agents including beta-blockers; clinicians should keep in mind that ergot alkaloids are contraindicated for use in patients with coronary heart disease or hypertension.
    Methylphenidate: (Moderate) Methylphenidate can reduce the hypotensive effect of antihypertensive agents such as thiazide diuretics. Periodic evaluation of blood pressure is advisable during concurrent use of methylphenidate and antihypertensive agents, particularly during initial coadministration and after dosage increases of methylphenidate.
    Methysergide: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers and ergot alkaloids should be approached with caution. Concomitant administration with beta-blockers may enhance the vasoconstrictive action of certain ergot alkaloids including dihydroergotamine, ergotamine, methylergonovine, and methysergide. The risk of peripheral ischemia, resulting in cold extremities or gangrene, has been reported to be increased when ergotamine or dihydroergotamine is coadministered with selected beta-blockers, including propranolol, a beta-blocker commonly used for migraine prophylaxis. However, the precise mechanism of these interactions remains elusive. Additionally, because of the potential to cause coronary vasospasm, these ergot alkaloids could antagonize the therapeutic effects of anti-anginal agents including beta-blockers; clinicians should keep in mind that ergot alkaloids are contraindicated for use in patients with coronary heart disease or hypertension.
    Metoclopramide: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and prokinetic agents may result in decreased bioavailability of the thiazide diuretic.
    Midodrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Miglitol: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Milnacipran: (Moderate) Milnacipran has been associated with an increase in blood pressure. The effectiveness of antihypertensive agents may be diminished during concurrent use of milnacipran. It is advisable to monitor blood pressure if the combination is necessary. (Moderate) Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with venlafaxine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Hyponatremia due to SIADH may occur during therapy with SNRIs, including venlafaxine. Cases involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/l have been reported. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of the SNRI should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Milrinone: (Moderate) Concurrent administration of antihypertensive agents could lead to additive hypotension when administered with milrinone. Titrate milrinone dosage according to hemodynamic response. (Moderate) Concurrent administration of antihypertensive agents could lead to additive hypotension when administered with milrinone. Titrate milrinone dosage according to hemodynamic response.
    Mirtazapine: (Moderate) Hyponatremia has been reported very rarely during mirtazapine administration. Caution is advisable in patients receiving medications known to cause hyponatremia, such as diuretics. Hyponatremia may manifest as headache, difficulty concentrating, memory impairment, confusion, weakness, and unsteadiness which may result in falls. Severe manifestations include hallucinations, syncope, seizure, coma, respiratory arrest, and death. Symptomatic hyponatremia may require discontinuation of mirtazapine, as well as implementation of the appropriate medical interventions.
    Mivacurium: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of hydrochlorothiazide to patients receiving nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers (e.g., tubocurarine) can cause prolonged neuromuscular blockade due to hydrochlorothiazide-induced hypokalemia. Serum potassium concentrations should be determined and corrected (if necessary) prior to initiation of neuromuscular blockade therapy.
    Moexipril: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Morphine: (Moderate) Morphine may reduce the efficacy of diuretics due to induction of the release of antidiuretic hormone. Morphine may also cause acute urinary retention by causing a spasm of the bladder sphincter; men with enlarged prostates may have a higher risk of this reaction. In addition, opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with diuretics.
    Morphine; Naltrexone: (Moderate) Morphine may reduce the efficacy of diuretics due to induction of the release of antidiuretic hormone. Morphine may also cause acute urinary retention by causing a spasm of the bladder sphincter; men with enlarged prostates may have a higher risk of this reaction. In addition, opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with diuretics.
    Nabumetone: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Naproxen: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Naproxen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Naproxen; Sumatriptan: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Nateglinide: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Nefazodone: (Minor) Although relatively infrequent, nefazodone may cause orthostatic hypotension in some patients; this effect may be additive with antihypertensive agents. Blood pressure monitoring and dosage adjustments of either drug may be necessary.
    Nesiritide, BNP: (Major) The potential for hypotension may be increased when coadministering nesiritide with antihypertensive agents. (Moderate) The potential for hypotension may be increased when coadministering nesiritide with antihypertensive agents.
    Neuromuscular blockers: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of hydrochlorothiazide to patients receiving nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers (e.g., tubocurarine) can cause prolonged neuromuscular blockade due to hydrochlorothiazide-induced hypokalemia. Serum potassium concentrations should be determined and corrected (if necessary) prior to initiation of neuromuscular blockade therapy.
    Niacin, Niacinamide: (Moderate) Cutaneous vasodilation induced by niacin may become problematic if high-dose niacin is used concomitantly with other antihypertensive agents. This effect is of particular concern in the setting of acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or other acute hemodynamic compromise.
    Niacin; Simvastatin: (Moderate) Cutaneous vasodilation induced by niacin may become problematic if high-dose niacin is used concomitantly with other antihypertensive agents. This effect is of particular concern in the setting of acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or other acute hemodynamic compromise.
    Nicardipine: (Moderate) Although concomitant therapy with nicardipine and bisoprolol generally is well tolerated and can even be beneficial in some cases (by inhibiting reflex tachycardia induced by nicardipine), bisoprolol can induce excessive bradycardia or hypotension. This combination also can cause additive negative inotropic effects. Finally, angina has been reported when beta-adrenergic blocking agents are withdrawn abruptly and nicardipine therapy is initiated. A gradual downward titration of the beta-adrenergic blocking agent dosage during initiation of nicardipine therapy can minimize or eliminate this potential interaction. Patients should be monitored carefully, however, for excessive bradycardia, cardiac conduction abnormalities, or hypotension when these drugs are given together. In general, these reactions are more likely to occur with verapamil or diltiazem than with nicardipine.
    Nifedipine: (Moderate) In general, concomitant therapy of nifedipine with beta-blockers is well tolerated and can even be beneficial in some cases (i.e., inhibition of nifedipine-induced reflex tachycardia by beta-blockade). Negative inotropic and/or chronotropic effects can be additive when these drugs are used in combination. Finally, angina has been reported when beta-adrenergic blocking agents are withdrawn abruptly and nifedipine therapy is initiated. A gradual downward titration of the beta-adrenergic blocking agent dosage during initiation of nifedipine therapy may minimize or eliminate this potential interaction. Hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur during coadministration of nifedipine with beta-blockers, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis. Monitor clinical response during coadministration; adjustment of nifedipine dosage may be needed during concurrent beta-blocker therapy.
    Nimodipine: (Moderate) Nimodipine, a selective calcium-channel blocker, can enhance the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers. Although often used together, concurrent use of calcium-channel blockers and beta-blockers may result in additive hypotensive, negative inotropic, and/or bradycardic effects in some patients.
    Nisoldipine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of nisoldipine with bisoprolol can be beneficial (i.e., inhibition of vasodilation-induced reflex tachycardia by beta-blockade); however, the additive negative inotropic and/or chronotropic effects can cause adverse effects, especially in patients with compromised ventricular function or conduction defects (e.g., sinus bradycardia or AV block).
    Nitrates: (Moderate) Concomitant use of nitrates with other antihypertensive agents can cause additive hypotensive effects. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. (Moderate) Nitroglycerin can cause hypotension. This action may be additive with other agents that can cause hypotension such as antihypertensive agents or other peripheral vasodilators. Patients should be monitored more closely for hypotension if nitroglycerin, including nitroglycerin rectal ointment, is used concurrently with any beta-blockers.
    Nitroglycerin: (Moderate) Concomitant use of nitrates with other antihypertensive agents can cause additive hypotensive effects. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. (Moderate) Nitroglycerin can cause hypotension. This action may be additive with other agents that can cause hypotension such as antihypertensive agents or other peripheral vasodilators. Patients should be monitored more closely for hypotension if nitroglycerin, including nitroglycerin rectal ointment, is used concurrently with any beta-blockers.
    Nitroprusside: (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects may occur when nitroprusside is used concomitantly with other antihypertensive agents. Dosages should be adjusted carefully, according to blood pressure.
    Non-Ionic Contrast Media: (Moderate) Some clinicians consider patients taking beta-blockers to be at increased risk for anaphylactoid reactions and administer prophylactic corticosteroids/antihistamines prior to the administration of radiopaque contrast agents.
    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs: (Moderate) If nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an antihypertensive drug are concurrently used, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency and blood pressure control. Doses of antihypertensive medications may require adjustment in patients receiving concurrent NSAIDs. NSAIDs, to varying degrees, have been associated with an elevation in blood pressure. This effect is most significant in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive agents and long-term NSAID therapy. NSAIDs cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation, which may result in a reduction in renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and an increase in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients who rely upon renal prostaglandins to maintain renal perfusion may have acute renal blood flow reduction with NSAID usage. Elderly patients may be at increased risk of adverse effects from combined long-term NSAID therapy and antihypertensive agents, especially diuretics, due to age-related decreases in renal function and an increased risk of stroke and coronary artery disease. (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Norepinephrine: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can cause decreased arterial responsiveness to norepinephrine, but the effect is not sufficient to preclude their coadministration.
    Octreotide: (Moderate) Dose adjustments in drugs such as beta-blockers and calcium-channel blockers which cause bradycardia and/or affect cardiac conduction may be necessary during octreotide therapy due to additive effects. (Moderate) Patients receiving diuretics or other agents to control fluid and electrolyte balance may require dosage adjustments while receiving octreotide due to additive effects.
    Olanzapine: (Moderate) Olanzapine may induce orthostatic hypotension and thus enhance the effects of antihypertensive agents.
    Olodaterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Ombitasvir; Paritaprevir; Ritonavir: (Moderate) Cardiac and neurologic events have been reported when ritonavir was concurrently administered with beta-blockers.
    Omeprazole: (Moderate) Proton pump inhibitors have been associated with hypomagnesemia. Hypomagnesemia occurs with thiazide diuretics (chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone). Low serum magnesium may lead to serious adverse events such as muscle spasm, seizures, and arrhythmias. Therefore, clinicians should monitor serum magnesium concentrations periodically in patients taking a PPI and diuretics concomitantly. Patients who develop hypomagnesemia may require PPI discontinuation in addition to magnesium replacement.
    Omeprazole; Sodium Bicarbonate: (Moderate) Proton pump inhibitors have been associated with hypomagnesemia. Hypomagnesemia occurs with thiazide diuretics (chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone). Low serum magnesium may lead to serious adverse events such as muscle spasm, seizures, and arrhythmias. Therefore, clinicians should monitor serum magnesium concentrations periodically in patients taking a PPI and diuretics concomitantly. Patients who develop hypomagnesemia may require PPI discontinuation in addition to magnesium replacement.
    Ondansetron: (Moderate) The coadministration of ondansetron with diuretics associated with hypokalemia could increase the risk of QT prolongation. Potassium levels should be within the normal range prior to and during therapy with ondansetron.
    Oprelvekin, rh-IL-11: (Major) Patients receiving thiazide diuretics during oprelvekin, rh-IL-11 therapy are at increased risk for developing severe hypokalemia; close monitoring of fluid and electrolyte status is warranted during concurrent diuretic and oprelvekin therapy.
    Oxaprozin: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Oxybutynin: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Oxycodone: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Oxymetazoline: (Major) The vasoconstricting actions of oxymetazoline, an alpha adrenergic agonist, may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by beta-blockers. If these drugs are used together, closely monitor for changes in blood pressure. (Major) The vasoconstricting actions of oxymetazoline, an alpha adrenergic agonist, may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. If these drugs are used together, closely monitor for changes in blood pressure.
    Oxymorphone: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics.
    Paliperidone: (Moderate) Paliperidone may cause orthostatic hypotension, thereby enhancing the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents. Orthostatic vital signs should be monitored in patients receiving paliperidone and beta-adrenergic blockers who are susceptible to hypotension. (Moderate) Paliperidone may cause orthostatic hypotension, thereby enhancing the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents. Orthostatic vital signs should be monitored in patients receiving paliperidone and thiazide diuretics who are susceptible to hypotension.
    Pancuronium: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of hydrochlorothiazide to patients receiving nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers (e.g., tubocurarine) can cause prolonged neuromuscular blockade due to hydrochlorothiazide-induced hypokalemia. Serum potassium concentrations should be determined and corrected (if necessary) prior to initiation of neuromuscular blockade therapy.
    Pantoprazole: (Moderate) Proton pump inhibitors have been associated with hypomagnesemia. Hypomagnesemia occurs with thiazide diuretics (chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone). Low serum magnesium may lead to serious adverse events such as muscle spasm, seizures, and arrhythmias. Therefore, clinicians should monitor serum magnesium concentrations periodically in patients taking a PPI and diuretics concomitantly. Patients who develop hypomagnesemia may require PPI discontinuation in addition to magnesium replacement.
    Paroxetine: (Moderate) Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with paroxetine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Hyponatremia due to SIADH has been reported during therapy with SSRIs. Cases involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/l have occurred. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of paroxetine should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Pasireotide: (Major) Cautious use of pasireotide and medicines that can affect potassium or magnesium concentrations such as diuretics is advised. Pasireotide may prolong the QT interval, and hypokalemia and/or hypomagnesemia are risk factors for QT prolongation. Assess the patient's potassium and magnesium concentration before and periodically during pasireotide receipt. Correct hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia before pasireotide receipt. (Major) Pasireotide may cause a decrease in heart rate. Closely monitor patients who are also taking drugs associated with bradycardia such as beta-blockers. Dose adjustments of beta-blockers may be necessary.
    Pentamidine: (Moderate) Drugs that are associated with hypokalemia and/or hypomagnesemia such as thiazide diuretics should be used with caution in patients also receiving pentamidine. Since pentamidine may cause QT prolongation independently of electrolyte imbalances, the risk for cardiac arrhythmias is potentiated by the concomitant use of agents associated with electrolyte loss. Closely monitor serum electrolytes during pentamidine therapy.
    Pentoxifylline: (Moderate) Pentoxifylline has been used concurrently with antihypertensive drugs (beta blockers, diuretics) without observed problems. Small decreases in blood pressure have been observed in some patients treated with pentoxifylline; periodic systemic blood pressure monitoring is recommended for patients receiving concomitant antihypertensives. If indicated, dosage of the antihypertensive agents should be reduced.
    Perindopril: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Perindopril; Amlodipine: (Moderate) Coadministration of amlodipine and beta-blockers can reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. When these drugs are given together, however, hypotension and impaired cardiac performance can occur, especially in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, or aortic stenosis. (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Phendimetrazine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Phenelzine: (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects may be seen when monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are combined with antihypertensives. Careful monitoring of blood pressure is suggested during concurrent therapy of MAOIs with beta-blockers. Limited data suggest that bradycardia is worsened when MAOIs are administered to patients receiving beta-blockers. Although the sinus bradycardia observed was not severe, until more data are available, clinicians should use MAOIs cautiously in patients receiving beta-blockers. Patients should be instructed to rise slowly from a sitting position, and to report syncope or changes in blood pressure or heart rate to their health care provider. (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects may be seen when monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are combined with antihypertensives. Careful monitoring of blood pressure is suggested during concurrent therapy of MAOIs with diuretics. Patients should be instructed to rise slowly from a sitting position, and to report syncope or changes in blood pressure or heart rate to their health care provider.
    Phenothiazines: (Moderate) Electrolyte disturbances (e.g., hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, hypercalcemia) may occur with administration of thiazide diuretics, and electrolyte disturbances may increase the potential for proarrhythmic effects (e.g., QT prolongation, torsade de pointes), particularly with mesoridazine, thioridazine, or chlorpromazine. In the absence of electrolyte imbalances, these agents can be used together safely with appropriate monitoring; clinicians should monitor for evidence of electrolyte disturbances or cardiac-related patient complaints. Thiazide diuretics may potentiate the orthostatic hypotension that can be seen with the use of the phenothiazine antipsychotics.
    Phenoxybenzamine: (Moderate) Orthostatic hypotension may be more likely if beta-blockers are coadministered with alpha-blockers.
    Phentermine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Phentermine; Topiramate: (Major) Concurrent use or topiramate, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, with non-potassium sparing diuretics (e.g., thiazide diuretics) may potentiate the potassium-wasting action of these diuretics. Additionally, the addition of HCTZ to topiramate therapy may require a reduction in the topiramate dose. Alternatively, the discontinuation of HCTZ therapy may require a dose increase in topiramate. In a pharmacokinetic drug interaction study, the topiramate Cmax and AUC increased by 27% and 29% when HCTZ was added to topiramate. The clinical significance of this change is unknown. The steady-state pharmacokinetics of HCTZ were not altered to any significant degree. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Phentolamine: (Moderate) Orthostatic hypotension may be more likely if beta-blockers are coadministered with alpha-blockers.
    Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Moderate) The cardiovascular effects of sympathomimetics may reduce the antihypertensive effects produced by diuretics. Well-controlled hypertensive patients receiving decongestant sympathomimetics at recommended doses do not appear at high risk for significant elevations in blood pressure, however, increased blood pressure has been reported in some patients.
    Photosensitizing agents: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics may cause photosensitivity and may increase the photosensitization effects of photosensitizing agents used in photodynamic therapy. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin.
    Pilocarpine: (Moderate) Systemically administered pilocarpine (e.g., when used for the treatment of xerostomia or xerophthalmia) should be administered with caution in patients taking beta-blockers because of the possibility of cardiac conduction disturbances. The risk of conduction disturbances with beta-blockers and ophthalmically administered pilocarpine is low.
    Pimozide: (Major) Pimozide is associated with a well-established risk of QT prolongation and torsade de pointes (TdP). Use of pimozide and medications known to cause electrolyte imbalance may increase the risk of QT prolongation. Therefore, caution is advisable during concurrent use of pimozide and thiazide diuretics. According to the manufacturer, potassium deficiencies should be correctly prior to treatment with pimozide and normalized potassium levels should be maintained during treatment.
    Pioglitazone: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Pirbuterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Piroxicam: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Polycarbophil: (Moderate) Coadministration may lead to hypercalcemia because thiazides cause a decrease in renal tubular excretion of calcium as well as increase in distal tubular reabsorption. Each 625 mg of calcium polycarbophil contains a substantial amount of calcium (approximately 125 mg). Moderate increases in serum calcium have been seen during the treatment with thiazides; if calcium polycarbophil is used concomitantly, monitoring of serum calcium may be prudent.
    Polyethylene Glycol; Electrolytes: (Moderate) Use caution when prescribing sulfate salt bowel preparation in patients taking concomitant medications that may affect renal function such as diuretics.
    Polyethylene Glycol; Electrolytes; Ascorbic Acid: (Moderate) Use caution when prescribing sulfate salt bowel preparation in patients taking concomitant medications that may affect renal function such as diuretics.
    Porfimer: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics may cause photosensitivity and may increase the photosensitization effects of photosensitizing agents used in photodynamic therapy. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin.
    Pramlintide: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Prazosin: (Moderate) Orthostatic hypotension may be more likely if beta-blockers are coadministered with alpha-blockers. (Moderate) Prazosin is well-known to produce a 'first-dose' phenomenon. Some patients develop significant hypotension shortly after administration of the first dose. The first dose response (acute postural hypotension) of prazosin may be exaggerated in patients who are receiving beta-adrenergic blockers, diuretics, or other antihypertensive agents. Concomitant administration of prazosin with other antihypertensive agents is not prohibited, however. This can be therapeutically advantageous, but lower dosages of each agent should be used.
    Prilocaine: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents.
    Prilocaine; Epinephrine: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents. (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives such as metolazone when administered concomitantly.
    Probenecid: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can cause hyperuricemia. Although this effect represents a pharmacodynamic interaction and not a pharmacokinetic one, dosage adjustments of probenecid may be necessary if these agents are administered concurrently to patients being treated with probenecid.
    Procainamide: (Major) High or toxic concentrations of procainamide may prolong AV nodal conduction time or induce AV block; these effects could be additive with the pharmacologic actions of beta-blockers, like bisoprolol. In general, patients receiving combined therapy with procainamide and beta-blockers should be monitored for potential bradycardia, AV block, and/or hypotension. (Moderate) Procainamide can decrease blood pressure and should be used cautiously in patients receiving antihypertensive agents. Intravenous administration of procainamide is more likely to cause hypotensive effects.
    Procaine: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents. (Minor) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents.
    Propafenone: (Major) Pharmacologically, beta-blockers, like bisoprolol, cause AV nodal conduction depression and additive effects are possible when used in combination with propafenone. When used together, AV block can occur. Patients should be monitored closely and the dose should be adjusted according to clinical response.
    Propantheline: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Propofol: (Major) General anesthetics can potentiate the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers and can produce prolonged hypotension. Beta-blockers may be continued during general anesthesia as long as the patient is monitored for cardiac depressant and hypotensive effects. (Moderate) General anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents.
    Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Sympathomimetics can antagonize the effects of antihypertensives when administered concomitantly.
    Quinapril: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Quinidine: (Major) Quinidine may have additive effects (e.g., reduced heart rate, hypotension) on cardiovascular parameters when used together with beta-blockers, like pindolol. In general, patients receiving combined therapy should be monitored for potential hypotension, orthostasis, bradycardia and/or AV block and heart failure, Reduce the beta-blocker dosage if necessary. (Moderate) Quinidine can decrease blood pressure and should be used cautiously in patients receiving antihypertensive agents due to the potential for additive hypotension.
    Rabeprazole: (Moderate) Proton pump inhibitors have been associated with hypomagnesemia. Hypomagnesemia occurs with thiazide diuretics (chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, and metolazone). Low serum magnesium may lead to serious adverse events such as muscle spasm, seizures, and arrhythmias. Therefore, clinicians should monitor serum magnesium concentrations periodically in patients taking a PPI and diuretics concomitantly. Patients who develop hypomagnesemia may require PPI discontinuation in addition to magnesium replacement.
    Ramipril: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Rapacuronium: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of hydrochlorothiazide to patients receiving nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers (e.g., tubocurarine) can cause prolonged neuromuscular blockade due to hydrochlorothiazide-induced hypokalemia. Serum potassium concentrations should be determined and corrected (if necessary) prior to initiation of neuromuscular blockade therapy.
    Rasagiline: (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects may be seen when monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are combined with antihypertensives. Careful monitoring of blood pressure is suggested during concurrent therapy of MAOIs with beta-blockers. Limited data suggest that bradycardia is worsened when MAOIs are administered to patients receiving beta-blockers. Although the sinus bradycardia observed was not severe, until more data are available, clinicians should use MAOIs cautiously in patients receiving beta-blockers. Patients should be instructed to rise slowly from a sitting position, and to report syncope or changes in blood pressure or heart rate to their health care provider. (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects may be seen when monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are combined with antihypertensives. Careful monitoring of blood pressure is suggested during concurrent therapy of MAOIs with diuretics. Patients should be instructed to rise slowly from a sitting position, and to report syncope or changes in blood pressure or heart rate to their health care provider.
    Remifentanil: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) The risk of significant hypotension and/or bradycardia during therapy with remifentanil may be increased in patients receiving beta-blockers or calcium-channel blockers due to additive hypotensive effects.
    Repaglinide: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Reserpine: (Moderate) Reserpine may have additive orthostatic hypotensive effects when used with beta-blockers due to catecholamine depletion. Beta-blockers may also interfere with reflex tachycardia, worsening the orthostasis. Patients treated concurrently with a beta-blocker and reserpine should be monitored closely for evidence of hypotension or marked bradycardia and associated symptoms (e.g., vertigo, syncope, postural hypotension).
    Rifabutin: (Moderate) Rifamycins induce hepatic isoenzymes CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9. Drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9, including bisoprolol, may require dosage adjustments when administered concurrently with rifamycins.
    Rifampin: (Moderate) Rifamycins induce hepatic isoenzymes CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9. Drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9, including bisoprolol, may require dosage adjustments when administered concurrently with rifamycins.
    Rifamycins: (Moderate) Rifamycins induce hepatic isoenzymes CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9. Drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9, including bisoprolol, may require dosage adjustments when administered concurrently with rifamycins.
    Rifapentine: (Moderate) Rifamycins induce hepatic isoenzymes CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9. Drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 and CYP2C8/9, including bisoprolol, may require dosage adjustments when administered concurrently with rifamycins.
    Risperidone: (Moderate) Risperidone may induce orthostatic hypotension and thus enhance the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents. Lower initial doses or slower dose titration of risperidone may be necessary in patients receiving antihypertensive agents concomitantly. (Moderate) Risperidone may induce orthostatic hypotension and thus enhance the hypotensive effects of bisoprolol. Lower initial doses or slower dose titration of risperidone may be necessary in patients receiving bisoprolol concomitantly.
    Ritonavir: (Moderate) Cardiac and neurologic events have been reported when ritonavir was concurrently administered with beta-blockers.
    Rivastigmine: (Moderate) The increase in vagal tone induced by some cholinesterase inhibitors may produce bradycardia, hypotension, or syncope. The vagotonic effect of these drugs may theoretically be increased when given with other medications known to cause bradycardia such as beta-blockers.
    Rocuronium: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of hydrochlorothiazide to patients receiving nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers (e.g., tubocurarine) can cause prolonged neuromuscular blockade due to hydrochlorothiazide-induced hypokalemia. Serum potassium concentrations should be determined and corrected (if necessary) prior to initiation of neuromuscular blockade therapy.
    Rofecoxib: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Ropivacaine: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents.
    Rosiglitazone: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Salicylates: (Moderate) Salicylates can increase the risk of renal toxicity in patients receiving diuretics. Salicylates inhibit renal prostaglandin synthesis, which can lead to fluid retention and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Salicylates may decrease the hyperuricemic effect of hydrochlorothiazide.
    Salmeterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Salsalate: (Moderate) Concurrent use of beta-blockers with salsalate and other salicylates may result in loss of antihypertensive activity due to inhibition of renal prostaglandins and thus, salt and water retention and decreased renal blood flow.
    Saxagliptin: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Scopolamine: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Selegiline: (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects may be seen when monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are combined with antihypertensives. Careful monitoring of blood pressure is suggested during concurrent therapy of MAOIs with beta-blockers. Limited data suggest that bradycardia is worsened when MAOIs are administered to patients receiving beta-blockers. Although the sinus bradycardia observed was not severe, until more data are available, clinicians should use MAOIs cautiously in patients receiving beta-blockers. Patients should be instructed to rise slowly from a sitting position, and to report syncope or changes in blood pressure or heart rate to their health care provider. (Moderate) Additive hypotensive effects may be seen when monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are combined with antihypertensives. Careful monitoring of blood pressure is suggested during concurrent therapy of MAOIs with diuretics. Patients should be instructed to rise slowly from a sitting position, and to report syncope or changes in blood pressure or heart rate to their health care provider.
    Semaglutide: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors: (Moderate) Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with venlafaxine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Hyponatremia due to SIADH may occur during therapy with SNRIs, including venlafaxine. Cases involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/l have been reported. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of the SNRI should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Sertraline: (Moderate) Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with sertraline may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Hyponatremia due to SIADH has been reported during therapy with SSRIs. Cases involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/l have occurred. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of sertraline should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Sevoflurane: (Major) General anesthetics can potentiate the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers and can produce prolonged hypotension. Beta-blockers may be continued during general anesthesia as long as the patient is monitored for cardiac depressant and hypotensive effects. (Moderate) General anesthetics can potentiate the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents.
    SGLT2 Inhibitors: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present.
    Silodosin: (Moderate) During clinical trials with silodosin, the incidence of dizziness and orthostatic hypotension was higher in patients receiving concomitant antihypertensive treatment. Thus, caution is advisable when silodosin is administered with antihypertensive agents. (Moderate) During clinical trials with silodosin, the incidence of dizziness and orthostatic hypotension was higher in patients receiving concomitant antihypertensive treatment. Thus, caution is advisable when silodosin is administered with antihypertensive agents. In addition, increased concentrations of silodosin may occur if it is coadministered with carvedilol; exercise caution. Carvedilol is a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor and silodosin is a P-gp substrate.
    Simvastatin; Sitagliptin: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Sitagliptin: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary. Finally, both thiazides and sulfonylureas have been reported to cause photosensitivity reactions; concomitant use may increase the risk of photosensitivity.
    Sodium Phosphate Monobasic Monohydrate; Sodium Phosphate Dibasic Anhydrous: (Moderate) Concomitant use of medicines with potential to alter renal perfusion or function such as diuretics, may increase the risk of acute phosphate nephropathy in patients taking sodium phosphate monobasic monohydrate; sodium phosphate dibasic anhydrous.
    Sodium picosulfate; Magnesium oxide; Anhydrous citric acid: (Moderate) Use caution when prescribing sodium picosulfate; magnesium oxide; anhydrous citric acid in patients taking concomitant medications that may affect renal function such as diuretics. In addition, use caution in patients receiving drugs where hypokalemia is a particular risk.
    Solifenacin: (Minor) Diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms. Risk versus benefit should be addressed in patients receiving diuretics and solifenacin.
    Streptozocin: (Minor) Because streptozocin is nephrotoxic, concurrent or subsequent administration of other nephrotoxic agents (e.g,. aminoglycosides, amphotericin B, cisplatin, foscarnet, or diuretics) could exacerbate the renal insult.
    Succinylcholine: (Moderate) Beta-blockers can enhance the neuromuscular blocking activity of succinylcholine. (Moderate) Concomitant administration of hydrochlorothiazide to patients receiving nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers (e.g., tubocurarine) can cause prolonged neuromuscular blockade due to hydrochlorothiazide-induced hypokalemia. Serum potassium concentrations should be determined and corrected (if necessary) prior to initiation of neuromuscular blockade therapy.
    Sufentanil: (Moderate) Opiate agonists may potentiate orthostatic hypotension when used concurrently with thiazide diuretics. (Moderate) The incidence and degree of bradycardia and hypotension during induction with sufentanil may be increased in patients receiving beta-blockers.
    Sulfacetamide: (Moderate) Sulfonamides may cause photosensitization and may increase the photosensitizing effects of thiazide diuretics.
    Sulfacetamide; Sulfur: (Moderate) Sulfonamides may cause photosensitization and may increase the photosensitizing effects of thiazide diuretics.
    Sulfamethoxazole; Trimethoprim, SMX-TMP, Cotrimoxazole: (Major) Avoid the concomitant use of sulfamethoxazole; trimethoprim and thiazide diuretics. An increased incidence of thrombocytopenia with purpura has been reported in elderly patients during coadministration.
    Sulfinpyrazone: (Moderate) Sulfinpyrazone facilitates urinary excretion of uric acid and thereby decreases plasma urate concentrations. Thiazide diuretics can cause hyperuricemia. Dosage adjustments of sulfinpyrazone may be necessary if thiazides are administered concurrently.
    Sulfonylureas: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Sulindac: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Sympathomimetics: (Major) Sympathomimetics, such as amphetamines, phentermine, and decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine), and many other drugs, may increase both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may counteract the activity of the beta-blockers. Due to the risk of unopposed alpha-adrenergic activity, sympathomimetics should be used cautiously with beta-blockers. Increased blood pressure, bradycardia, or heart block may occur due to excessive alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Close monitoring of blood pressure or the selection of alternative therapeutic agents to the sympathomimetic agent may be needed.
    Tacrine: (Moderate) The increase in vagal tone induced by some cholinesterase inhibitors may produce bradycardia, hypotension, or syncope in some patients. The vagotonic effect of these drugs may be increased when given with other medications known to cause bradycardia such as beta-blockers. These interactions are pharmacodynamic in nature rather than pharmacokinetic.
    Tamsulosin: (Minor) Tamsulosin did not potentiate the hypotensive effects of atenolol. However, since the symptoms of orthostasis are reported more frequently in tamsulosin-treated vs. placebo patients, there is a potential risk of enhanced hypotensive effects when co-administered with antihypertensive agents
    Tasimelteon: (Major) The efficacy of tasimelteon in treating circadian rhythm disruptions may be reduced in patients receiving beta-blockers. Because the circadian rhythm of melatonin is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system, administration of beta-blockers may result in a clinically relevant blockade of melatonin secretion.
    Tazarotene: (Moderate) The manufacturer states that tazarotene should be administered with caution in patients who are also taking drugs known to be photosensitizers, such as thiazide diuretics, as concomitant use may augment phototoxicity. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure of treated areas.
    Tegaserod: (Minor) Coadminisitration of thiazides and prokinetic agents may result in decreased bioavailability of the thiazide diuretic.
    Terazosin: (Moderate) Orthostatic hypotension may be more likely if beta-blockers are coadministered with alpha-blockers.
    Terbutaline: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Tetrabenazine: (Moderate) Tetrabenazine may induce orthostatic hypotension and thus enhance the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents. Lower initial doses or slower dose titration of tetrabenazine may be necessary in patients receiving antihypertensive agents concomitantly.
    Tetracaine: (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents. Use caution with the concomitant use of tetracaine and antihypertensive agents. (Moderate) Local anesthetics may cause additive hypotension in combination with antihypertensive agents. Use extreme caution with the concomitant use of tetracaine and antihypertensive agents.
    Thalidomide: (Moderate) Thalidomide and other agents that slow cardiac conduction such as beta-blockers should be used cautiously due to the potential for additive bradycardia.
    Thiazolidinediones: (Moderate) Increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring may be required when a beta blocker is given with antidiabetic agents. Since beta blockers inhibit the release of catecholamines, these medications may hide symptoms of hypoglycemia such as tremor, tachycardia, and blood pressure changes. Other symptoms, like headache, dizziness, nervousness, mood changes, or hunger are not blunted. Beta-blockers also exert complex actions on the body's ability to regulate blood glucose. Some beta-blockers, particularly non-selective beta-blockers such as propranolol, have been noted to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a delay in recovery of blood glucose to normal levels. Hyperglycemia has been reported as well and is possibly due to beta-2 receptor blockade in the beta cells of the pancreas. A selective beta-blocker may be preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus, if appropriate for the patient's condition. Selective beta-blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol, do not appear to potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia. While beta-blockers may have negative effects on glycemic control, they reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in patients with diabetes and their use should not be avoided in patients with compelling indications for beta-blocker therapy when no other contraindications are present. (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Thiopental: (Moderate) General anesthetics can potentiate the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers and can produce prolonged hypotension. Patients receiving beta-blockers before or during surgery involving thiopental should be monitored closely for signs of heart failure.
    Thiothixene: (Moderate) Thiothixene should be used cautiously in patients receiving antihypertensive agents. Additive hypotensive effects are possible.
    Thyroid hormones: (Minor) Because thyroid hormones cause cardiac stimulation including increased heart rate and increased contractility, the effects of beta-blockers may be reduced by thyroid hormones. The reduction of effects may be especially evident when a patient goes from a hypothyroid to a euthyroid state or when excessive amounts of thyroid hormone is given to the patient.
    Tiotropium; Olodaterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Tizanidine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of tizanidine with antihypertensive agents can result in significant hypotension. Caution is advised when tizanidine is to be used in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive therapy. (Moderate) Concurrent use of tizanidine with antihypertensive agents can result in significant hypotension. Caution is advised when tizanidine is to be used in patients receiving concurrent antihypertensive therapy.
    Tolazamide: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Tolbutamide: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can decrease insulin sensitivity thereby leading to glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Diuretic-induced hypokalemia may also lead to hyperglycemia. Because of this, a potential pharmacodynamic interaction exists between thiazide diuretics and antidiabetic agents. It appears that the effects of thiazide diuretics on glycemic control are dose-related and low doses can be instituted without deleterious effects on glycemic control. In addition, diuretics reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. However, patients taking antidiabetic agents should be monitored for changes in blood glucose control if such diuretics are added or deleted. Dosage adjustments may be necessary.
    Tolmetin: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Tolterodine: (Minor) Diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Tolvaptan: (Moderate) Monitor serum sodium closely if tolvaptan and thiazide diuretics are used together. Coadministration increases the risk of too rapid correction of serum sodium.
    Topiramate: (Major) Concurrent use or topiramate, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, with non-potassium sparing diuretics (e.g., thiazide diuretics) may potentiate the potassium-wasting action of these diuretics. Additionally, the addition of HCTZ to topiramate therapy may require a reduction in the topiramate dose. Alternatively, the discontinuation of HCTZ therapy may require a dose increase in topiramate. In a pharmacokinetic drug interaction study, the topiramate Cmax and AUC increased by 27% and 29% when HCTZ was added to topiramate. The clinical significance of this change is unknown. The steady-state pharmacokinetics of HCTZ were not altered to any significant degree.
    Toremifene: (Moderate) Monitor serum calcium levels in patients receiving concomitant treatment with toremifene and thiazide diuretics. Thiazide diuretics decrease renal calcium excretion and may increase the risk of hypercalcemia in patients receiving toremifene.
    Trandolapril: (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Trandolapril; Verapamil: (Moderate) Oral calcium-channel blockers and beta-blockers like bisoprolol are used together for their therapeutic benefits to reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. However, concomitant administration of beta-adrenergic blocking agents and verapamil can lead to significant AV nodal blockade. This can manifest as heart block, bradycardia, cardiac conduction abnormalities and/or prolonged PR interval. Congestive heart failure or severe hypotension also can occur. The combination of beta-blockers and verapamil should be avoided in patients with poor ventricular function due to increased negative inotropic effects. (Moderate) Patients with hyponatremia or hypovolemia are more susceptible to developing reversible renal insufficiency when given angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics concomitantly.
    Tranylcypromine: (Severe) The use of hypotensive agents and tranylcypromine is contraindicated by the manufacturer of tranylcypromine because the effects of hypotensive agents may be markedly potentiated. (Severe) The use of hypotensive agents and tranylcypromine is contraindicated by the manufacturer of tranylcypromine because the effects of hypotensive agents may be markedly potentiated. In addition, limited data suggest that bradycardia is worsened when MAOIs are administered to patients receiving beta-blockers.
    Trazodone: (Minor) Due to additive hypotensive effects, patients receiving antihypertensive agents concurrently with trazodone may have excessive hypotension. Decreased dosage of the antihypertensive agent may be required when given with trazodone.
    Treprostinil: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics can enhance the hypotensive effects of antihypertensive agents or diuretics if given concomitantly. This additive effect may be desirable, but dosages must be adjusted accordingly.
    Tretinoin, ATRA: (Moderate) A manufacturer of topical tretinoin states that tretinoin, ATRA should be administered with caution in patients who are also taking drugs known to be photosensitizers, such as thiazide diuretics, as concomitant use may augment phototoxicity. Patients should take care and use proper techniques to limit sunlight and UV exposure of treated areas.
    Trihexyphenidyl: (Minor) Coadministration of thiazides and antimuscarinics (e.g., atropine and biperiden) may result in increased bioavailability of the thiazide. This is apparently a result of a decrease in gastrointestinal motility and rate of stomach emptying by the antimuscarinic agent. In addition, diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Trospium: (Minor) Diuretics can increase urinary frequency, which may aggravate bladder symptoms.
    Tubocurarine: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of hydrochlorothiazide to patients receiving nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers (e.g., tubocurarine) can cause prolonged neuromuscular blockade due to hydrochlorothiazide-induced hypokalemia. Serum potassium concentrations should be determined and corrected (if necessary) prior to initiation of neuromuscular blockade therapy.
    Umeclidinium; Vilanterol: (Minor) Hypokalemia associated with thiazide diuretics can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the recommended dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, use caution when coadministering beta-agonists with thiazide diuretics and monitor serum potassium as clinically indicated.
    Valdecoxib: (Moderate) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the natriuretic effect of diuretics in some patients. NSAIDS have been associated with an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which may result in reduced renal blood flow leading to renal insufficiency and increases in blood pressure that are often accompanied by peripheral edema and weight gain. Patients taking diuretics and NSAIDS concurrently are at higher risk of developing renal insufficiency. If an NSAID and a diuretic are used concurrently, carefully monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of decreased renal function and diuretic efficacy.
    Vecuronium: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of hydrochlorothiazide to patients receiving nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers (e.g., tubocurarine) can cause prolonged neuromuscular blockade due to hydrochlorothiazide-induced hypokalemia. Serum potassium concentrations should be determined and corrected (if necessary) prior to initiation of neuromuscular blockade therapy.
    Venlafaxine: (Moderate) Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with venlafaxine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Hyponatremia due to SIADH may occur during therapy with SNRIs, including venlafaxine. Cases involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/l have been reported. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of the SNRI should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Verapamil: (Moderate) Oral calcium-channel blockers and beta-blockers like bisoprolol are used together for their therapeutic benefits to reduce angina and improve exercise tolerance. However, concomitant administration of beta-adrenergic blocking agents and verapamil can lead to significant AV nodal blockade. This can manifest as heart block, bradycardia, cardiac conduction abnormalities and/or prolonged PR interval. Congestive heart failure or severe hypotension also can occur. The combination of beta-blockers and verapamil should be avoided in patients with poor ventricular function due to increased negative inotropic effects.
    Verteporfin: (Moderate) Thiazide diuretics may cause photosensitivity and may increase the photosensitization effects of photosensitizing agents used in photodynamic therapy. Prevention of photosensitivity includes adequate protection from sources of UV radiation (e.g., avoiding sun exposure and tanning booths) and the use of protective clothing and sunscreens on exposed skin.
    Vilazodone: (Moderate) Patients receiving vilazodone with medications known to cause hyponatremia, such as diuretics, may be at increased risk of developing hyponatremia. Hyponatremia has occurred in association with the use of antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and mirtazapine. Hyponatremia may manifest as headache, difficulty concentrating, memory impairment, confusion, weakness, and unsteadiness which may result in falls. Severe manifestations include hallucinations, syncope, seizure, coma, respiratory arrest, and death. Symptomatic hyponatremia may require discontinuation of vilazodone, as well as implementation of the appropriate medical interventions.
    Vitamin D analogs: (Major) Dose adjustment of vitamin D analogs may be necessary during coadministration with thiazide diuretics. Additionally, serum calcium concentrations should be monitored frequently. Monitor more frequently in patients with a history of hypercalcemia. Hypercalcemia may be exacerbated by coadministration of vitamin D analogs and thiazide diuretics. Thiazide diuretics are known to induce hypercalcemia by reducing the excretion of calcium in the urine.
    Vitamin D: (Major) Dose adjustment of vitamin D or vitamin D analogs may be necessary during coadministration with thiazide diuretics. Additionally, serum calcium concentrations should be monitored frequently. Monitor more frequently in patients with a history of hypercalcemia. Hypercalcemia may be exacerbated by coadministration of vitamin D or vitamin D analogs and thiazide diuretics. Thiazide diuretics are known to induce hypercalcemia by reducing the excretion of calcium in the urine.
    Vorinostat: (Moderate) Use vorinostat and thiazide diuretics together with caution; the risk of QT prolongation and arrhythmias may be increased if electrolyte abnormalities occur. Thiazide diuretics may cause electrolyte imbalances including low potassium; hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia, or hypocalcemia may increase the risk of QT prolongation with vorinostat. Frequently monitor serum electrolytes if concomitant use of these drugs is necessary.
    Vortioxetine: (Moderate) Patients receiving a diuretic during treatment with vortioxetine may be at greater risk of developing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Clinically significant hyponatremia has been reported during therapy with vortioxetine. One case involving serum sodium levels lower than 110 mmol/l has occurred. Hyponatremia may be potentiated by agents which can cause sodium depletion such as diuretics. Discontinuation of vortioxetine should be considered in patients who develop symptomatic hyponatremia.
    Yohimbine: (Moderate) Yohimbine can increase blood pressure and therefore can antagonize the therapeutic action of antihypertensive agents. Use with particular caution in hypertensive patients with high or uncontrolled blood pressure.
    Ziconotide: (Moderate) Patients taking diuretics with ziconotide may be at higher risk of depressed levels of consciousness. If altered consciousness occurs, consideration of diuretic cessation is warranted in addition to ziconotide discontinuation.
    Ziprasidone: (Minor) Monitor potassium and magnesium levels when thiazide diuretics are used during ziprasidone therapy. The risk of QT prolongation from ziprasidone is increased in the presence of hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia. (Minor) Ziprasidone is a moderate antagonist of alpha-1 receptors and may cause orthostatic hypotension with or without tachycardia, dizziness, or syncope. Additive hypotensive effects are possible if ziprasidone is used concurrently with antihypertensive agents.

    PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

    Pregnancy

    The combination drug, bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide, is classified by the FDA as a pregnancy category C drug. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide in pregnant women. Once pregnancy is detected, every effort should be made to discontinue bisoprolol;hydrochlorothiazide unless this combination of drugs is considered life-saving for the mother. In rat studies, bisoprolol was fetotoxic (increased late resorptions) and maternotoxic (decreased food intake and body weight gain). When given to pregnant rabbits, bisoprolol was not teratogenic but was embryolethal at dosages of 12.5 mg/kg/day. Many experts reserve diuretic use for pregnant patients with cardiac disease or essential hypertension, due to the fact that diuretic use may decrease placental perfusion and the data do not indicate a positive benefit of diuretic use on the outcome of preeclampsia during pregnancy. The pregnancy risk factor for thiazide diuretics increases to category D for those pregnant patients with reduced uteroplacental perfusion (e.g., preeclampsia or intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). In general, the bulk of the evidence does not indicate that thiazide diuretics are teratogenic in the 1st trimester, although, many experts limit their use to the 2nd and 3rd trimesters. Neonatal thrombocytopenia has been reported following maternal use of thiazide diuretics near term when thiazide diuretics have been reported to cross the placenta. Potential risks from thiazide use include electrolyte imbalances in the newborn, pancreatitis, jaundice, or neonatal complications resulting from such maternal complications such as hyperglycemia, electrolyte imbalance, or hypotension.

    MECHANISM OF ACTION

    The effects of bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide on blood pressure are additive. Thiazide diuretics lower blood pressure by increasing the excretion of sodium; whereas bisoprolol lowers blood pressure by blocking catecholamine stimulation of beta1-adrenergic receptors in the heart and blood vessels.
     
    •Hydrochlorothiazide: Thiazide diuretics increase the excretion of water by inhibiting the reabsorption of sodium and chloride ions at the distal renal tubule. The natriuretic effects are accompanied by a secondary loss of potassium and bicarbonate which can cause a mild hypokalemic, hypochloremic, metabolic alkalosis. Thiazides also decrease the elimination of calcium and uric acid. Thiazides diuretics usually do not affect normal blood pressure. When chronically administered, diuretics decrease peripheral vascular resistance. The exact mechanism responsible for the lowered peripheral resistance is not known; however, excretion of urinary sodium by the kidneys is required to achieve blood pressure reduction. Initially, diuretics lower blood pressure by decreasing cardiac output, plasma volume and extracellular fluid volume. Cardiac output eventually returns to normal, plasma and extracellular fluid values return to slightly less than normal, but peripheral vascular resistance is reduced, resulting in lower blood pressure. Thiazide diuretics also decrease the glomerular filtration rate, which contributes to the drug's lower efficacy in patients with renal impairment. The changes in plasma volume induce an elevation in plasma renin activity and aldosterone secretion which contributes to the potassium losses associated with thiazide diuretics. In general, diuretics can worsen glucose tolerance and lipid abnormalities.
     
    •Bisoprolol: Bisoprolol is a beta1-selective adrenoceptor blocking agent. Similar to metoprolol and atenolol, bisoprolol, in low doses, selectively blocks catecholamine stimulation of beta1-adrenergic receptors in the heart and vascular smooth muscle. The pharmacodynamic consequences of this activity include: reduction of resting and exercise heart rate (negative chronotropic effect) and, subsequently, cardiac output; reduction of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure at rest and with exercise; and possible reduction of reflex orthostatic hypotension. Electrophysiology studies have shown that bisoprolol increases sinus node recovery time, prolongs AV node refractory periods, and prolongs AV nodal conduction. With oral doses of >= 20 mg/day, bisoprolol also can competitively block beta2-adrenergic responses in the bronchial and vascular smooth muscles, potentially causing bronchospasm.

    PHARMACOKINETICS

    Bisoprolol; hydrochlorothiazide is administered orally. No change in the bioavailability of either agent is observed when administered concurrently and absorption is not affected by food.
    Bisoprolol: About 30% of bisoprolol is bound to serum proteins. Bisoprolol is equally eliminated by renal and non-renal pathways with about 50% of the dose appearing as unchanged drug in the urine and the remainder appearing as inactive metabolites. Less than 2% of a dose is excreted in the feces. Bisoprolol is not metabolized by cytochrome P450 2D6. The elimination half-life of bisoprolol is 9—12 hours.
    Hydrochlorothiazide: Hydrochlorothiazide crosses the placenta, but not the blood-brain barrier, and is distributed into breast milk. Hydrochlorothiazide is not significantly metabolized and is excreted unchanged in the urine. At least 61% of the oral dose is eliminated unchanged within 24 hours. The elimination half-life ranges from 5.6—14.8 hours.

    Oral Route

    Bisoprolol: The absolute bioavailability of bisoprolol after an oral dose is about 80%. Food does not affect absorption. Peak plasma concentrations occur within 2—4 hours of dosing. Plasma concentrations are proportional to the administered dose in the range of 5—20 mg. Once daily dosing of bisoprolol results in less than two-fold intersubject variation in peak plasma concentrations. 
    Hydrochlorothiazide: Hydrochlorothiazide absorption from the GI tract varies depending on the formulation, dose, and presence of concomitant disease states. Absorption is reduced in patients with hepatic, cardiac, and/or renal disease. The bioavailability is approximately 60—70%. The onset of action is 2 hours following oral administration, with peak effects occurring at 4 hours. The duration of action ranges from 6—12 hours.